„So it's part vanity, it's part privacy and part sensitivity.“

—  Bono, Rolling Stone interview (2005), Context: I'm the Imelda Marcos of sunglasses.... Very sensitive eyes to light. If somebody takes my photograph, I will see the flash for the rest of the day. My right eye swells up. I've a blockage there, so that my eyes go red a lot. So it's part vanity, it's part privacy and part sensitivity. On his sunglasses; Imelda Marcos famously had a huge collection of shoes.
Bono Foto
Bono
irischer Sänger und Musiker (U2) 1960
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„Every part of the system is so related to every other part that a change in a particular part causes a changes in all other parts and in the total system“

—  Arthur D. Hall American electrical engineer 1925 - 2006
A methodology for systems engineering, 1962, Cited in: Harold Chestnut (1967) Systems Engineering Methods. p. 121

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„One part of a picture ought to be like the first part of a tune, that you guess what follows, and that makes the second part of the tune, and so I'm done..“

—  Thomas Gainsborough English portrait and landscape painter 1727 - 1788
1755 - 1769, Quote from Gainsborough's letter to his friend William Jackson of Exeter, from Bath, Feb. 1768; as cited in Thomas Gainsborough, by William T, Whitley https://ia800204.us.archive.org/6/items/thomasgainsborou00whitrich/thomasgainsborou00whitrich.pdf; New York, Charles Scribner's Sons – London, Smith, Elder & Co, Sept. 1915, p. 383 (Appendix A - Letter V)

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„Without this ridiculous vanity that takes the form of self-display and is part of everything and everyone, we would see nothing, and nothing would exist.“

—  Antonio Porchia Italian Argentinian poet 1885 - 1968
Voces (1943), Sin esa tonta vanidad que es el mostrarnos y que es de todos y de todo, no veríamos nada y no existiría nada. [[]]

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„As far as I can tell, my story is part autobiography, part hero's journey, part epic fantasy, part travelogue, part faerie tale, part coming of age story, part romance, part mystery, part metafictional-nested-story-frame-tale-something-or-other.
I am, quite frankly, making this up as I go.“

—  Patrick Rothfuss American fantasy writer 1973
Official site, Context: My book is different. In case you hadn't noticed, the story I'm telling is a little different. It's a little shy on the Aristotelian unities. It doesn't follow the classic Hollywood three-act structure. It's not like a five-act Shakespearean play. It's not like a Harlequin romance. So what *is* the structure then? Fuck if I know. That's part of what's taking me so long to figure out. As far as I can tell, my story is part autobiography, part hero's journey, part epic fantasy, part travelogue, part faerie tale, part coming of age story, part romance, part mystery, part metafictional-nested-story-frame-tale-something-or-other. I am, quite frankly, making this up as I go. If I get it right, I get something like The Name of the Wind. Something that makes all of us happy. But if I fuck it up, I'll end up with a confusing tangled mess of a story. Now I'm not trying to claim that I'm unique in this. That I'm some lone pioneer mapping the uncharted storylands. Other authors do it too. My point is that doing something like this takes more time that writing another shitty, predictable Lord of the Rings knockoff. Sometimes I think it would be nice to write a that sort of book. It would be nice to be able to use those well-established structures like a sort of recipe. A map. A paint-by-numbers kit. It would be so much easier, and quicker. But it wouldn't be a better book. And it's not really the sort of book I want to write. On the progress of The Wise Man's Fear in "Concerning the Release of Book Two" (26 February 2009) http://blog.patrickrothfuss.com/2009/02/concerning-the-release-of-book-two/

George Raft Foto

„Part of the loot went for gambling, part for horses, and part for women. The rest I spent foolishly.“

—  George Raft American actor 1901 - 1980
George Raft explaining how he spent a $10 million fortune. Quoted in Mardy Grothe, Viva la repartee: clever comebacks and witty retorts from history's great wits and wordsmiths (2005), page 83 http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=aZpmpt7ksr8C&pg=PA83&dq=%22Part+of+the+loot+went+for+gambling,+part+for+horses%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=hBgsT4HyB4_Y8QPpy-HoDg&ved=0CDMQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22Part%20of%20the%20loot%20went%20for%20gambling%2C%20part%20for%20horses%22&f=false

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“