„Their thinking it right, and our thinking it wrong, is the precise fact upon which depends the whole controversy.“

1860s, Allow the humblest man an equal chance (1860)
Kontext: Slavery is wrong. If Slavery is right, all words, acts, laws, and Constitutions against it, are themselves wrong, and should be silenced, and swept away. If it is right, we cannot justly object to its nationality — its universality; if it is wrong they cannot justly insist upon its extension — its enlargement. All they ask, we could readily grant, if we thought Slavery right; all we ask, they could as readily grant, if they thought it wrong. Their thinking it right, and our thinking it wrong, is the precise fact upon which depends the whole controversy. Thinking it right as they do, they are not to blame for desiring its full recognition, as being right; but, thinking it wrong, as we do, can we yield to them? Can we cast our votes with their view, and against our own? In view of our moral, social, and political responsibilities, can we do this?
Wrong as we think Slavery is, we can yet afford to let it alone where it is, because that much is due to the necessity arising from its actual presence in the nation; but can we, while our votes will prevent it, allow it to spread into the National Territories, and to overrun us here in these Free States?
If our sense of duty forbids this, then let us stand by our duty, fearlessly and effectively. Let us be diverted by none of those sophistical contrivances wherewith we are so industriously plied and belabored — contrivances such as groping for middle ground between the right and the wrong, vain as the search for a man who should be neither a living man nor a dead man — such as a policy of "don't care" on a question about which all true men do care — such as Union appeals beseeching true Union men to yield to Disunionists, reversing the divine rule, and calling, not the sinners, but the righteous to repentance — such as invocations of Washington, imploring men to unsay what Washington did.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Abraham Lincoln Foto
Abraham Lincoln44
US-amerikanischer Präsident 1809 - 1865

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J. Howard Moore Foto
Aristotle Foto
John F. Kennedy Foto

„We must know all the facts and hear all the alternatives and listen to all the criticisms. Let us welcome controversial books and controversial authors. For the Bill of Rights is the guardian of our security as well as our liberty.“

—  John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States of America 1917 - 1963

Saturday Review (29 October 1960), p. 44
1960
Kontext: If this nation is to be wise as well as strong, if we are to achieve our destiny, then we need more new ideas for more wise men reading more good books in more public libraries. These libraries should be open to all — except the censor. We must know all the facts and hear all the alternatives and listen to all the criticisms. Let us welcome controversial books and controversial authors. For the Bill of Rights is the guardian of our security as well as our liberty.

Joan Didion Foto
Dejan Stojanovic Foto

„Accidents are not accidents but precise arrivals at the wrong right time.“

—  Dejan Stojanovic poet, writer, and businessman 1959

Being Late http://www.poetrysoup.com/famous/poem/21366/Being_Late
From the poems written in English

John Maynard Keynes Foto

„It is better to be roughly right than precisely wrong.“

—  John Maynard Keynes British economist 1883 - 1946

Not attributed to Keynes until after his death. The original quote comes from Carveth Read and is:
It is better to be vaguely right than exactly wrong.
Logic, deductive and inductive (1898), p. 351 http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18440/18440-h/18440-h.htm#Page_351
Misattributed

Colin Blackburn, Baron Blackburn Foto
Jerome K. Jerome Foto

„Remember happiness doesn't depend upon who you are or what you have; it depends solely on what you think.“

—  Dale Carnegie American writer and lecturer 1888 - 1955

As quoted in Plenty of Time to Sleep When You're Dead : A Compilation of Life-changing Quotes (2006) by Richard Caridi
As quoted in Sprituality in a Materialistic World (2008) by Leslie Klein
Variante: Remember happiness doesn't depend on who you are or what you have; it depends solely upon what you think.

