„No iconoclast can possibly escape the severest criticism.“

—  Clarence Darrow, Voltaire (1916), Context: No iconoclast can possibly escape the severest criticism. If he is poor he is against existing things because he cannot succeed. If he is rich, he is not faithful to his ideals. The world always demands of a prophet a double standard. He must live a life consistent with his dreams, and at the same time must obey the conventions of the world. He cannot be judged either by one or the other, but must be judged by both.
Clarence Darrow Foto
Clarence Darrow
US-amerikanischer Rechtsanwalt 1857 - 1938
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„Silence is the severest criticism.“

—  Charles Buxton English brewer, philanthropist, writer and politician 1823 - 1871
Notes of Thought (1883), p. 57 Often misquoted as "Silence is sometimes the severest criticism."

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„And moody madness laughing wild
Amid severest woe.“

—  Thomas Gray English poet, historian 1716 - 1771
Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College http://www.thomasgray.org/cgi-bin/display.cgi?text=odec (written 1742–1750), St. 8

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„The severest justice may not always be the best policy.“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865
1860s, Veto message, eventually not executed, written as a response to the Second Confiscation Act passed by Congress. (17 July 1862) The Emancipation Proclamation, by John Hope Franklin, Doubleday Anchor Books, New York, NY, 1963, p. 19

Alice Moore Hubbard Foto

„Robert Ingersoll was humorist, iconoclast and lover of humanity.“

—  Alice Moore Hubbard American activist 1861 - 1915
An American Bible (1912), Context: Robert Ingersoll was humorist, iconoclast and lover of humanity. It is said that the difference between man and the lower animals is that man has the ability to laugh. When you laugh you relax, and when you relax you give freedom to muscles, nerves and brain-cells. Man seldom has use of his reason when his brain is tense. The sense of humor makes a condition where reason can act. Ingersoll knew that he must make his appeal to man's brain. Introduction.

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Frederick Douglass Foto

„I will, in the name of humanity which is outraged, in the name of liberty which is fettered, in the name of the constitution and the Bible, which are disregarded and trampled upon, dare to call in question and to denounce, with all the emphasis I can command, everything that serves to perpetuate slavery — the great sin and shame of America! "I will not equivocate; I will not excuse;" I will use the severest language I can command; and yet not one word shall escape me that any man, whose judgement is not blinded by prejudice, or who is not at heart a slaveholder, shall not confess to be right and just.“

—  Frederick Douglass American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman 1818 - 1895
1850s, What to the Slave is the Fourth of July? (1852), Context: I shall see, this day, and its popular characteristics, from the slave's point of view. Standing, there, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this 4th of July! Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the professions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting. America is false to the past, false to the present, and solemnly binds herself to be false to the future. Standing with God and the crushed and bleeding slave on this occasion, I will, in the name of humanity which is outraged, in the name of liberty which is fettered, in the name of the constitution and the Bible, which are disregarded and trampled upon, dare to call in question and to denounce, with all the emphasis I can command, everything that serves to perpetuate slavery — the great sin and shame of America! "I will not equivocate; I will not excuse;" I will use the severest language I can command; and yet not one word shall escape me that any man, whose judgement is not blinded by prejudice, or who is not at heart a slaveholder, shall not confess to be right and just. Douglass here quotes William Lloyd Garrison, who famously declared in the first issue of The Liberator: "I am in earnest — I will not equivocate — I will not excuse — I will not retreat a single inch — AND I WILL BE HEARD."

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