„At the end of the day, if there was indeed some Body or presence standing there to judge me, I hoped I would be judged on whether I had lived a true life, not on whether I believed in a certain book, or whether I'd been baptized.“

—  Lance Armstrong, buch It's Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life

Quelle: It's Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life (2000), p. 113
Kontext: I wished hard, but I didn't pray. I had developed a certain distrust of organized religion growing up, but I felt I had the capacity to be a spiritual person, and to hold some fervent beliefs. Quite simply, I believed I had a responsiblity to be a good person, and that meant fair, honest, hardworking, and honorable. If I did that, if I was good to my family, true to my friends, if I gave back to my community or to some cause, if I wasn't a liar, a cheat, or a thief, then I believed that should be enough. At the end of the day, if there was indeed some Body or presence standing there to judge me, I hoped I would be judged on whether I had lived a true life, not on whether I believed in a certain book, or whether I'd been baptized. If there was indeed a God at the end of my days, I hoped he didn't say, "But you were never a Christian, so you're going the other way from heaven." If so, I was going to reply, "You know what? You're right. Fine."

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Lance Armstrong Foto
Lance Armstrong2
ehemaliger US-amerikanischer Profi-Radrennfahrer 1971

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Layal Abboud Foto

„I compete with myself, people will judge whether I deserve to be on the scene or not.“

—  Layal Abboud Lebanese pop singer 1982

January 16, 2008; Al-Jarida http://www.aljarida.com/articles/1461245935503330200/
2008

Hope Solo Foto
Geronimo Foto
Ingmar Bergman Foto

„Regardless of whether I believe or not, whether I am a Christian or not, I would play my part in the collective building of the cathedral.“

—  Ingmar Bergman Swedish filmmaker 1918 - 2007

Four Screenplays of Ingmar Bergman (1960).
Kontext: People ask what are my intentions with my films — my aims. It is a difficult and dangerous question, and I usually give an evasive answer: I try to tell the truth about the human condition, the truth as I see it. This answer seems to satisfy everyone, but it is not quite correct. I prefer to describe what I would like my aim to be. There is an old story of how the cathedral of Chartres was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. Then thousands of people came from all points of the compass, like a giant procession of ants, and together they began to rebuild the cathedral on its old site. They worked until the building was completed — master builders, artists, labourers, clowns, noblemen, priests, burghers. But they all remained anonymous, and no one knows to this day who built the cathedral of Chartres.
Regardless of my own beliefs and my own doubts, which are unimportant in this connection, it is my opinion that art lost its basic creative drive the moment it was separated from worship. It severed an umbilical cord and now lives its own sterile life, generating and degenerating itself. In former days the artist remained unknown and his work was to the glory of God. He lived and died without being more or less important than other artisans; 'eternal values,' 'immortality' and 'masterpiece' were terms not applicable in his case. The ability to create was a gift. In such a world flourished invulnerable assurance and natural humility. Today the individual has become the highest form and the greatest bane of artistic creation.
The smallest wound or pain of the ego is examined under a microscope as if it were of eternal importance. The artist considers his isolation, his subjectivity, his individualism almost holy. Thus we finally gather in one large pen, where we stand and bleat about our loneliness without listening to each other and without realizing that we are smothering each other to death. The individualists stare into each other's eyes and yet deny the existence of each other.
We walk in circles, so limited by our own anxieties that we can no longer distinguish between true and false, between the gangster's whim and the purest ideal. Thus if I am asked what I would like the general purpose of my films to be, I would reply that I want to be one of the artists in the cathedral on the great plain. I want to make a dragon's head, an angel, a devil — or perhaps a saint — out of stone. It does not matter which; it is the sense of satisfaction that counts.
Regardless of whether I believe or not, whether I am a Christian or not, I would play my part in the collective building of the cathedral.

Hans Frank Foto

„It doesn't matter whether I'm judged criminal. I have a great feeling of guilt - I have a feeling that I ran after Hitler like a wildfire without reason. If I can sacrifice my life to make something good, I'd gladly do it.“

—  Hans Frank German war criminal 1900 - 1946

To Leon Goldensohn, March 5, 1946, from "The Nuremberg Interviews" by Leon Goldensohn, Robert Gellately - History - 2004

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. Foto

„Life is an end in itself, and the only question as to whether it is worth living is whether you have had enough of it.“

—  Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. United States Supreme Court justice 1841 - 1935

Speech to the Bar Association of Boston, in Speeches (1913), p. 86.
1910s

Emil M. Cioran Foto

„I don't know yet whether I fully believe in fate, but certain things do happen in a man's life that he cannot explain.“

—  David Gemmell, buch Legend

Quelle: Drenai series, Legend, Pt 1: Against the Horde, Ch. 23

Leonardo DiCaprio Foto
Albert Camus Foto

„There is but one truly serious philosophical problem and that is suicide. Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy.“

—  Albert Camus, buch Der Mythos des Sisyphos

The Myth of Sisyphus and other essays by Albert Camus, An Absurd Reasoning : Absurdity and Suicide p. 3 (1942, 1955)
Absurdity and Suicide
The Myth of Sisyphus (1942), An Absurd Reasoning
Kontext: There is but one truly serious philosophical problem and that is suicide. Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy. All the rest – whether or not the world has three dimensions, whether the mind has nine or twelve categories – comes afterwards. These are games; one must first answer. And if it is true, as Nietzsche claims, that a philosopher, to deserve our respect, must preach by example, you can appreciate the importance of that reply, for it will precede the definitive act. These are facts the heart can feel; yet they call for careful study before they become clear to the intellect. If I ask myself how to judge that this question is more urgent than that, I reply that one judges by the actions it entails. I have never seen anyone die for the ontological argument.

Bertrand Russell Foto

„I do not believe that I am now dreaming, but I cannot prove that I am not. I am, however, quite certain that I am having certain experiences, whether they be those of a dream or those of waking life.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits (1948), p. 172
1940s

Julie Andrews Foto
George Gordon Byron Foto
Orson Scott Card Foto

„I always tell what I believe. Whether it's true, I'm no more sure than any man.“

—  Orson Scott Card American science fiction novelist 1951

Quelle: The Tales of Alvin Maker, Seventh Son (1987), Chapter 9.

Alberto Manguel Foto
Matthew Lewis (writer) Foto
Desmond Tutu Foto

„Whether Jews like it or not, they are a peculiar people. They can't ever hope to be judged by the same standards which are used for other people.“

—  Desmond Tutu South African churchman, politician, archbishop, Nobel Prize winner 1931

As quoted in http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Op-Ed-Contributors/Nobel-winners-problem-with-a-peculiar-people-and-Israel (June 2, 2012)

Arthur Kekewich Foto
James Bolivar Manson Foto

„Tell the Trustees I think it is a very good Sickert — but the question is whether he is important enough for the Tate. I think not; but as an old friend of the artist perhaps I am a prejudiced judge.“

—  James Bolivar Manson British artist 1879 - 1945

Quoted in Frances Spalding, The Tate: A History (1998), pp. 62–70. Tate Gallery Publishing, London. ISBN 1854372319.

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