„Beyond that, it was impossible to obtain a word from the valiant chief, and this silence seemed the mark of a genius sure of himself.“

—  Anatole France, buch The Revolt of the Angels

Quelle: The Revolt of the Angels (1914), Ch. XXXV
Kontext: The archangel Michael took supreme command. He reassured their minds by his serenity. His countenance, wherein his soul was visible, expressed contempt for danger. By his orders, the chiefs of the thunderbolts, the Kerûbs, grown dull with the long interval of peace, paced with heavy steps the ramparts of the Holy Mountain, and, letting the gaze of their bovine eyes wander over the glittering clouds of their Lord, strove to place the divine batteries in position. After inspecting the defences, they swore to the Most High that all was in readiness. They took counsel together as to the plan they should follow. Michael was for the offensive. He, as a consummate soldier, said it was the supreme law. Attack, or be attacked, — there was no middle course.
"Moreover," he added, "the offensive attitude is particularly suitable to the ardour of the Thrones and Dominations."
Beyond that, it was impossible to obtain a word from the valiant chief, and this silence seemed the mark of a genius sure of himself.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Anatole France Foto
Anatole France12
französischer Schriftsteller 1844 - 1924

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Ernest Flagg Foto

„Simplicity is the mark of genius.“

—  Ernest Flagg American architect 1857 - 1947

Small Houses: Their Economic Design and Construction (1922)
Kontext: Simplicity and Dignity are so nearly related that they may be considered together.... A quiet air of reserved power is characteristic of dignity, and that is best obtained by simple means and the absence of apparent effort. Simplicity is the mark of genius. The giant in art does his work easily, without straining and without affectation; his ways are direct and to the point.

Aslan Maskhadov Foto
Julian (emperor) Foto

„To explain, however, everything relating to the nature of this deity, is beyond the power of man, even though the god himself should grant him the ability to understand it: in a case where it seems, to me at least, impossible even mentally to conceive all its extent.“

—  Julian (emperor) Roman Emperor, philosopher and writer 331 - 363

Upon the Sovereign Sun (362)
Kontext: To explain, however, everything relating to the nature of this deity, is beyond the power of man, even though the god himself should grant him the ability to understand it: in a case where it seems, to me at least, impossible even mentally to conceive all its extent. And now that we have discussed so much, we must put as it were a seal upon this subject; and to stay a while and pass on to other points no less requiring examination. What then is this seal; and what comprises everything, as it were in a summary of the conception concerning the nature of the god? May He Himself inspire our understanding when we attempt briefly to explain the source out of which he proceeded; and what he is himself; and with what effects he fills the visible world. It must therefore be laid down that the sovereign Sun proceeded from the One God, — One out of the one Intelligible world; he is stationed in the middle of the Intelligible Powers, according to the strictest sense of "middle position;" bringing the last with the first into a union both harmonious and loving, and which fastens together the things that were divided: containing within himself the means of perfecting, of cementing together, of generative life, and of the uniform existence, and to the world of Sense, the author of all kinds of good; not merely adorning and cheering it with the radiance wherewith he himself illumines the same, but also by making subordinate to himself the existence of the Solar Angels; and containing within himself the unbegotten Cause of things begotten; and moreover, prior to this, the unfading, unchanging source of things eternal.
All, therefore, that was fitting to be said touching the nature of this deity (although very much has been passed over in silence) has now been stated at some length.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge Foto

„Silence does not always mark wisdom.“

—  Samuel Taylor Coleridge English poet, literary critic and philosopher 1772 - 1834

Mario Savio Foto
Francois Mauriac Foto
Sarah Dessen Foto
Jacques Pierre Brissot Foto

„It is less difficult for a woman to obtain celebrity by her genius than to be forgiven for it.“

—  Jacques Pierre Brissot French revolutionary 1754 - 1793

Quoted in Familiar Short Sayings of Great Men https://www.bartleby.com/344/64.html by Samuel Arthur Bent. Published by Ticknor and Co. in 1887.

Nélson Rodrigues Foto

„Love is impossible without bite marks.“

—  Nélson Rodrigues Brazilian writer and playwright 1912 - 1980

Moisés Neto. Nelson Rodrigues: o nosso boca de ouro, p 3.

Wallace Stevens Foto

„She sang beyond the genius of the sea“

—  Wallace Stevens American poet 1879 - 1955

"The Idea of Order at Key West"
Ideas of Order (1936)

Jane Austen Foto

„One word from you shall silence me forever.“

—  Jane Austen, buch Stolz und Vorurteil

Quelle: Pride and Prejudice

Arthur Koestler Foto
Tobias Smollett Foto

„True courage scorns
To vent her prowess in a storm of words;
And, to the valiant, actions speak alone.“

—  Tobias Smollett 18th-century poet and author from Scotland 1721 - 1771

Act II, scene vii.
The Regicide (1749)

Novalis Foto

„No one, of a surety, wanders farther from the mark than he who fancies to himself that he already understands this marvellous Kingdom, and can, in few words, fathom its constitution, and everywhere find the right path.“

—  Novalis German poet and writer 1772 - 1801

Pupils at Sais (1799)
Kontext: No one, of a surety, wanders farther from the mark than he who fancies to himself that he already understands this marvellous Kingdom, and can, in few words, fathom its constitution, and everywhere find the right path. To no one, who has broken off, and made himself an Island, will insight rise of itself, nor even without toilsome effort. Only to children, or childlike men, who know not what they do, can this happen. Long, unwearied intercourse, free and wise Contemplation, attention to faint tokens and indications; an inward poet-life, practised senses, a simple and devout spirit: these are the essential requisites of a true Friend of Nature; without these no one can attain his wish.

Simone de Beauvoir Foto

„One is not born a genius, one becomes a genius; and the feminine situation has up to the present rendered this becoming practically impossible.“

—  Simone de Beauvoir, buch Das andere Geschlecht

Bk. I, Pt. 2, Ch. 8: Since the French Revolution: the Job and the Vote, p. 133
Quelle: The Second Sex (1949)

Robert Charles Wilson Foto
Jacques Lacan Foto

„Behind the word is silence, behind that silence is forgetfulness.“

—  Giannina Braschi Puerto Rican writer 1953

Empire of Dreams (prose poetry, 1988)

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