Martha Graham Foto
Thomas Jefferson Foto

„Our civil rights have no dependence upon our religious opinions more than our opinions in physics or geometry.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826

A Bill for Establishing Religious Freedom, Chapter 82 (1779). Published in The Works of Thomas Jefferson in Twelve Volumes http://oll.libertyfund.org/ToC/0054.php, Federal Edition, Paul Leicester Ford, ed., New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1904, Vol. 1 http://oll.libertyfund.org/Texts/Jefferson0136/Works/0054-01_Bk.pdf, pp. 438–441. Comparison of Jefferson's proposed draft and the bill enacted http://web.archive.org/web/19990128135214/http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7842/bill-act.htm
1770s
Variante: Our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions any more than our opinions in physics or geometry...
Quelle: The Statute Of Virginia For Religious Freedom
Kontext: Well aware that the opinions and belief of men depend not on their own will, but follow involuntarily the evidence proposed to their minds; that Almighty God hath created the mind free, and manifested his supreme will that free it shall remain by making it altogether insusceptible of restraint; that all attempts to influence it by temporal punishments, or burthens, or by civil incapacitations, tend only to beget habits of hypocrisy and meanness, and are a departure from the plan of the holy author of our religion, who being lord both of body and mind, yet choose not to propagate it by coercions on either, as was in his Almighty power to do, but to exalt it by its influence on reason alone; that the impious presumption of legislature and ruler, civil as well as ecclesiastical, who, being themselves but fallible and uninspired men, have assumed dominion over the faith of others, setting up their own opinions and modes of thinking as the only true and infallible, and as such endeavoring to impose them on others, hath established and maintained false religions over the greatest part of the world and through all time: That to compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical; … that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions, any more than our opinions in physics or geometry; and therefore the proscribing any citizen as unworthy the public confidence by laying upon him an incapacity of being called to offices of trust or emolument, unless he profess or renounce this or that religions opinion, is depriving him injudiciously of those privileges and advantages to which, in common with his fellow-citizens, he has a natural right; that it tends also to corrupt the principles of that very religion it is meant to encourage, by bribing with a monopoly of worldly honours and emolumerits, those who will externally profess and conform to it; that though indeed these are criminals who do not withstand such temptation, yet neither are those innocent who lay the bait in their way; that the opinions of men are not the object of civil government, nor under its jurisdiction; that to suffer the civil magistrate to intrude his powers into the field of opinion and to restrain the profession or propagation of principles on supposition of their ill tendency is a dangerous fallacy, which at once destroys all religious liberty, … and finally, that truth is great and will prevail if left to herself; that she is the proper and sufficient antagonist to error, and has nothing to fear from the conflict unless by human interposition disarmed of her natural weapons, free argument and debate; errors ceasing to be dangerous when it is permitted freely to contradict them.

George Howard Earle, Jr. Foto
Aldous Huxley Foto
Tim O'Reilly Foto
Frederick William Robertson Foto
William Lloyd Garrison Foto

„Is Error, though unwittingly supported by a host of good men, stronger than Truth? Are Right and Wrong convertible terms, dependant upon popular opinion?“

—  William Lloyd Garrison American journalist 1805 - 1879

Introductory Remarks
Thoughts on African Colonization (1832)
Kontext: Is Error, though unwittingly supported by a host of good men, stronger than Truth? Are Right and Wrong convertible terms, dependant upon popular opinion? Oh no! Then I will go forward in the strength of the Lord of Hosts — in the name of Truth — and under the banner of Right. As it is not by might nor by power, but by the Spirit of God, that great moral changes are effected, I am encouraged to fight valiantly in this good cause, believing that I shall "come off conqueror, and more than conqueror" — yet not I, but Truth and Justice. It is in such a contest that one shall chase a thousand, and two put ten thousand to flight.

Joel Osteen Foto

„You may think there is a lot wrong with you, but there is also a lot right with you.“

—  Joel Osteen American televangelist and author 1963

Quelle: Your Best Life Now: 7 Steps to Living at Your Full Potential

Thomas Paine Foto

„Far better an approximate answer to the right question, which is often vague, than an exact answer to the wrong question, which can always be made precise.“

—  John Tukey American mathematician 1915 - 2000

The future of data analysis. Annals of Mathematical Statistics 33 (1), (1962), page 13.
Variante: "An approximate answer to the right question is worth a great deal more than a precise answer to the wrong question." "as the renowned statistician John Tukey once reportedly said," according to Super Freakonomics page 224.

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