„But since the Modernists (as they are commonly and rightly called) employ a very clever artifice, namely, to present their doctrines without order and systematic arrangement into one whole, scattered and disjointed one from another, so as to appear to be in doubt and uncertainty, while they are in reality firm and steadfast, it will be of advantage, Venerable Brethren, to bring their teachings together here into one group, and to point out the connexion between them, and thus to pass to an examination of the sources of the errors, and to prescribe remedies for averting the evil.“

—  Pius X.

Papal encyclical letter "Pascendi dominici gregis" ("Feeding the Lord's Flock") promulgated by Pope Pius X on 8 September 1907.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Pius X. Foto
Pius X.5
257. Papst der katholischen Kirche 1835 - 1914

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François de La Rochefoucauld Foto

„The desire to appear clever often prevents one from being so.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld, buch Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims

Le désir de paraître habile empêche souvent de le devenir.
Maxim 199.
Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims (1665–1678)

„In an economy where the only certainty is uncertainty, the one sure source of lasting competitive advantage is knowledge.“

—  Ikujiro Nonaka Japanese business theorist 1935

Ikujiro Nonaka (1991), "The Knowledge-Creating Company", Harvard Business Review 69 (6 Nov-Dec): 96–104

Frithjof Schuon Foto
Adam Roberts Foto
Bernhard Riemann Foto
Kalki Krishnamurthy Foto

„There are many evils in this country. The only remedy for every one of them is freedom for the nation.“

—  Kalki Krishnamurthy writer 1899 - 1954

"The Poison Cure", as translated by Gowri Ramnarayan in Kalki : Selected Stories (1999)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Foto

„It is as certain as it is marvelous that truth and error come from one source. Therefore one often may not injure error, because at the same time one injures truth.“

—  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe German writer, artist, and politician 1749 - 1832

Es ist so gewiß als wunderbar, daß Wahrheit und Irrthum aus Einer Quelle entstehen; deßwegen man oft dem Irrthum nicht schaden darf, weil man zugleich der Wahrheit schadet.
Maxims and Reflections (1833)

Charles Darwin Foto

„The comparison here implied between the actions of one of the higher animals and of one so low in the scale as an earth-worm, may appear far-fetched; for we thus attribute to the worm attention and some mental power, nevertheless I can see no reason to doubt the justice of the comparison.“

—  Charles Darwin, buch The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms

Quelle: The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms (1881), Chapter 1: Habits of Worms, pp. 24-25. http://darwin-online.org.uk/content/frameset?pageseq=39&itemID=F1357&viewtype=image

Abd al-Karim Qasim Foto
Franz Schubert Foto
Karl Popper Foto

„But science is one of the very few human activities — perhaps the only one — in which errors are systematically criticized and fairly often, in time, corrected.“

—  Karl Popper, buch Conjectures and Refutations

Quelle: Conjectures and Refutations: The Growth of Scientific Knowledge (1963), Ch. 1 "Science : Conjectures and Refutations"
Kontext: The history of science, like the history of all human ideas, is a history of irresponsible dreams, of obstinacy, and of error. But science is one of the very few human activities — perhaps the only one — in which errors are systematically criticized and fairly often, in time, corrected. This is why we can say that, in science, we often learn from our mistakes, and why we can speak clearly and sensibly about making progress there.

Stanley Baldwin Foto
Maimónides Foto
Jeremy Taylor Foto

„…since God has appointed one remedy for all the evils in the world and that is a contented spirit.“

—  Jeremy Taylor English clergyman 1613 - 1667

"Holy Living" (1650) ch. 2, section 6. "Of Contentedness in all Estates".

Charles Sanders Peirce Foto

„These objects are commonly called points; but to remove all notion of space relations, it may be better to name them monads.“

—  Charles Sanders Peirce American philosopher, logician, mathematician, and scientist 1839 - 1914

Quelle: Mathematical Monads (1889), p. 268
Kontext: As the mathematics are now understood, each branch — or, if you please, each problem, — is but the study of the relations of a collection of connected objects, without parts, without any distinctive characters, except their names or designating letters. These objects are commonly called points; but to remove all notion of space relations, it may be better to name them monads. The relations between these points are mere complications of two different kinds of elementary relations, which may be termed immediate connection and immediate non-connection. All the monads except as serve as intermediaries for the connections have distinctive designations.

Kailash Satyarthi Foto
Peter Medawar Foto

„But Watson had one towering advantage over all of them: in addition to being extremely clever he had something important to be clever about.“

—  Peter Medawar scientist 1915 - 1987

This is an advantage which scientists enjoy over most other people engaged in intellectual pursuits, and they enjoy it at all levels of capability. To be a first-rate scientist it is not necessary (and certainly not sufficient) to be extremely clever, anyhow in a pyrotechnic sense. One of the great social revolutions brought about by scientific research has been the democratization of learning. Anyone who combines strong common sense with an ordinary degree of imaginativeness can become a creative scientist, and a happy one besides, in so far as happiness depends upon being able to develop to the limit of one's abilities.
1960s, Lucky Jim, 1968

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