„At all times man approached his surroundings with wide open senses and a fertile intelligence, at all times he made incredible discoveries, at all times we can learn from his ideas.“

— Paul Feyerabend, Context: Combining this observation with the insight that science has no special method, we arrive at the result that the separation of science and non-science is not only artificial but also detrimental to the advancement of knowledge. If we want to understand nature, if we want to master our physical surroundings, then we must use all ideas, all methods, and not just a small selection of them. The assertion, however, that there is no knowledge outside science - extra scientiam nulla salus - is nothing but another and most convenient fairy-tale. Primitive tribes has more detailed classifications of animals and plant than contemporary scientific zoology and botany, they know remedies whose effectiveness astounds physicians (while the pharmaceutical industry already smells here a new source of income), they have means of influencing their fellow men which science for a long time regarded as non-existent (voodoo), they solve difficult problems in ways which are still not quite understood (building of the pyramids; Polynesian travels), there existed a highly developed and internationally known astronomy in the old Stone Age, this astronomy was factually adequate as well as emotionally satisfying, it solved both physical and social problems (one cannot say the same about modern astronomy) and it was tested in very simple and ingenious ways (stone observatories in England and in the South Pacific; astronomical schools in Polynesia - for a more details treatment an references concerning all these assertions cf. my Einfuhrung in die Naturphilosophie). There was the domestication of animals, the invention of rotating agriculture, new types of plants were bred and kept pure by careful avoidance of cross fertilization, we have chemical inventions, we have a most amazing art that can compare with the best achievement of the present. True, there were no collective excursions to the moon, but single individuals, disregarding great dangers to their soul and their sanity, rose from sphere to sphere to sphere until they finally faced God himself in all His splendor while others changed into animals and back into humans again. At all times man approached his surroundings with wide open senses and a fertile intelligence, at all times he made incredible discoveries, at all times we can learn from his ideas. Pg. 306-307

Paul Feyerabend Foto
Paul Feyerabend4
österreichischer Philosoph und Wissenschaftstheoretiker 1924 - 1994
Werbung

Ähnliche Zitate

Bob Marley Foto
Elizabeth Cady Stanton Foto

„Woman's degradation is in mans idea of his sexual rights. Our religion, laws, customs, are all founded on the belief that woman was made for man.“

— Elizabeth Cady Stanton Suffragist and Women's Rights activist 1815 - 1902
Context: Women's degradation is in man's idea of his sexual rights. Our religion, laws, customs, are all founded on the belief that woman was made for man. Come what will, my whole soul rejoices in the truth that I have uttered. Letter to Susan B. Anthony (1860-06-14).

Werbung
 Pericles Foto

„Time is the wisest counselor of all.“

—  Pericles Greek statesman, orator, and general of Athens -494 - -429 v.Chr
As quoted in Until Tomorrow Comes (1979) by Orville E. Kelly, p. 160

Kurt Cobain Foto
John Wesley Foto
Jackson Pollock Foto
Michael Jackson Foto
Werbung
Marie Curie Foto
Nicolás Gómez Dávila Foto
William Saroyan Foto

„Then swiftly, neatly, with the grace of the young man on the trapeze, he was gone from his body.
For an eternal moment he was still all things at once: the bird, the fish, the rodent, the reptile, and man.“

— William Saroyan American writer 1908 - 1981
Context: Then swiftly, neatly, with the grace of the young man on the trapeze, he was gone from his body. For an eternal moment he was still all things at once: the bird, the fish, the rodent, the reptile, and man. An ocean of print undulated endlessly and darkly before him. The city burned. The herded crowd rioted. The earth circled away, and knowing that he did so, he turned his lost face to the empty sky and became dreamless, unalive, perfect. "The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze"

Gilles Villeneuve Foto

„I will drive flat out all the time … I love racing.“

— Gilles Villeneuve Canadian racecar driver 1950 - 1982
Henry, pg. 25

Werbung
Carlos Castaneda Foto
Johnny Cash Foto
Diogenes of Sinope Foto

„To one who asked what was the proper time for lunch, he said, "If a rich man, when you will; if a poor man, when you can."“

— Diogenes of Sinope ancient Greek philosopher, one of the founders of the Cynic philosophy -404 - -322 v.Chr
Diogenes Laërtius, vi. 40

Nächster