„It is not unscientific to make a guess, although many people who are not in science think it is.“

—  Richard Feynman, buch The Character of Physical Law

Quelle: The Character of Physical Law (1965), chapter 7, “Seeking New Laws,” p. 165-166: video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2NnquxdWFk&t=37m21s
Kontext: It is not unscientific to make a guess, although many people who are not in science think it is. Some years ago I had a conversation with a layman about flying saucers — because I am scientific I know all about flying saucers! I said “I don’t think there are flying saucers”. So my antagonist said, “Is it impossible that there are flying saucers? Can you prove that it’s impossible?” “No”, I said, “I can’t prove it’s impossible. It’s just very unlikely”. At that he said, “You are very unscientific. If you can’t prove it impossible then how can you say that it’s unlikely?” But that is the way that is scientific. It is scientific only to say what is more likely and what less likely, and not to be proving all the time the possible and impossible. To define what I mean, I might have said to him, "Listen, I mean that from my knowledge of the world that I see around me, I think that it is much more likely that the reports of flying saucers are the results of the known irrational characteristics of terrestrial intelligence than of the unknown rational efforts of extra-terrestrial intelligence." It is just more likely. That is all.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Richard Feynman Foto
Richard Feynman4
US-amerikanischer Physiker und Nobelpreisträger des Jahres … 1918 - 1988

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„Although many of us may think of ourselves as thinking creatures that feel, biologically we are feeling creatures that think“

—  Jill Bolte Taylor American neuroscientist 1959

Quelle: My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist's Personal Journey

Kurt Vonnegut Foto
Susan Sontag Foto

„I guess I think I'm writing for people who are smarter than I am, because then I'll be doing something that's worth their time.“

—  Susan Sontag American writer and filmmaker, professor, and activist 1933 - 2004

"The Risk Taker" http://books.guardian.co.uk/departments/politicsphilosophyandsociety/story/0,,635799,00.html, profile/interview by Gary Younge, The Guardian (19 January 2002)
Kontext: I guess I think I'm writing for people who are smarter than I am, because then I'll be doing something that's worth their time. I'd be very afraid to write from a position where I consciously thought I was smarter than most of my readers.

A.E. Housman Foto

„It is supposed that there has been progress in the science of textual criticism, and the most frivolous pretender has learned to talk superciliously about "the old unscientific days."“

—  A.E. Housman English classical scholar and poet 1859 - 1936

The old unscientific days are everlasting; they are here and now; they are renewed perennially by the ear which takes formulas in, and the tongue which gives them out again, and the mind which meanwhile is empty of reflexion and stuffed with self-complacency.
"The Application of Thought to Textual Criticism", a lecture delivered on August 4, 1921

W. Mark Felt Foto

„I guess people used to think Deep Throat was a criminal, but now they think he's a hero.“

—  W. Mark Felt Whistleblower who exposed the Watergate scandal 1913 - 2008

Statement to his daughter, Joan Felt; reported by his grandson, Nick Jones in a public statement of his personal family. (31 May 2005)

Peace Pilgrim Foto

„I HAD A VERY FAVORABLE BEGINNING, although many of you might not think so.“

—  Peace Pilgrim American non-denominational spiritual teacher 1908 - 1981

Quelle: Peace Pilgrim: Her Life and Work in Her Own Words (1982), Ch. 1 : Growing Up
Kontext: I HAD A VERY FAVORABLE BEGINNING, although many of you might not think so. I was born poor on a small farm on the outskirts of a small town, and I'm thankful for that. I was happy in my childhood. I had a woods to play in and a creek to swim in and room to grow. I wish that every child could have growing space because I think children are a little like plants. If they grow too close together they become thin and sickly and never obtain maximum growth. We need room to grow.

Ja'far al-Sadiq Foto

„It makes no sense at all if people consider the one who lacks knowledge and science as a prosperous person.“

—  Ja'far al-Sadiq Muslim religious person 702 - 765

Ibn Shu’ba al-Harrani, Tuhaf al-'Uqul, p. 382
Regarding Knowledge & Wisdom, General

Andy Rooney Foto

„I wish people who sell things would stop trying to guess how many of something we want to buy. I want to buy things one at a time.“

—  Andy Rooney writer, humorist, television personality 1919 - 2011

[Andy Rooney, w:Andy Rooney, 9, Twofers, Years of Minutes, 2003, PublicAffairs, 978-1586482114]

Bassel Khartabil Foto

„activists who think they are making changes in their countries are not. the people on the ground are the ones who make that #Syria“

—  Bassel Khartabil free culture and democracy activist, Syrian political prisoner 1981 - 2015

Tweet Jan 31, 2012, 6:29AM https://twitter.com/basselsafadi/status/164354595982819329 at Twitter.com

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„There are very many people who read simply to prevent themselves from thinking.“

—  Georg Christoph Lichtenberg German scientist, satirist 1742 - 1799

G 29
Aphorisms (1765-1799), Notebook G (1779-1783)

Friedrich Engels Foto

„Political economy came into being as a natural result of the expansion of trade, and with its appearance elementary, unscientific huckstering was replaced by a developed system of licensed fraud, an entire science of enrichment.“

—  Friedrich Engels German social scientist, author, political theorist, and philosopher 1820 - 1895

Die Nationalökonomie entstand als eine natürliche Folge der Ausdehnung des Handels, und mit ihr trat an die Stelle des einfachen, unwissenschaftlichen Schachers ein ausgebildetes System des erlaubten Betrugs, eine komplette Bereicherungswissenschaft.
Outlines of a Critique of Political Economy (1844)

Stuart A. Umpleby Foto
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Jacob Bronowski Foto

„Those who think that science is ethically neutral confuse the findings of science, which are, with the activity of science, which is not.“

—  Jacob Bronowski Polish-born British mathematician 1908 - 1974

Part 3: "The Sense of Human Dignity", §6 (p. 63–64)
Science and Human Values (1956, 1965)
Kontext: Tolerance among scientists cannot be based on indifference, it must be based on respect. Respect as a personal value implies, in any society, the public acknowledgements of justice and of due honor. These are values which to the layman seem most remote from any abstract study. Justice, honor, the respect of man for man: What, he asks, have these human values to do with science? [... ]
Those who think that science is ethically neutral confuse the findings of science, which are, with the activity of science, which is not.

Richard Feynman Foto

„In general, we look for a new law by the following process: First we guess it. Then we – now don't laugh, that's really true. Then we compute the consequences of the guess to see what, if this is right, if this law that we guessed is right, to see what it would imply. And then we compare the computation results to nature, or we say compare to experiment or experience, compare it directly with observations to see if it works. If it disagrees with experiment, it's wrong. In that simple statement is the key to science. It doesn't make any difference how beautiful your guess is, it doesn't make any difference how smart you are, who made the guess, or what his name is. If it disagrees with experiment, it's wrong. That's all there is to it.“

—  Richard Feynman, buch The Character of Physical Law

same passage in transcript: video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2NnquxdWFk&t=16m46s
The Character of Physical Law (1965)
Variante: In general we look for a new law by the following process. First we guess it. Then we compute the consequences of the guess to see what would be implied if this law that we guessed is right. Then we compare the result of the computation to nature, with experiment or experience, compare it directly with observation, to see if it works. If it disagrees with experiment it is wrong. In that simple statement is the key to science. It does not make any difference how beautiful your guess is. It does not make any difference how smart you are, who made the guess, or what his name is – if it disagrees with experiment it is wrong. That is all there is to it.

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