„Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,“

—  John Donne, buch Holy Sonnets

No. 10, line 1
Holy Sonnets (1633)
Kontext: Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,
For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow,
Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

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John Donne Foto
John Donne4
englischer Schriftsteller 1572 - 1631

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Letitia Elizabeth Landon Foto
Ernest Hemingway Foto
Frederick William Faber Foto

„O majesty unspeakable and dread!
Wert thou less mighty than Thou art,
Thou wert, O Lord, too great for our belief,
Too little for our heart.“

—  Frederick William Faber British hymn writer and theologian 1814 - 1863

The Greatness of God.
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

Angelus Silesius Foto
Reginald Heber Foto

„Thou art gone to the grave; but we will not deplore thee,
Though sorrows and darkness encompass the tomb.“

—  Reginald Heber English clergyman 1783 - 1826

"At a Funeral", No. II.
need further publication dates

Robert Southey Foto

„Thou hast been called, O sleep! the friend of woe;
But ’tis the happy that have called thee so.“

—  Robert Southey British poet 1774 - 1843

Canto XV, st. 11.
The Curse of Kehama (1810)

Gavrila Derzhavin Foto

„Thou art! directing, guiding all, Thou art!
Direct my understanding then to Thee;
Control my spirit, guide my wandering heart:
Though but an atom midst immensity.“

—  Gavrila Derzhavin Russian poet 1743 - 1816

Poemː God
Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 283.

Alexander Pope Foto

„How loved, how honored once, avails thee not,
To whom related, or by whom begot;
A heap of dust alone remains of thee;
'Tis all thou art, and all the proud shall be!“

—  Alexander Pope eighteenth century English poet 1688 - 1744

Quelle: The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope (1717), Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady, Line 71.

„No longer would we imprison thee though thou art all gentleness and would chat and jest with us by the hour.“

—  Samuel Laman Blanchard British author and journalist 1804 - 1845

"A Quarrel with some Old Acquaintances".
Sketches from Life (1846)

George Gordon Byron Foto

„A mighty lesson we inherit:
Thou art a symbol and a sign
To Mortals of their fate and force;
Like thee, Man is in part divine,
A troubled stream from a pure source“

—  George Gordon Byron English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement 1788 - 1824

III.
Prometheus (1816)
Kontext: Thy Godlike crime was to be kind,
To render with thy precepts less
The sum of human wretchedness,
And strengthen Man with his own mind;
But baffled as thou wert from high,
Still in thy patient energy,
In the endurance, and repulse
Of thine impenetrable Spirit,
Which Earth and Heaven could not convulse,
A mighty lesson we inherit:
Thou art a symbol and a sign
To Mortals of their fate and force;
Like thee, Man is in part divine,
A troubled stream from a pure source;
And Man in portions can foresee
His own funereal destiny;
His wretchedness, and his resistance,
And his sad unallied existence:
To which his Spirit may oppose
Itself — and equal to all woes,
And a firm will, and a deep sense,
Which even in torture can decry
Its own concenter'd recompense,
Triumphant where it dares defy,
And making Death a Victory.

Angelus Silesius Foto
Romain Rolland Foto

„I fight with other voices, other arms than thine. Though thou art conquered, yet art thou of the army which is never vanquished. Remember that and thou wilt fight even unto death.“

—  Romain Rolland French author 1866 - 1944

Jean-Christophe (1904 - 1912), Journey's End: The Burning Bush (1911)
Kontext: "Thou art not alone, and thou dost not belong to thyself. Thou art one of My voices, thou art one of My arms. Speak and strike for Me. But if the arm be broken, or the voice be weary, then still I hold My ground: I fight with other voices, other arms than thine. Though thou art conquered, yet art thou of the army which is never vanquished. Remember that and thou wilt fight even unto death."
"Lord, I have suffered much!"
"Thinkest thou that I do not suffer also? For ages death has hunted Me and nothingness has lain in wait for Me. It is only by victory in the fight that I can make My way. The river of life is red with My blood."
"Fighting, always fighting?"
"We must always fight. God is a fighter, even He Himself. God is a conqueror. He is a devouring lion. Nothingness hems Him in and He hurls it down. And the rhythm of the fight is the supreme harmony. Such harmony is not for thy mortal ears. It is enough for thee to know that it exists. Do thy duty in peace and leave the rest to the Gods."

Robert-François Damiens Foto

„O death, why art thou so long in coming?“

—  Robert-François Damiens French domestic servant and attempted assassin 1715 - 1757

Attributed last words
Quelle: Frederic Rowland (1900). The Last Words (Real and Traditional) of Distinguished Men and Women. Troy, New York: C. A. Brewster & Co.

Angelus Silesius Foto
Marcus Aurelius Foto

„Death hangs over thee: whilst yet thou livest, whilst thou mayest, be good.“

—  Marcus Aurelius, buch Selbstbetrachtungen

IV, 14 (trans. Meric Casaubon)
τὸ χρεὼν ἐπήρτηται· ἕως ζῇς, ἕως ἔξεστιν, ἀγαθὸς γενοῦ.
IV, 17 (trans.George Long)
Meditations (c. 121–180 AD), Book IV
Variante: Death hangs over thee. While thou livest, while it is in thy power, be good.

Percy Bysshe Shelley Foto
Marcus Aurelius Foto
Ernest Hemingway Foto

„I am thee and thou art me and all of one is the other.“

—  Ernest Hemingway, buch Wem die Stunde schlägt

Quelle: For Whom the Bell Tolls

Baldur von Schirach Foto

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