„For what imaginable purpose was man made, if not to be "happy"?“

Pt. I, Bk. II, ch. 1.
1830s, The French Revolution. A History (1837)
Kontext: For what imaginable purpose was man made, if not to be "happy"? By victorious Analysis, and Progress of the Species, happiness enough now awaits him. Kings can become philosophers; or else philosophers Kings. Let but Society be once rightly constituted,—by victorious Analysis. The stomach that is empty shall be filled; the throat that is dry shall be wetted with wine. Labour itself shall be all one as rest; not grievous, but joyous Wheat-fields, one would think, cannot come to grow untilled; no man made clayey, or made weary thereby;—unless indeed machinery will do it? Gratuitous Tailors and Restaurateurs may start up, at fit intervals, one as yet sees not how. But if each will, according to rule of Benevolence, have a care for all, then surely—no one will be uncared for. Nay, who knows but by sufficiently victorious Analysis, "human life may be indefinitely lengthened," and men get rid of Death, as they have already done of the Devil? We shall then be happy in spite of Death and the Devil.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Thomas Carlyle Foto
Thomas Carlyle6
schottischer Essayist und Historiker 1795 - 1881

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„God, when he created the human species, wished their happiness; and made for them the provision which he has made, with that view, and for that purpose.“

—  William Paley Christian apologist, natural theologian, utilitarian 1743 - 1805

Vol. I, Book II, Ch. V.
The Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy (1785)

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„You've made a happy man very old.“

—  Billy Connolly British comedian 1942

An Audience With Billy - 1985

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„Out among the stars lay a massive body of knowledge, some of it an extension of what mankind knew, some of it concerning matters which Man had not yet suspected, and used in ways and for purposes that Man had not as yet imagined. And never might imagine, if left on his own.“

—  Clifford D. Simak, buch Way Station

Quelle: Way Station (1963), Ch. 11
Kontext: There was so much knowledge in the galaxy and he knew so little of it, understood so little of the little that he knew.
There were men on Earth who could make sense of it. Men who would give anything short of their very lives to know the little that he knew, and could put it all to use.
Out among the stars lay a massive body of knowledge, some of it an extension of what mankind knew, some of it concerning matters which Man had not yet suspected, and used in ways and for purposes that Man had not as yet imagined. And never might imagine, if left on his own.

Albert Camus Foto

„The struggle itself toward the heights is enough to fill a man's heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.“

—  Albert Camus, buch Der Mythos des Sisyphos

Original French: La lutte elle-même vers les sommets suffit à remplir un cœur d'homme; il faut imaginer Sisyphe heureux.
Variant translation: The fight itself towards the summits suffices to fill a heart of man; it is necessary to imagine Sisyphus happy.
The Myth of Sisyphus (1942), The Myth of Sisyphus
Kontext: I leave Sisyphus at the foot of the mountain! One always finds one's burden again. But Sisyphus teaches the higher fidelity that negates the gods and raises rocks. He too concludes that all is well. This universe henceforth without a master seems to him neither sterile nor futile. Each atom of that stone, each mineral flake of that night filled mountain, in itself forms a world. The struggle itself toward the heights is enough to fill a man's heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.

„Calvin: Girls are like slugs—they probably serve some purpose, but it's hard to imagine what.
p71“

—  Bill Watterson American comic artist 1958

The Authoritative Calvin and Hobbes
Quelle: The Authoritative Calvin and Hobbes: A Calvin and Hobbes Treasury

Immanuel Kant Foto

„Happiness is not an ideal of reason but of imagination.“

—  Immanuel Kant German philosopher 1724 - 1804

Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Ethics (1785)

Jim Carrey Foto
Sherwood Anderson Foto

„The life of reality is confused, disorderly, almost always without apparent purpose, whereas in the artist's imaginative life there is purpose.“

—  Sherwood Anderson writer 1876 - 1941

"A Note on Realism" in The Literary Review (25 October 1924)<!-- also in Contemporary American Criticism (1926) -->
Kontext: The life of reality is confused, disorderly, almost always without apparent purpose, whereas in the artist's imaginative life there is purpose. There is determination to give the tale, the song, the painting, form — to make it true and real to the theme, not to life. Often the better the job is done, the greater the confusion. I myself remember with what a shock I heard people say that one of my own books Winesburg, Ohio was an exact picture of Ohio village life. The book was written in a crowded tenement district of Chicago. The hint for almost every character was taken from my fellow-lodgers in a large rooming house, many of whom had never lived in a village. The confusion arises out of the fact that others besides practicing artists have imaginations. But most people are afraid to trust their imaginations and the artist is not.
Would it not be better to have it understood that realism, in so far as the word means reality to life, is always bad art — although it may possibly be very good journalism? Which is but another way of saying that all of the so-called great realists were not realists at all and never intended being. Madame Bovary did not exist in fact. She existed in the imaginative life of Flaubert and he managed to make her exist also in the imaginative life of his readers.

Carl Sagan Foto

„The universe was made on purpose, the circle said.“

—  Carl Sagan, Contact

Quelle: Contact (1985), Chapter 24 (p. 431)
Kontext: The universe was made on purpose, the circle said. In whatever galaxy you happen to find yourself, you take the circumference of a circle, divide it by its diameter, measure closely enough, and uncover a miracle — another circle, drawn kilometers downstream of the decimal point. There would be richer messages farther in. It doesn't matter what you look like, or what you're made of, or where you come from. As long as you live in this universe, and have a modest talent for mathematics, sooner or later you'll find it. It's already here. It's inside everything. You don't have to leave your planet to find it. In the fabric of space and in the nature of matter, as in a great work of art, there is, written small, the artist’s signature. Standing over humans, gods, and demons, subsuming Caretakers and Tunnel builders, there is an intelligence that antedates the universe.

William Henry Davies Foto
Confucius Foto

„If a man has no humaneness what can his propriety be like? If a man has no humaneness what can his happiness be like?“

—  Confucius Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher -551 - -479 v.Chr

Original: (zh_Hant) 人而不仁、如禮何。人而不仁、如樂何。
Quelle: The Analects, Chapter III

Morrissey Foto

„It's the nicest birthday I've ever had. You've made a happy man very old.“

—  Morrissey English singer 1959

From Who Put The 'M' In Manchester? (2004)
In Concert

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