„What we know is not much. What we do not know is immense.“

—  Pierre Simon Marquis de Laplace, Allegedly his last words, reported in Joseph Fourier's "Éloge historique de M. le Marquis de Laplace" (1829) with the comment, "This was at least the meaning of his last words, which were articulated with difficulty." Quoted in Augustus De Morgan's Budget of Paradoxes (1866).
Original

Ce que nous connaissons est peu de chose, ce que nous ignorons est immense.

Pierre Simon Marquis de Laplace Foto
Pierre Simon Marquis de Laplace
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