„No society can possibly be built upon a denial of individual freedom. It is contrary to the very nature of man. Just as a man will not grow horns or a tail, so will he not exist as man if he has no mind of his own. In reality even those who do not believe in the liberty of the individual believe in their own.“

Conquest of Violence: The Gandhian Philosophy of Conflict by Joan V. Bondurant (1965) University of California Press, Berkeley: CA, p. 174. Harijan (1 February 1942) p. 27
1940s

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
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Mahátma Gándhí13
indischer Politiker 1869 - 1948

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„When a man tries to own an individual, whether that individual be another man, an animal or even a tree, he suffers the psychic consequences of an unnatural act.“

—  Tom Robbins, buch Another Roadside Attraction

Another Roadside Attraction (1971)
Kontext: When a man confines an animal in a cage, he assumes ownership of that animal. But an animal is an individual; it cannot be owned. When a man tries to own an individual, whether that individual be another man, an animal or even a tree, he suffers the psychic consequences of an unnatural act.

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„I believe each individual is naturally entitled to do as he pleases with himself and the fruit of his labor, so far as it in no wise interferes with any other man's rights“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

1850s, Speech at Chicago (1858)
Kontext: I believe each individual is naturally entitled to do as he pleases with himself and the fruit of his labor, so far as it in no wise interferes with any other man's rights, that each community, as a State, has a right to do exactly as it pleases with all the concerns within that State that interfere with the right of no other State, and that the general government, upon principle, has no right to interfere with anything other than that general class of things that does concern the whole.

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„Freedom is for honest people. No man who is not himself honest can be free — he is in his own trap.“

—  L. Ron Hubbard American science fiction author, philosopher, cult leader, and the founder of the Church of Scientology 1911 - 1986

"Honest People Have Rights, Too" (8 February 1960).
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„Nobody can be so amusingly arrogant as a young man who has just discovered an old idea and thinks it is his own.“

—  Sydney J. Harris American journalist 1917 - 1986

"Purely Personal Prejudices" http://books.google.com/books?id=DLcEAQAAIAAJ&q=%22Nobody+can+be+so+amusingly+arrogant+as+a+young+man+who+has+just+discovered+an+old+idea+and+thinks+it+is+his+own%22&pg=PA227#v=onepage
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„We do not say that a man who takes no interest in politics is a man who minds his own business; we say that he has no business here at all.“

—  Pericles Greek statesman, orator, and general of Athens -494 - -429 v.Chr

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„Of a rich man who was niggardly he said, "That man does not own his estate, but his estate owns him."“

—  Diogenes Laërtius biographer of ancient Greek philosophers 180 - 240

Bion, 3.
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—  Jean de La Bruyère, buch Les Caractères

Ménippe est l'oiseau paré de divers plumages qui ne sont pas à lui. Il ne parle pas, il ne sent pas; il répète des sentiments et des discours, se sert même si naturellement de l'esprit des autres qu'il y est le premier trompé, et qu'il croit souvent dire son goût ou expliquer sa pensée, lorsqu'il n'est que l'écho de quelqu'un qu'il vient de quitter.
Aphorism 40
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