„To avoid any assertion about the infinitude of the straight line, Euclid says a line segment“

Quelle: Mathematical Thought from Ancient to Modern Times (1972), p. 175
Kontext: To avoid any assertion about the infinitude of the straight line, Euclid says a line segment (he uses the word "line" in this sense) can be extended as far as necessary. Unwillingness to involve the infinitely large is seen also in Euclid's statement of the parallel axiom. Instead of considering two lines that extend to infinity and giving a direct condition or assumption under which parallel lines might exist, his parallel axiom gives a condition under which two lines will meet at some finite point.

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Morris Kline Foto
Morris Kline
US-amerikanischer Mathematiker 1908 - 1992

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„The straight line belongs to Man. The curved line belongs to God.“

—  Antoni Gaudí Catalan architect 1852 - 1926

The real author seems to be Pierre Albert-Birot https://books.google.com/books?id=3Ul51CwjUOcC&pg=PA290&dq=%22the+curved+line+that+belongs+let%27s+say+to+God+and+the+straight+line+that+belongs+to+man%22&hl=de&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22the%20curved%20line%20that%20belongs%20let%27s%20say%20to%20God%20and%20the%20straight%20line%20that%20belongs%20to%20man%22&f=false.
Attributed

Friedensreich Hundertwasser Foto

„The straight line is godless and immoral.“

—  Friedensreich Hundertwasser Austrian artist 1928 - 2000

Mould Manifesto against Rationalism in Architecture (1958)

Hans Freudenthal Foto
Archimedes Foto
James Burke (science historian) Foto

„This makes you think in straight lines. And if today doesn't happen in straight lines -- think of your own experience -- why should the past have?“

—  James Burke (science historian) British broadcaster, science historian, author, and television producer 1936

Connections (1979), 10 - Yesterday, Tomorrow and You
Kontext: The question is in what way are the triggers around us likely to operate to cause things to change -- for better or worse. And, is there anything we can learn from the way that happened before, so we can teach ourselves to look for and recognize the signs of change? The trouble is, that's not easy when you have been taught as I was, for example, that things in the past happened in straight-forward lines. I mean, take one oversimple example of what I'm talking about: the idea of putting the past into packaged units -- subjects, like agriculture. The minute you look at this apparently clear-cut view of things, you see the holes. I mean, look at the tractor. Oh sure, it worked in the fields, but is it a part of the history of agriculture or a dozen other things? The steam engine, the electric spark, petroleum development, rubber technology. It's a countrified car. And, the fertilizer that follows; it doesn't follow! That came from as much as anything else from a fellow trying to make artificial diamonds. And here's another old favorite: Eureka! Great Inventors You know, the lonely genius in the garage with a lightbulb that goes ping in his head. Well, if you've seen anything of this series, you'll know what a wrong approach to things that is. None of these guys did anything by themselves; they borrowed from other people's work. And how can you say when a golden age of anything started and stopped? The age of steam certainly wasn't started by James Watt; nor did the fellow whose engine he was trying to repair -- Newcomen, nor did his predecessor Savorey, nor did his predecessor Papert. And Papert was only doing what he was doing because they had trouble draining the mines. You see what I'm trying to say? This makes you think in straight lines. And if today doesn't happen in straight lines -- think of your own experience -- why should the past have? That's part of what this series has tried to show: that the past zig-zagged along -- just like the present does -- with nobody knowing what's coming next. Only we do it more complicatedly, and it's because our lives are that much more complex than theirs were that it's worth bothering about the past. Because if you don't know how you got somewhere, you don't know where you are. And we are at the end of a journey -- the journey from the past.

„The attempt to avoid a direct affirmation about infinite parallel straight lines caused Euclid to phrase the parallel axiom in a rather complicated way. He realized that, so worded, this axiom lacked the self-sufficiency of the other nine axioms, and there is good reason to believe that he avoided using it until he had to. Many Greeks tried to find substitute axioms for the parallel axiom or to prove it on the basis of the other nine. …Simplicius“

—  Morris Kline American mathematician 1908 - 1992

Quelle: Mathematical Thought from Ancient to Modern Times (1972), p. 177
Kontext: The attempt to avoid a direct affirmation about infinite parallel straight lines caused Euclid to phrase the parallel axiom in a rather complicated way. He realized that, so worded, this axiom lacked the self-sufficiency of the other nine axioms, and there is good reason to believe that he avoided using it until he had to. Many Greeks tried to find substitute axioms for the parallel axiom or to prove it on the basis of the other nine.... Simplicius cites others who worked on the problem and says further that people "in ancient times" objected to the use of the parallel postulate.

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„My formula for happiness: a Yes, a No, a straight line, a goal.“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche German philosopher, poet, composer, cultural critic, and classical philologist 1844 - 1900

„A straight line is not the shortest distance between two points.“

—  Madeleine L'Engle American writer 1918 - 2007

Quelle: A Wrinkle in Time: With Related Readings

„The growth of love is not a straight line, but a series of hills and valleys.“

—  Madeleine L'Engle American writer 1918 - 2007

Quelle: Two-Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage

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Mark Twain Foto

„A circle is a round straight line with a hole in the middle.“

—  Mark Twain American author and humorist 1835 - 1910

Quoting a schoolchild in "English as She Is Taught"

„Following straight lines shortens distances, and also life.“

—  Antonio Porchia Italian Argentinian poet 1885 - 1968

El ir derecho acorta las distancias, y también la vida.
Voces (1943)

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