„p>Come not, when I am dead,
To drop thy foolish tears upon my grave,
To trample round my fallen head,
And vex the unhappy dust thou wouldst not save.
There let the wind sweep and the plover cry;
But thou, go by.Child, if it were thine error or thy crime
I care no longer, being all unblest:
Wed whom thou wilt, but I am sick of Time,
And I desire to rest.
Pass on, weak heart, and leave me where I lie:
Go by, go by.</p“

"Come not, when I am dead" (1850)

Letzte Aktualisierung 22. Mai 2020. Geschichte
Alfred Tennyson Foto
Alfred Tennyson1
britischer Dichter 1809 - 1892
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Letitia Elizabeth Landon Foto
Christina Rossetti Foto
Richard Lovelace Foto
Henry Van Dyke Foto
James Macpherson Foto
William Alexander Foto
Julian of Norwich Foto

„I IT AM, I IT AM: I IT AM that is highest, I IT AM that thou lovest, I IT AM that thou enjoyest, I IT AM that thou servest, I IT AM that thou longest for, I IT AM that thou desirest, I IT AM that thou meanest, I IT AM that is all. I IT AM that Holy Church preacheth and teacheth thee, I IT AM that shewed me here to thee. The number of the words passeth my wit and all my understanding and all my powers. And they are the highest, as to my sight: for therein is comprehended — I cannot tell, — but the joy that I saw in the Shewing of them passeth all that heart may wish for and soul may desire. Therefore the words be not declared here; but every man after the grace that God giveth him in understanding and loving, receive them in our Lord’s meaning.“

—  Julian of Norwich English theologian and anchoress 1342 - 1416

The Twelfth Revelation, Chapter 26
Kontext: After this our Lord shewed Himself more glorified, as to my sight, than I saw Him before wherein I was learned that our soul shall never have rest till it cometh to Him, knowing that He is fulness of joy, homely and courteous, blissful and very life.
Our Lord Jesus oftentimes said: I IT AM, I IT AM: I IT AM that is highest, I IT AM that thou lovest, I IT AM that thou enjoyest, I IT AM that thou servest, I IT AM that thou longest for, I IT AM that thou desirest, I IT AM that thou meanest, I IT AM that is all. I IT AM that Holy Church preacheth and teacheth thee, I IT AM that shewed me here to thee. The number of the words passeth my wit and all my understanding and all my powers. And they are the highest, as to my sight: for therein is comprehended — I cannot tell, — but the joy that I saw in the Shewing of them passeth all that heart may wish for and soul may desire. Therefore the words be not declared here; but every man after the grace that God giveth him in understanding and loving, receive them in our Lord’s meaning.

Friedrich Schiller Foto

„Wouldst thou know thyself, observe the actions of others.
Wouldst thou other men know, look thou within thine own heart.“

—  Friedrich Schiller German poet, philosopher, historian, and playwright 1759 - 1805

Tabulae Votivae (Votive Tablets) (1796), "The Key"; tr. Edgar Alfred Bowring, The Poems of Schiller, Complete (1851)
Variant translation:[citation needed]
If you want to know yourself,
Just look how others do it;
If you want to understand others,
Look into your own heart

Augustus Toplady Foto
Anne Brontë Foto

„I know I owe my all to Thee,
O, take this heart I cannot give.
Do Thou my Strength my Saviour be;
And make me to Thy glory live!“

—  Anne Brontë, buch Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell

Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell (1846), A Prayer (1844)

Matthew Lewis (writer) Foto

„Farewel, thou cruel world! – to morrow
No more thy scorn my heart shall tear: –
The grave will shield the child of sorrow,
And heaven will hear the orphan's prayer.“

—  Matthew Lewis (writer) English novelist and dramatist 1775 - 1818

"The Orphan's Prayer", line 29; cited from Titus Strong (ed.) The Common Reader (Greenfield, Mass.: Denio & Phelps, 1819) p. 174.

Voltairine de Cleyre Foto

„Fair, cold, and faithless wert thou, my own!
For that I love
Thy heart of stone!“

—  Voltairine de Cleyre American anarchist writer and feminist 1866 - 1912

"The Dirge of the Sea" (April 1891)
Kontext: Years! Years, ye shall mix with me!
Ye shall grow a part
Of the laughing Sea;
Of the moaning heart
Of the glittered wave
Of the sun-gleam's dart
In the ocean-grave. Fair, cold, and faithless wert thou, my own!
For that I love
Thy heart of stone!
From the heights above
To the depths below,
Where dread things move, There is naught can show
A life so trustless! Proud be thy crown!
Ruthless, like none, save the Sea, alone!

William Morris Foto
Aurelius Augustinus Foto

„Once for all, then, a short precept is given thee: Love, and do what thou wilt: whether thou hold thy peace, through love hold thy peace; whether thou cry out, through love cry out; whether thou correct, through love correct; whether thou spare, through love do thou spare: let the root of love be within, of this root can nothing spring but what is good.“

—  Aurelius Augustinus early Christian theologian and philosopher 354 - 430

Tractatus VII, 8 http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/170207.htm
Latin: "dilige et quod vis fac."; falsely often: "ama et fac quod vis."
Translation by Professor Joseph Fletcher: Love and then what you will, do.
In epistolam Ioannis ad Parthos

Johann Gottlieb Fichte Foto
Gemma Galgani Foto
Elizabeth Barrett Browning Foto

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