„No law that ever darkened white paper in the printing can lay down a rule of conduct for all men to follow alike.“

Kontext: You cannot judge all men by the one standard, any more than you can make shoes for all of them on the same last. No law that ever darkened white paper in the printing can lay down a rule of conduct for all men to follow alike.

Letzte Aktualisierung 22. Mai 2020. Geschichte
Terence Vincent Powderly Foto
Terence Vincent Powderly
US-amerikanischer Gewerkschafter, Bürgermeister, Anwalt 1849 - 1924

Ähnliche Zitate

Theodore Parker Foto

„Justice is the constitution or fundamental law of the moral universe, the law of right, a rule of conduct for man in all his moral relations.“

—  Theodore Parker abolitionist 1810 - 1860

Ten Sermons of Religion (1853), III : Of Justice and the Conscience https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Ten_Sermons_of_Religion/Of_Justice_and_the_Conscience
Kontext: Justice is the constitution or fundamental law of the moral universe, the law of right, a rule of conduct for man in all his moral relations. Accordingly all human affairs must be subject to that as the law paramount; what is right agrees therewith and stands, what is wrong conflicts and falls. Private cohesions of self-love, of friendship, or of patriotism, must all be subordinate to this universal gravitation towards the eternal right.

Émile Durkheim Foto

„Methodological rules are for science what rules of law and custom are for conduct.“

—  Émile Durkheim French sociologist (1858-1917) 1858 - 1917

Quelle: The Division of Labor in Society (1893), p. 364

Chief Joseph Foto

„We ask to be recognized as men. We ask that the same law shall work alike on all men.“

—  Chief Joseph Nez Percé Chieftain 1840 - 1904

Lincoln Hall Speech (1879)
Kontext: I know that my race must change. We cannot hold our own with the white men as we are. We only ask an even chance to live as other men live. We ask to be recognized as men. We ask that the same law shall work alike on all men. If an Indian breaks the law, punish him by the law. If a white man breaks the law, punish him also.

Chief Joseph Foto
Peter Kropotkin Foto

„The law is an adroit mixture of customs that are beneficial to society, and could be followed even if no law existed, and others that are of advantage to a ruling minority, but harmful to the masses of men, and can be enforced on them only by terror.“

—  Peter Kropotkin Russian zoologist, evolutionary theorist, philosopher, scientist, revolutionary, economist, activist, geographer, writer 1842 - 1921

"Words of a Rebel"; as quoted in The Heretic's Handbook of Quotations: Cutting Comments on Burning Issues (1992) by Charles Bufe, p. 26

Arundhati Roy Foto
Marcus Aurelius Foto
Oliver Goldsmith Foto

„Laws grind the poor, and rich men rule the law.“

—  Oliver Goldsmith Irish physician and writer 1728 - 1774

Quelle: The Traveller (1764), Line 386.

Theodore Roosevelt Foto
Chief Joseph Foto

„Treat all men alike. Give them the same laws. Give them all an even chance to live and grow. All men were made by the same Great Spirit Chief. They are all brothers.“

—  Chief Joseph Nez Percé Chieftain 1840 - 1904

Lincoln Hall Speech (1879)
Kontext: Too many misinterpretations have been made; too many misunderstandings have come up between the white men and the Indians. If the white man wants to live in peace with the Indian he can live in peace. There need be no trouble. Treat all men alike. Give them the same laws. Give them all an even chance to live and grow. All men were made by the same Great Spirit Chief. They are all brothers. The earth is the mother of all people, and all people should have equal rights upon it. You might as well expect all rivers to run backward as that any man who was born a free man should be contented penned up and denied liberty to go where he pleases. If you tie a horse to a stake, do you expect he will grow fat? If you pen an Indian up on a small spot of earth and compel him to stay there, he will not be contented nor will he grow and prosper. I have asked some of the Great White Chiefs where they get their authority to say to the Indian that he shall stay in one place, while he sees white men going where they please. They cannot tell me.

Blaise Pascal Foto
The Mother Foto

„They do not feel bound by the customary rules of conduct and have not yet found an inner law that would replace them.“

—  The Mother spiritual collaborator of Sri Aurobindo 1878 - 1973

On artists whom she had often found of rather loose morals, quoted in "Paris (1897-1904)" and in Mother India, Volume 20 (1968) http://books.google.co.in/books?id=YifkAAAAMAAJ, p. 46

Robert Sheckley Foto
Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury Foto

„We must learn this rule, which is true alike of rich and poor — that no man and no class of men ever rise to any permanent improvement in their condition of body or of mind except by relying upon their own personal efforts.“

—  Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury British politician 1830 - 1903

Speech to Devonshire Conservatives (January 1892), as quoted in The Marquis of Salisbury (1892), by James J. Ellis, p. 185
Variant: The only true lasting benefit which the statesman can give to the poor man is so to shape matters that the greatest possible liberty for the exercise of his own moral and intellectual qualities should be offered to him by law.
As quoted in Salisbury — Victorian Titan (1999) by Andrew Roberts
1890s
Kontext: We must learn this rule, which is true alike of rich and poor — that no man and no class of men ever rise to any permanent improvement in their condition of body or of mind except by relying upon their own personal efforts. The wealth with which the rich man is surrounded is constantly tempting him to forget the truth, ad you see in family after family men degenerating from the position of their fathers because they live sluggishly and enjoy what has been placed before them without appealing to their own exertions. The poor man, especially in these days, may have a similar temptation offered to him by legislation, but this same inexorable rule will work. The only true lasting benefit which the statesman can give to the poor man is so to shape matters that the greatest possible opportunity for the exercise of his own moral and intellectual qualities shall be offered to him by the law; and therefore it is that in my opinion nothing that we can do this year, and nothing that we did before, will equal in the benefit that it will confer upon the physical condition, and with the physical will follow the moral too, of the labouring classes in the rural districts, that measure for free education which we passed last year. It will have the effect of bringing education home to many a family which hitherto has not been able to enjoy it, and in that way, by developing the faculties which nature has given to them, it will be a far surer and a far more valuable aid to extricate them from any of the sufferings or hardships to which they may be exposed than the most lavish gifts of mere sustenance that the State could offer.

Thucydides Foto
Edward Bellamy Foto
Frederick Douglass Foto

„Can any colored man, or any white man friendly to the freedom of all men, ever forget the night which followed the first day of January 1863, when the world was to see if Abraham Lincoln would prove to be as good as his word? I shall never forget that memorable night“

—  Frederick Douglass American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman 1818 - 1895

1870s, Oratory in Memory of Abraham Lincoln (1876)
Kontext: Can any colored man, or any white man friendly to the freedom of all men, ever forget the night which followed the first day of January 1863, when the world was to see if Abraham Lincoln would prove to be as good as his word? I shall never forget that memorable night, when in a distant city I waited and watched at a public meeting, with three thousand others not less anxious than myself, for the word of deliverance which we have heard read today. Nor shall I ever forget the outburst of joy and thanksgiving that rent the air when the lightning brought to us the emancipation proclamation. In that happy hour we forgot all delay, and forgot all tardiness, forgot that the President had bribed the rebels to lay down their arms by a promise to withhold the bolt which would smite the slave-system with destruction; and we were thenceforward willing to allow the President all the latitude of time, phraseology, and every honorable device that statesmanship might require for the achievement of a great and beneficent measure of liberty and progress.

John Steinbeck Foto
Paolo Bacigalupi Foto
Albrecht Thaer Foto

Ähnliche Themen