„Some philosophers fail to distinguish propositions from judgments; … But in the real world it is more important that a proposition be interesting than that it be true.“

Quelle: 1920s, Process and Reality: An Essay in Cosmology (1929), p. 259.
Variant: It is more important that a proposition be interesting than that it be true. This statement is almost a tautology. For the energy of operation of a proposition in an occasion of experience is its interest, and its importance. But of course a true proposition is more apt to be interesting than a false one.
As extended upon in Adventures of Ideas (1933), Pt. 4, Ch. 16.
Kontext: Some philosophers fail to distinguish propositions from judgments; … But in the real world it is more important that a proposition be interesting than that it be true. The importance of truth is that it adds to interest.

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Alfred North Whitehead Foto
Alfred North Whitehead6
britischer Philosoph und Mathematiker 1861 - 1947

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Charles Sanders Peirce Foto

„To "postulate" a proposition is no more than to hope it is true.“

—  Charles Sanders Peirce American philosopher, logician, mathematician, and scientist 1839 - 1914

The Doctrine of Necessity Examined (1892)
Kontext: When I have asked thinking men what reason they had to believe that every fact in the universe is precisely determined by law, the first answer has usually been that the proposition is a "presupposition " or postulate of scientific reasoning. Well, if that is the best that can be said for it, the belief is doomed. Suppose it be " postulated " : that does not make it true, nor so much as afford the slightest rational motive for yielding it any credence. It is as if a man should come to borrow money, and when asked for his security, should reply he "postulated " the loan. To "postulate" a proposition is no more than to hope it is true. There are, indeed, practical emergencies in which we act upon assumptions of certain propositions as true, because if they are not so, it can make no difference how we act. But all such propositions I take to be hypotheses of individual facts. For it is manifest that no universal principle can in its universality be compromised in a special case or can be requisite for the validity of any ordinary inference.

Arthur Stanley Eddington Foto
Sören Kierkegaard Foto

„It is perfectly true, as the philosophers say, that life must be understood backwards. But they forget the other proposition, that it must be lived forwards.“

—  Sören Kierkegaard Danish philosopher and theologian, founder of Existentialism 1813 - 1855

Journals IV A 164 (1843)
See Phenomenology: Critical Concepts in Philosophy, by Dermot Moran (2002)
Variants:
We live forward, but we understand backward.
Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.
1840s, The Journals of Søren Kierkegaard, 1840s
Original: (da) Det er ganske sandt, hvad Philosophien siger, at Livet maa forstaaes baglænds. Men derover glemmer man den anden Sætning, at det maa leves forlænds.

Bertrand Russell Foto

„Pure mathematics consists entirely of assertions to the effect that, if such and such a proposition is true of anything, then such and such another proposition is true of that thing.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

Recent Work on the Principles of Mathematics, published in International Monthly, Vol. 4 (1901), later published as "Mathematics and the Metaphysicians" in Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays (1917)
1900s
Kontext: Pure mathematics consists entirely of assertions to the effect that, if such and such a proposition is true of anything, then such and such another proposition is true of that thing. It is essential not to discuss whether the first proposition is really true, and not to mention what the anything is, of which it is supposed to be true. Both these points would belong to applied mathematics. We start, in pure mathematics, from certain rules of inference, by which we can infer that if one proposition is true, then so is some other proposition. These rules of inference constitute the major part of the principles of formal logic. We then take any hypothesis that seems amusing, and deduce its consequences. If our hypothesis is about anything, and not about some one or more particular things, then our deductions constitute mathematics. Thus mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true. People who have been puzzled by the beginnings of mathematics will, I hope, find comfort in this definition, and will probably agree that it is accurate.

Friedrich Nietzsche Foto
Alfred Jules Ayer Foto
Bertrand Russell Foto
Ludwig Wittgenstein Foto

„It is quite impossible for a proposition to state that it itself is true.“

—  Ludwig Wittgenstein Austrian-British philosopher 1889 - 1951

4.442
Original German: Ein Satz kann unmöglich von sich selbst aussagen, dass er wahr ist.
1920s, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1922)

Frank P. Ramsey Foto
William of Ockham Foto
Ludwig Wittgenstein Foto

„Propositions are truth-functions of elementary propositions. (An elementary proposition is a truth-function of itself.) (5)“

—  Ludwig Wittgenstein Austrian-British philosopher 1889 - 1951

Original German: Der Satz ist eine Wahrheitsfunktion der Elementarsätze
1920s, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1922)

George Boole Foto

„Let x represent an act of the mind by which we fix our regard upon that portion of time for which the proposition X is true; and let this meaning be understood when it is asserted that x denote the time for which the proposition X is true. (...) We shall term x the representative symbol of the proposition X.“

—  George Boole English mathematician, philosopher and logician 1815 - 1864

Quelle: 1850s, An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854), p. 165; As cited in: James Joseph Sylvester, ‎James Whitbread Lee Glaisher (1910) The Quarterly Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics. p. 350

David Hume Foto
John Napier Foto

„22 Proposition. The Woman clad with the Sunne (chap. 12) is the true Church of God.“

—  John Napier Scottish mathematician 1550 - 1617

A Plaine Discovery of the Whole Revelation of St. John (1593), The First and Introductory Treatise

Haruki Murakami Foto

„This may be the most important proposition revealed by history: 'At the time, no one knew what was coming.“

—  Haruki Murakami, buch 1Q84

Variante: This may be the most important proposition revealed by history: At the time, no one knew what was coming.
Quelle: 1Q84

Ludwig Wittgenstein Foto
Aristarchus of Samos Foto

„Proposition 6. The moon moves (in an orbit) lower than (that of) the sun, and, when it is halved, is distant less than a quadrant from the sun.“

—  Aristarchus of Samos ancient Greek astronomer and mathematician

p, 125
On the Sizes and Distances of the Sun and the Moon (c. 250 BC)

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