„Comparative religion and philosophy show that the Thinker can regard itself as mortal, as immortal, as both mortal and immortal (the reincarnation model) or even as non-existent (Buddhism).“

—  Robert Anton Wilson, buch Prometheus Rising

Quelle: Prometheus Rising (1983), Ch. 1 : The Thinker & The Prover, p. 25
Kontext: Comparative religion and philosophy show that the Thinker can regard itself as mortal, as immortal, as both mortal and immortal (the reincarnation model) or even as non-existent (Buddhism). It can think itself into living in a Christian universe, a Marxist universe, a scientific-relativistic universe, or a Nazi universe—among many possibilities.
As psychiatrists and psychologists have often observed (much to the chagrin of their medical colleagues), the Thinker can think itself sick, and can even think itself well again.
The Prover is a much simpler mechanism. It operates on one law only: Whatever the Thinker thinks, the Prover proves.
To cite a notorious example which unleashed incredible horrors earlier in this century, if the Thinker thinks that all Jews are rich, the Prover will prove it. It will find evidence that the poorest Jew in the most run-down ghetto has hidden money somewhere.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Robert Anton Wilson Foto
Robert Anton Wilson2
US-amerikanischer Bestsellerautor, Philosoph und Anarchist 1932 - 2007

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Steven Erikson Foto

„Play on, mortal. Every god falls at a mortal’s hands. Such is the only end to immortality.“

—  Steven Erikson, buch Gardens of the Moon

Quelle: Gardens of the Moon (1999), Chapter 7 (p. 208)

Tad Williams Foto

„As with all dwellings,” she said, “of mortals and immortals both, it is the living that makes a house—not the doors, not the walls.“

—  Tad Williams novelist 1957

Quelle: Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn, Stone of Farewell (1990), Chapter 25, “Petals in a Wind Storm” (pp. 626-627).

Pindar Foto

„Law, the king of all mortals and immortals.“

—  Pindar Ancient Greek poet -517 - -437 v.Chr

As quoted in Plato's Gorgias, 484b.

Pythagoras Foto

„Reason is immortal, all else mortal.“

—  Pythagoras ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher -585 - -495 v.Chr

As quoted in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, Sect. 30, as translated by Robert Drew Hicks (1925); also in The Demon and the Quantum: From the Pythagorean Mystics to Maxwell's Demon (2007) by Robert J. Scully, Marlan O. Scully, p. 11

Charles Lindbergh Foto

„The river was mortal and immortal as life, as becoming.“

—  Charles Lindbergh American aviator, author, inventor, explorer, and social activist 1902 - 1974

Autobiography of Values (1978)
Kontext: I know myself as mortal, but this raises the question: "What is I?" Am I an individual, or am I an evolving life stream composed of countless selves? … As one identity, I was born in AD 1902. But as AD twentieth-century man, I am billions of years old. The life I consider as myself has existed though past eons with unbroken continuity. Individuals are custodians of the life stream — temporal manifestations of far greater being, forming from and returning to their essence like so many dreams. … I recall standing on the edge of a deep valley in the Hawaiian island of Maui, thinking that the life stream is like a mountain river — springing from hidden sources, born out of the earth, touched by stars, merging, blending, evolving in the shape momentarily seen. It is molecules probing through time, found smooth-flowing, adjusted to shaped and shaping banks, roiled by rocks and tree trunks — composed again. Now it ends, apparently, at a lava brink, a precipitous fall.
Near the fall's brink, I saw death as death cannot be seen. I stared at the very end of life, and at life that forms beyond, at the fact of immortality. Dark water bent, broke, disintegrated, transformed to apparition — a tall, stately ghost soul emerged from body, and the finite individuality of the whole becomes the infinite individuality of particles. Mist drifted, disappeared in air, a vanishing of spirit. Far below in the valley, I saw another river, reincarnated from the first, its particles reorganized to form a second body. It carried the same name. It was similar in appearance. It also ended at a lava brink. Flow followed fall, and fall followed flow as I descended the mountainside. The river was mortal and immortal as life, as becoming.

Hazrat Inayat Khan Foto

„Sufism is a religion if one wishes to learn religion from it. But it is beyond religion, for it is the light, the sustenance of every soul, raising the mortal being to immortality.“

—  Hazrat Inayat Khan Indian Sufi 1882 - 1927

Vol. I, The Way of Illumination, Section I - The Way of Illumination, Part III : The Sufi.
The Spiritual Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan
Kontext: The religion of the Sufi is not separate from the religions of the world. People have fought in vain about the names and lives of their saviors, and have named their religions after the name of their savior, instead of uniting with each other in the truth that is taught. This truth can be traced in all religions, whether one community calls another pagan or infidel or heathen. Such persons claim that theirs is the only scripture, and their place of worship the only abode of God. Sufism is a name applied to a certain philosophy by those who do not accept the philosophy; hence it cannot really be described as a religion; it contains a religion but is not itself a religion. Sufism is a religion if one wishes to learn religion from it. But it is beyond religion, for it is the light, the sustenance of every soul, raising the mortal being to immortality.

