„But there is no way you can have one without the other. This demand is not in the interest of the survival of this living organism.“

—  U. G. Krishnamurti, No Way Out (2002), Context: Whether you are interested in moksha, liberation, freedom, transformation, you name it, you are interested in happiness without one moment of unhappiness, pleasure without pain, it is the same thing. Whether one is here in India or Russia or in America or anywhere, what people want is to have one without the other. But there is no way you can have one without the other. This demand is not in the interest of the survival of this living organism. Ch. 2: Nothing To Be Transformed
U. G. Krishnamurti Foto
U. G. Krishnamurti
Anti-Guru 1918 - 2007
Werbung

Ähnliche Zitate

W.C. Fields Foto
Yann Martel Foto
Werbung
Lurlene McDaniel Foto
Steven Erikson Foto
Yukio Mishima Foto
James Baldwin Foto

„There is no one best way to organize… Any way of organizing is not equally effective.“

—  Jay R. Galbraith American business theorist 1939 - 2014
Designing complex organizations, 1973, p. 2: The two underlying assumptions of contingency theory

Stanley Knowles Foto
PZ Myers Foto
George Orwell Foto

„If you live for others, you must live for others, and not as a roundabout way of getting an advantage for yourself.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950
Context: Shakespeare starts by assuming that to make yourself powerless is to invite an attack. This does not mean that everyone will turn against you (Kent and the Fool stand by Lear from first to last), but in all probability someone will. If you throw away your weapons, some less scrupulous person will pick them up. If you turn the other cheek, you will get a harder blow on it than you got on the first one. This does not always happen, but it is to be expected, and you ought not to complain if it does happen. The second blow is, so to speak, part of the act of turning the other cheek. First of all, therefore, there is the vulgar, common-sense moral drawn by the Fool: "Don't relinquish power, don't give away your lands." But there is also another moral. Shakespeare never utters it in so many words, and it does not very much matter whether he was fully aware of it. It is contained in the story, which, after all, he made up, or altered to suit his purposes. It is: "Give away your lands if you want to, but don't expect to gain happiness by doing so. Probably you won't gain happiness. If you live for others, you must live for others, and not as a roundabout way of getting an advantage for yourself." "Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool," Polemic (March 1947)

Horacio Quiroga Foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“