„We are all of us, it has been said, the children of immigrants and foreigners — even the American Indian, although he arrived here a little earlier.“

Preface
Sackett's Land (1974)
Kontext: We are all of us, it has been said, the children of immigrants and foreigners — even the American Indian, although he arrived here a little earlier. What a man is and what he becomes is in part due to his heritage, and the men and women who came west did not emerge suddenly from limbo. Behind them were ancestors, families, and former lives. Yet even as the domestic cattle of Europe evolved into the wild longhorns of Texas, so the American pioneer had the characteristics of a distinctive type.
Physically and psychologically, the pioneers' need for change had begun in the old countries with their decision to migrate. In most cases their decisions were personal, ordered by no one else. Even when migration was ordered or forced, the people who survived were characterized by physical strength, the capacity to endure, and not uncommonly, a rebellious nature.
History is not made only by kings and parliaments, presidents, wars, and generals. It is the story of people, of their love, honor, faith, hope and suffering; of birth and death, of hunger, thirst and cold, of loneliness and sorrow. In writing my stories I have found myself looking back again and again to origins, to find and clearly see the ancestors of the pioneers.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Louis L'Amour Foto
Louis L'Amour1
amerikanischer Schriftsteller 1908 - 1988

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„We are all immigrants to this land. It's just that some of us came earlier than others.“

—  Romeo LeBlanc Canadian politician 1927 - 2009

Quelle: installation speech February 8, 1995

Frances Kellor Foto
Frances Kellor Foto
Theodore Roosevelt Foto
Ward Churchill Foto
Barack Obama Foto
Ben Croshaw Foto
Frances Kellor Foto

„A second principle of Americanization is identity of economic interest. At this time, after all America has united to win the war, one hesitates to turn a page so shameful in American history. And yet, if America reverts to its former industrial brutality and indifference, Americanization will fail. Identity of economic interest, generally speaking, has meant to the American getting the immigrant to work for him at as low a wage as possible, for as long hours as possible, and scrapping him at the end of the game, with as little compunction as he did an old machine. And the immigrant's successful fellow-countryman, elevated to be a private banker, a padrone, or a notary public, has shared the practices of the native American. Always the immigrant has been in positions of the greatest danger, and with less safeguards for his care. He has been called by number and nicknamed and ridiculed. Frequently trades-unions have excluded him from their benefits, compensation laws have discriminated against him, trades have been closed to him, until he has wondered in the bitterness of his spirit what American opportunity was and how he could pursue life, liberty, and happiness at his work. Whenever he has been discontented, the popular remedy has been higher wages or shorter hours, and rarely the expansion of personal relationships. Very little self-determination has been given to him; on the contrary he has been made a cog in a highly organized industrial machine. His spirit has been imprisoned in the hum of machinery. His special gifts have been lost, even as his lack of skill in mechanical work has injured delicate processes and priceless materials. His pride has been humiliated and his initiative stifled because he has been given little of the artisan's pleasure in seeing his finished product.“

—  Frances Kellor American sociologist 1873 - 1952

What is Americanization? (1919)

Robert Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood Foto
Mahatma Gandhi Foto

„A general belief seems to prevail in the colony that the Indians are little better, if at all, than the savages or natives of Africa. Even the children are taught to believe in that manner, with the result that the Indian is being dragged down to the position of a raw Kaffir.“

—  Mahatma Gandhi pre-eminent leader of Indian nationalism during British-ruled India 1869 - 1948

During his time in South Africa from The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi, Government of India (CWMG), Vol I, p. 150
1900s

Theresa May Foto

„I have consistently said that immigration has been good for this country,“

—  Theresa May Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1956

Brexit: MPs to have vote by 12 March, says May https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-47348610 BBC News (24 February 2019)
2010s, 2019

Calvin Coolidge Foto
Calvin Coolidge Foto

„We are, in some sense, an immigrant nation, molded in the fires of a common experience. That common experience is our history. And it is that common experience we must hand down to our children, even as the fundamental principles of Americanism, based on righteousness, were handed down to us, in perpetuity, by the founders of our government.“

—  Calvin Coolidge American politician, 30th president of the United States (in office from 1923 to 1929) 1872 - 1933

1920s, Whose Country Is This? (1921)
Kontext: From its very beginning our country has been enriched by a complete blend of varied strains in the same ethnic family. We are, in some sense, an immigrant nation, molded in the fires of a common experience. That common experience is our history. And it is that common experience we must hand down to our children, even as the fundamental principles of Americanism, based on righteousness, were handed down to us, in perpetuity, by the founders of our government.

Donald J. Trump Foto
Gloria Estefan Foto
Chuck Palahniuk Foto
John Calvin Foto
Israel Zangwill Foto
Muhammad bin Tughluq Foto
Michelle Obama Foto

„He never stopped smiling and laughing — even while struggling to button his shirt, even while using two canes to get himself across the room to give my mom a kiss. He just woke up a little earlier and worked a little harder.“

—  Michelle Obama lawyer, writer, wife of Barack Obama and former First Lady of the United States 1964

2000s, Democratic National Convention speech (2008)
Kontext: My dad was our rock. Although he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in his early 30s, he was our provider, our champion, our hero. As he got sicker, it got harder for him to walk, it took him longer to get dressed in the morning. But if he was in pain, he never let on. He never stopped smiling and laughing — even while struggling to button his shirt, even while using two canes to get himself across the room to give my mom a kiss. He just woke up a little earlier and worked a little harder.

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