Walter Savage Landor Foto

„Tis verse that gives
Immortal youth to mortal maids.“

—  Walter Savage Landor British writer 1775 - 1864

Verse.

Dinah Craik Foto

„Immortality alone could teach this mortal how to die.“

—  Dinah Craik English novelist and poet 1826 - 1887

"Looking Death in the Face", Miss Mulock's Poems (1866)

Margaret Atwood Foto
Anne Rice Foto
Borís Pasternak Foto

„The idea that underlies this is that communion between mortals is immortal, and that the whole of life is symbolic because it is meaningful.“

—  Borís Pasternak, buch Doktor Schiwago

Book One, Ch. 2 : A Girl from a Different World, § 10, as translated by Max Hayward and Manya Harari (1958)
Variant translations:
I think that if the beast dormant in man could be stopped by the threat of, whatever, the lockup or requital beyond the grave, the highest emblem of mankind would be a lion tamer with his whip, and not the preacher who sacrifices himself. But the point is precisely this, that for centuries man has been raised above the animals and borne aloft not by the rod, but by music: the irresistibility of the unarmed truth, the attraction of its example. It has been considered up to now that the most important thing in the Gospels is the moral pronouncements and rules, but for me the main thing is that Christ speaks in parables from daily life, clarifying the truth with the light of everyday things. At the basis of this lies the thought that communion among mortals is immortal and that life is symbolic because it is meaningful.
Book One, Part 2 : A Girl from a Different World, § 10, as translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky (2010)
I think that if the beast who sleeps in man could be held down by threats of any kind, whether of jail or retribution, then the highest emblem of humanity would be the lion tamer, not the prophet who sacrificed himself.... What for centuries raised man above the beast is not the cudgel but the irresistible power of unarmed truth.
Paraphrase of the 1958 translation, as quoted in The New York Times (1 January 1978)
Doctor Zhivago (1957)
Kontext: I think that if the beast who sleeps in man could be held down by threats — any kind of threat, whether of jail or of retribution after death — then the highest emblem of humanity would be the lion tamer in the circus with his whip, not the prophet who sacrificed himself. But don’t you see, this is just the point — what has for centuries raised man above the beast is not the cudgel but an inward music: the irresistible power of unarmed truth, the powerful attraction of its example. It has always been assumed that the most important things in the Gospels are the ethical maxims and commandments. But for me the most important thing is that Christ speaks in parables taken from life, that He explains the truth in terms of everyday reality. The idea that underlies this is that communion between mortals is immortal, and that the whole of life is symbolic because it is meaningful.

Vanna Bonta Foto

„What I saw was the hoax: Immortals questioning mortality when they should have asked eternity.“

—  Vanna Bonta Italian-American writer, poet, inventor, actress, voice artist (1958-2014) 1958 - 2014

"She's Dead?"
Shades of the World (1985)

Sylvester Stallone Foto

„Once in one's life, for one mortal moment, one must make a grab for immortality; if not, one has not lived“

—  Sylvester Stallone American actor, screenwriter, and film director 1946

Sylvester Stallone, interviewed by Rob Carnevale in " Sylvester Stallone: Rocky Balboa http://www.bbc.co.uk/films/2007/01/15/sylvester_stallone_rocky_balboa_2007_interview.shtml", BBC (28 October 2014).

Livy Foto

„There is an old saying which, from its truth, has become proverbial, that friendships should be immortal, enmities mortal.“

—  Livy Roman historian -59 - 17 v.Chr

Book XL, sec. 46
History of Rome

Jeet Thayil Foto
Samuel Butler Foto

„Every new idea has something of the pain and peril of childbirth about it; ideas are just as mortal and just as immortal as organised beings are.“

—  Samuel Butler novelist 1835 - 1902

New Ideas
The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1912), Part VII - On the Making of Music, Pictures, and Books

Sri Aurobindo Foto
E.E. Cummings Foto
Adam Smith Foto

„But though empires, like all the other works of men, have all hitherto proved mortal, yet every empire aims at immortality.“

—  Adam Smith Scottish moral philosopher and political economist 1723 - 1790

Quelle: (1776), Book V, Chapter II, Part II, p. 896.

Thomas Hobbes Foto

„This is the Generation of that LEVIATHAN, or rather (to speake more reverently)of that Mortall God, to which we owe under the Immortal God, our peace and defence.“

—  Thomas Hobbes, buch Leviathan

The Second Part, Chapter 17, p. 87 (See also: Ten Commandments).
Leviathan (1651)
Kontext: I Authorize and give up my Right of Governing my selfe, to this Man, or to his Assembly of men, on this condition, that thou that give up thy Right to him, and Authorise all his Actionsin like manner. This done, the Multitude so united in one Person, is called a COMMON-WEALTH, in latine CIVITAS. This is the Generation of that LEVIATHAN, or rather (to speake more reverently)of that Mortall God, to which we owe under the Immortal God, our peace and defence.

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