„I venture to say that every man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale of the Constitution.“

Speech https://api.parliament.uk/historic-hansard/commons/1864/may/11/second-reading in the House of Commons (11 May 1864)
1860s
Kontext: I venture to say that every man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale of the Constitution.... fitness for the franchise, when it is shown to exist—as I say it is shown to exist in the case of a select portion of the working class—is not repelled on sufficient grounds from the portals of the Constitution by the allegation that things are well as they are. I contend, moreover, that persons who have prompted the expression of such sentiments as those to which I have referred, and whom I know to have been Members of the working class, are to be presumed worthy and fit to discharge the duties of citizenship, and that to admission to the discharge of those duties they are well and justly entitled.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
William Ewart Gladstone Foto
William Ewart Gladstone
britischer Politiker 1809 - 1898

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John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton Foto

„The danger is not that a particular class is unfit to govern. Every class is unfit to govern.“

—  John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton British politician and historian 1834 - 1902

Letter to Mary Gladstone (1881)
Kontext: The danger is not that a particular class is unfit to govern. Every class is unfit to govern. The law of liberty tends to abolish the reign of race over race, of faith over faith, of class over class.

Ernst Hanfstaengl Foto

„The Jews who already have been ousted were put out because they were morally and politically unfit to safeguard German interests.“

—  Ernst Hanfstaengl German businessman 1887 - 1975

Quoted in "The Riot at Christie Pits" - Page 61 - by Cyril Levitt, William Shaffir - 1987

Barry Goldwater Foto

„I'm frankly sick and tired of the political preachers across this country telling me as a citizen that if I want to be a moral person, I must believe in "A," "B," "C" and "D." Just who do they think they are? And from where do they presume to claim the right to dictate their moral beliefs to me?“

—  Barry Goldwater American politician 1909 - 1998

Address on religious factions (1981)
Kontext: I must make it clear that I don't condemn these groups for what they believe. I happen to share many of the values emphasized by these organizations.
I'm frankly sick and tired of the political preachers across this country telling me as a citizen that if I want to be a moral person, I must believe in "A," "B," "C" and "D." Just who do they think they are? And from where do they presume to claim the right to dictate their moral beliefs to me?
And I am even more angry as a legislator who must endure the threats of every religious group who thinks it has some God-granted right to control my vote on every roll call in the Senate. I am warning them today: I will fight them every step of the way if they try to dictate their moral convictions to all Americans in the name of "conservatism." … This unrelenting obsession with a particular goal destroys the perspective of many decent people. They have become easy prey to manipulation and misjudgment.

Marie de Rabutin-Chantal, marquise de Sévigné Foto

„There is no person who is not dangerous for some one.“

—  Marie de Rabutin-Chantal, marquise de Sévigné French noble 1626 - 1696

Il n'y a personne qui ne soit dangereux pour quelqu'un.
Lettres.
Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations

Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay Foto

„[I]f it is the moral right we are to look at, I say, that on every principle of moral obligation, I hold that the Jew has a right to political power.“

—  Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay British historian and Whig politician 1800 - 1859

Speech in the House of Commons (5 April 1830) https://api.parliament.uk/historic-hansard/commons/1830/apr/05/the-jews#column_1313 in favour of Robert Grant's Jewish Disabilities Bill
1830s

John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton Foto
Rick Santorum Foto
Daniel Hannan Foto

„The most dangerous diminutions of freedom come from those who are convinced of their moral rectitude.“

—  Daniel Hannan British politician 1971

Spoken by Daniel Hannan on Judge Andrew Napolitano's online streaming FOX News program, Freedom Watch (29 April 2009)
2000s

Edmund Burke Foto

„Men who undertake considerable things, even in a regular way, ought to give us ground to presume ability.“

—  Edmund Burke, buch Reflections on the Revolution in France

Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790)

John F. Kennedy Foto

„A man does what he must — in spite of personal consequences, in spite of obstacles and dangers, and pressures — and that is the basis of all human morality.“

—  John F. Kennedy, buch Profiles in Courage

1964 Memorial Edition, p. 266 http://www.jfklibrary.org/Research/Research-Aids/Ready-Reference/JFK-Quotations/Profiles-in-Courage-quotations.aspx
Variante: A man does what he must — in spite of personal consequences, in spite of obstacles and dangers and pressures — and that is the basis of all human morality.
Quelle: Pre-1960, Profiles in Courage (1956)
Kontext: The courage of life is often a less dramatic spectacle than the courage of a final moment; but it is no less a magnificent mixture of triumph and tragedy. A man does what he must — in spite of personal consequences, in spite of obstacles and dangers, and pressures — and that is the basis of all human morality. In whatever area in life one may meet the challenges of courage, whatever may be the sacrifices he faces if he follows his conscience — the loss of his friends, his fortune, his contentment, even the esteem of his fellow men — each man must decide for himself the course he will follow. The stories of past courage can define that ingredient — they can teach, they can offer hope, they can provide inspiration. But they cannot supply courage itself. For this each man must look into his own soul.
Kontext: For without belittling the courage with which men have died, we should not forget those acts of courage with which men — such as the subjects of this book — have lived. The courage of life is often a less dramatic spectacle than the courage of a final moment; but it is no less a magnificent mixture of triumph and tragedy. A man does what he must — in spite of personal consequences, in spite of obstacles and dangers, and pressures — and that is the basis of all human morality. In whatever area in life one may meet the challenges of courage, whatever may be the sacrifices he faces if he follows his conscience — the loss of his friends, his fortune, his contentment, even the esteem of his fellow men — each man must decide for himself the course he will follow. The stories of past courage can define that ingredient — they can teach, they can offer hope, they can provide inspiration. But they cannot supply courage itself. For this each man must look into his own soul.

Winston S. Churchill Foto
Ulysses S. Grant Foto
Dorothy L. Sayers Foto
Rajendra Prasad Foto
Paul Fussell Foto
Franklin Pierce Adams Foto
Bob Dylan Foto
Henry Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston Foto

„I have read your speech and I must frankly say, with much regret as there is little in it that I can agree with, and much from which I differ. You lay down broadly the Doctrine of Universal Suffrage which I can never accept. I intirely deny that every sane and not disqualified man has a moral right to a vote—I use that Expression instead of “the Pale of the Constitution”, because I hold that all who enjoy the Security and civil Rights which the Constitution provides are within its Pale—What every Man and Woman too have a Right to, is to be well governed and under just Laws, and they who propose a change ought to shew that the present organization does not accomplish those objects…[Your speech] was more like the Sort of Speech with which Bright would have introduced the Reform Bill which he would like to propose than the Sort of Speech which might have been expected from the Treasury bench in the present State of Things. Your Speech may win Lancashire for you, though that is doubtful but I fear it will tend to lose England for you. It is to be regretted that you should, as you stated, have taken the opportunity of your receiving a Deputation of working men, to exhort them to set on Foot an Agitation for Parliamentary Reform—The Function of a Government is to calm rather than to excite Agitation.“

—  Henry Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston British politician 1784 - 1865

Letter to William Ewart Gladstone (12 May 1864), quoted in Philip Guedalla (ed.), Gladstone and Palmerston, being the Correspondence of Lord Palmerston with Mr. Gladstone 1851-1865 (London: Victor Gollancz, 1928), pp. 281-282.
1860s

George Orwell Foto

„[...] antisemitism is rationalised by saying that the Jew is a person who spreads disaffection and weakens national morale.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950

Quelle: Antisemitism in Britain (1945)

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