„I ask no one who may read this book to accept my views. I ask him to think for himself.“

Quelle: Social Problems (1883), Ch. 21 : Conclusion
Kontext: I ask no one who may read this book to accept my views. I ask him to think for himself.
Whoever, laying aside prejudice and self-interest, will honestly and carefully make up his own mind as to the causes and the cure of the social evils that are so apparent, does, in that, the most important thing in his power toward their removal. This primary obligation devolves upon us individually, as citizens and as men. Whatever else we may be able to do, this must come first. For "if the blind lead the blind, they both shall fall into the ditch."
Social reform is not to be secured by noise and shouting; by complaints and denunciation; by the formation of parties, or the making of revolutions; but by the awakening of thought and the progress of ideas. Until there be correct thought, there cannot be right action; and when there is correct thought, right action will follow. Power is always in the hands of the masses of men. What oppresses the masses is their own ignorance, their own short-sighted selfishness.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Henry George Foto
Henry George1
US-amerikanischer politischer Ökonom und Befürworter einer … 1839 - 1897

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Jerome David Salinger Foto

„If there is an amateur reader still left in the world — or anybody who just reads and runs — I ask him or her, with untellable affection and gratitude, to split the dedication of this book four ways with my wife and children.“

—  Jerome David Salinger, buch Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction

Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction (1963), Dedication

Derek Landy Foto
Jerome David Salinger Foto

„I asked him what, if anything, got him down about teaching. He said he didn't think that anything about it got him exactly down, but there was one thing, he thought, that frightened him: reading the pencilled notations in the margins of books in the college library.“

—  Jerome David Salinger, buch Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction

Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction (1963), Seymour: An Introduction (1959)

Norman Mailer Foto

„When I read it, I don't wince, which is all I ever ask for a book I write.“

—  Norman Mailer American novelist, journalist, essayist, playwright, film maker, actor and political candidate 1923 - 2007

On Tough Guys Don't Dance as quoted in The New York Times (8 June 1984)

Sukirti Kandpal Foto
Ralph Waldo Emerson Foto
Saki Foto
Kenzaburō Ōe Foto
Ed Miliband Foto

„I may be new to this game, but I think I ask the questions.“

—  Ed Miliband British politician 1969

At his first Prime Minister's Questions as Leader of the Opposition. http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-east-news/todays-news/2010/10/14/ed-miliband-shines-at-prime-minister-s-questions-61634-27467793/ 14 Oct 2010
2010

John Lancaster Spalding Foto

„To ask them to read books whose life-breath is pure thought and beauty is as though one asked them to read things written in a language they do not understand and have no desire to learn.“

—  John Lancaster Spalding Catholic bishop 1840 - 1916

Quelle: Aphorisms and Reflections (1901), pp. 11-12
Kontext: The multitude are matter-of-fact. They live in commonplace concerns and interests. Their problems are, how to get more plentiful and better food and drink, more comfortable and beautiful clothing, more commodious dwellings, for themselves and their children. When they seek relaxation from their labors for material things, they gossip of the daily happenings, or they play games or dance or go to the theatre or club, or they travel or they read story books, or accounts in the newspapers of elections, murders, peculations, marriages, divorces, failures and successes in business; or they simply sit in a kind of lethargy. They fall asleep and awake to tread again the beaten path. While such is their life, it is not possible that they should take interest or find pleasure in religion, poetry, philosophy, or art. To ask them to read books whose life-breath is pure thought and beauty is as though one asked them to read things written in a language they do not understand and have no desire to learn. A taste for the best books, as a taste for whatever is best, is acquired; and it can be acquired only by long study and practice. It is a result of free and disinterested self-activity, of efforts to attain what rarely brings other reward than the consciousness of having loved and striven for the best. But the many have little appreciation of what does not flatter or soothe the senses. Their world, like the world of children and animals, is good enough for them; meat and drink, dance and song, are worth more, in their eyes, than all the thoughts of all the literatures. A love tale is better than a great poem, and the story of a bandit makes Plutarch seem tiresome. This is what they think and feel, and what, so long as they remain what they are, they will continue to think and feel. We do not urge a child to read Plato—why should we find fault with the many for not loving the best books?

„I was always determined to find just the right book for that one child who maybe was a reluctant reader. I knew there was a book to turn him on to reading. I just had to find it. I do have a special place in my heart for kids who maybe have trouble reading or who just don't want to for various reasons. It's always my goal to write books that will somehow entice them to want to read.“

—  Debbie Dadey American children's writer 1959

Children's author Debbie Dadey visiting downtown library to sign books, brainstorm. https://lancasteronline.com/features/entertainment/children-s-author-debbie-dadey-visiting-downtown-library-to-sign/article_bf6e4607-f0ba-5e73-a88f-64c9cb876bb2.html (July 29, 2013)

Jesse Ventura Foto

„I asked him the most important question that I think you could ask — if he had ever seen Caddyshack.“

—  Jesse Ventura American politician and former professional wrestler 1951

On what he spoke about in his meeting with Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama (9 May 2001); a scene in that film has the character played by Bill Murray telling a story about having caddied for the Dalai Lama.

Kamal Haasan Foto
Romain Rolland Foto

„No one ever reads a book. He reads himself through books, either to discover or to control himself.“

—  Romain Rolland French author 1866 - 1944

Quelle: Journey Within (1947), Ch. 2 : The Three Revelations
Kontext: No one ever reads a book. He reads himself through books, either to discover or to control himself. And the most objective books are the most deceptive. The greatest book is not the one whose message engraves itself on the brain, as a telegraphic message engraves itself on the ticker-tape, but the one whose vital impact opens up other viewpoints, and from writer to reader spreads the fire that is fed by the various essences, until it becomes a vast conflagration leaping from forest to forest.

Clive Staples Lewis Foto

„I am not asking anyone to accept Christianity if his best reasoning tells him that the weight of the evidence is against it.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis, buch Christentum schlechthin

Book III, Chapter 11, "Faith"
Mere Christianity (1952)

John Banville Foto
Jodi Picoult Foto

„There were things to do, people to see, questions to ask. Books to read.“

—  Genevieve Cogman novelist and game designer 1972

Quelle: The Burning Page (2016), Chapter 27 (p. 354)

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