„I have drowned
in the big sea
now I find I'm still alive“

—  Mike Scott

"The Big Music"
This Is the Sea (1985)
Kontext: I have drowned
in the big sea
now I find I'm still alive
And I'm coming up forever
shadows all behind me
ecstacy to come

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Mike Scott Foto
Mike Scott40
songwriter, musician 1958

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„I'm still alive, which is pretty cool.“

—  Charlie Sheen American film and television actor 1965

Quote summary in The Los Angeles Times (2011)

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„When I was older
I was a sailor
On an open sea
But now I'm underwater
And my skin is paler
Than it should ever be“

—  Billie Eilish American singer-songwriter 2001

When I Was Older, Music Inspired by the Film Roma (9 January 2019)
Singles (2017 - )

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„I'm still trying to perform those tricks. Now I do it with writing.“

—  Ray Bradbury American writer 1920 - 2012

Playboy interview (1996)
Kontext: I had decided to be a magician well before I decided to be a writer. I was the little boy who would get up on-stage and do magic wearing a fake mustache, which would fall off during the performance. I'm still trying to perform those tricks. Now I do it with writing.

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„But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime…
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.“

—  Wilfred Owen English poet and soldier (1893-1918) 1893 - 1918

Dulce et Decorum Est (1917)
Kontext: Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! — An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime...
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

Lewis Carroll Foto
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„I no longer feel I'll be dead by thirty; now it's sixty. I suppose these deadlines we set for ourselves are really a way of saying we appreciate time, and want to use all of it. I'm still writing, I'm still writing poetry, I still can't explain why, and I'm still running out of time.“

—  Margaret Atwood Canadian writer 1939

On Writing Poetry (1995)
Kontext: I no longer feel I'll be dead by thirty; now it's sixty. I suppose these deadlines we set for ourselves are really a way of saying we appreciate time, and want to use all of it. I'm still writing, I'm still writing poetry, I still can't explain why, and I'm still running out of time. Wordsworth was sort of right when he said, "Poets in their youth begin in gladness/ But thereof comes in the end despondency and madness." Except that sometimes poets skip the gladness and go straight to the despondency. Why is that? Part of it is the conditions under which poets work — giving all, receiving little in return from an age that by and large ignores them — and part of it is cultural expectation — "The lunatic, the lover and the poet," says Shakespeare, and notice which comes first. My own theory is that poetry is composed with the melancholy side of the brain, and that if you do nothing but, you may find yourself going slowly down a long dark tunnel with no exit. I have avoided this by being ambidextrous: I write novels too. But when I find myself writing poetry again, it always has the surprise of that first unexpected and anonymous gift.

Herman Melville Foto
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„It is just as much a matter of chance that I am still alive as that I might have been hit.“

—  Erich Maria Remarque, buch Im Westen nichts Neues

Quelle: All Quiet on the Western Front (1929), Ch. 6
Kontext: It is just as much a matter of chance that I am still alive as that I might have been hit. In a bomb-proof dugout I might have been smashed to atoms, and in the open survive ten hours' bombardment unscathed. No soldier survives a thousand chances. But every soldier believes in Chance and trusts his luck.

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„The subject matter is unimportant, provided what I have done is interesting as a painting. I chose the modern era because it is the one I understand best; I find it more alive for people who are alive.“

—  Frédéric Bazille French painter 1841 - 1870

as quoted in: 'Frédéric Bazille and the Birth of Impressionism', Corrinne Chong, PhD -independent scholar http://www.19thc-artworldwide.org/autumn17/chong-reviews-frederic-bazille-and-the-birth-of-impressionism
Quotes, undated

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