„Whither, O splendid ship, thy white sails crowding,
Leaning across the bosom of the urgent West,
That fearest nor sea rising, nor sky clouding,
Whither away, fair rover, and what thy quest?“

Bk. II, No. 2, A Passer-By http://www.bartleby.com/101/835.html, st. 1 (1879).
Shorter Poems (1879-1893)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Robert Seymour Bridges Foto
Robert Seymour Bridges
englischer Dichter 1844 - 1930

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Edmund Clarence Stedman Foto
James Macpherson Foto
Tobias Smollett Foto
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Foto
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Foto
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Foto
James Macpherson Foto
William Morris Foto
Ralph Waldo Emerson Foto

„Nor knowest thou what argument
Thy life to thy neighbor's creed has lent.
All are needed by each one;
Nothing is fair or good alone.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

Each and All
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)
Variante: Nor knowest thou what argument
Thy life to thy neighbor's creed has lent.
All are needed by each one;
Nothing is fair or good alone.

James Gates Percival Foto

„On thy fair bosom, silver lake,
The wild swan spreads his snowy sail,
And round his breast the ripples break
As down he bears before the gale.“

—  James Gates Percival American geologis, poet, and surgeon 1795 - 1856

To Seneca Lake, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

Helen Dunmore Foto
Felicia Hemans Foto

„Calm on the bosom of thy God,
Fair spirit, rest thee now!“

—  Felicia Hemans English poet 1793 - 1835

The Siege of Valencia (1823), scene ix, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

Frederick William Faber Foto

„See! he sinks
Without a word; and his ensanguined bier
Is vacant in the west, while far and near
Behold! each coward shadow eastward shrinks,
Thou dost not strive, O sun, nor dost thou cry
Amid thy cloud-built streets.“

—  Frederick William Faber British hymn writer and theologian 1814 - 1863

The Rosary and Other Poems, On the Ramparts at Angoulême; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 769-70.

Geoffrey of Monmouth Foto

„Brutus! there lies beyond the Gallic bounds
An island which the western sea surrounds,
By giants once possessed; now few remain
To bar thy entrance, or obstruct thy reign.
To reach that happy shore thy sails employ;
There fate decrees to raise a second Troy,
And found an empire in thy royal line,
Which time shall ne'er destroy, nor bounds confine.“

Brute sub occasu solis trans Gallica regna<br/>Insula in occeano est habitata gigantibus olim.<br/>Nunc deserta quidem gentibus apta tuis.<br/>Illa tibi fietque tuis locus aptus in aevum;<br/>Hec erit et natis altera Troia tuis,<br/>Hic de prole tua reges nascentur et ipsis<br/>Totius terrae subditus orbis erit.

—  Geoffrey of Monmouth, The History of the Kings of Britain

Brute sub occasu solis trans Gallica regna
Insula in occeano est habitata gigantibus olim.
Nunc deserta quidem gentibus apta tuis.
Illa tibi fietque tuis locus aptus in aevum;
Hec erit et natis altera Troia tuis,
Hic de prole tua reges nascentur et ipsis
Totius terrae subditus orbis erit.
Bk. 1, ch. 11; p. 101.
Historia Regum Britanniae (History of the Kings of Britain)

James Macpherson Foto
James Macpherson Foto
Lucy Larcom Foto

„O Mariner-soul,
Thy quest is but begun,
There are new worlds
Forever to be won.“

—  Lucy Larcom American teacher, poet, author 1824 - 1893

Last written words (17 April 1893), as quoted in Ch. 12 : Last Years.
Lucy Larcom : Life, Letters, and Diary (1895)

James Macpherson Foto
Joseph Hall Foto

„There is many a rich stone laid up in the bowels of the earth, many a fair pearl laid up in the bosom of the sea, that never was seen, nor never shall be.“

—  Joseph Hall British bishop 1574 - 1656

Contemplations, Book VI, "The Veil of Moses". Compare: "Full many a gem of purest ray serene / The dark, unfathomed caves of ocean bear", Thomas Gray, Elegy, stanza 14.

John Masefield Foto

„I must down to the sea again, to the lonely sea and the sky,
And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by,
And the wheel's kick and the wind's song and the white sail's shaking,
And a grey mist on the sea's face, and a grey dawn breaking.“

—  John Masefield English poet and writer 1878 - 1967

The first line is often misquoted as "I must go down to the seas again." and this is the wording used in the song setting by John Ireland. I disagree with this last point. The poet himself was recorded reading this and he definitely says "seas". The first line should read, 'I must down ...' not, 'I must go down ...' The original version of 1902 reads 'I must down to the seas again'. In later versions, the author inserted the word 'go'.


Source: https://poemanalysis.com/sea-fever-john-masefield-poem-analysis/
Salt-Water Ballads (1902), "Sea-Fever"

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