„England is very, very important to me, because in my family the English could do no wrong. When my father picked a mistress, it was always an English girl: if he made her pregnant, she could be shipped back to England and he would not be held responsible. It never happened, but I've made a lot of work called The English Can Do No Wrong.“

Louise Bourgeois: a web of emotions, 2010

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 14. September 2021. Geschichte
Louise Bourgeois Foto
Louise Bourgeois6
französisch-US-amerikanische Bildhauerin und Malerin 1911 - 2010

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William Brett, 1st Viscount Esher Foto
Anthony Trollope Foto

„Take away from English authors their copyrights, and you would very soon take away from England her authors.“

—  Anthony Trollope English novelist (1815-1882) 1815 - 1882

Quelle: An Autobiography (1883), Ch. 6

Leopold II of Belgium Foto

„India has never cost England one centime. it paid back What it cost. India provides a livelihood for all benjamins of English families.“

—  Leopold II of Belgium King of the Belgians 1835 - 1909

Quelle: https://klara.be/leopold-ii-aflevering-3 Leopold II, Het hele Verhaal, Johan Op De Beeck Horizon, 2020] ISBN 9789463962094 Prince Leopold II In Singapore in a letter to his father King Leopold I expressing admiration for British colonialism. note: Quotes related to the Belgian Colonial Empire

Mahatma Gandhi Foto

„Palestine belongs to the Arabs in the same sense that England belongs to the English or France to the French. It is wrong and in-human to impose the Jews on the Arabs.“

—  Mahatma Gandhi pre-eminent leader of Indian nationalism during British-ruled India 1869 - 1948

Gandhi's Collected Works, Vol 74 (1938)
1930s

William Blackstone Foto

„That the king can do no wrong, is a necessary and fundamental principle of the English constitution.“

—  William Blackstone, buch Commentaries on the Laws of England

Book III, ch. 17 http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/blackstone_bk3ch17.asp: Of Injuries Proceeding from, or Affecting, the Crown.
Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765–1769)

P. W. Botha Foto

„Because you could not translate the word apartheid into the more universal language of English, the wrong connotation was given to it.“

—  P. W. Botha South African prime minister 1916 - 2006

As cited in Dictionary of South African Quotations, Jennifer Crwys-Williams, Penguin Books 1994, p. 22

„Americans do seem to say things which make the English notice England.“

—  Dodie Smith, buch I Capture the Castle

Quelle: I Capture the Castle

Enoch Powell Foto

„The relevant fact about the history of the British Isles and above all of England is its separateness in a political sense from the history of continental Europe. The English have never belonged to it and have always known that they did not belong. The assertion contains no element of paradox. The Angevin Empire contradicts it as little as the English claim to the throne of France; neither the possession of Gascony nor the inheritance of Hanover made Edward I or George III anything but English sovereigns. When Henry VIII declared that 'this realm of England is an empire (imperium) of itself', he was making not a new claim but a very old one; but he was making it at a very significant point of time. He meant—as Edward I had meant, when he said the same over two hundred years before—that there is an imperium on the continent, but that England is another imperium outside its orbit and is endowed with the plenitude of its own sovereignty. The moment at which Henry VIII repeated this assertion was that of what is misleadingly called 'the reformation'—misleadingly, because it was, and is, essentially a political and not a religious event. The whole subsequent history of Britain and the political character of the British people have taken their colour and trace their unique quality from that moment and that assertion. It was the final decision that no authority, no law, no court outside the realm would be recognised within the realm. When Cardinal Wolsey fell, the last attempt had failed to bring or keep the English nation within the ambit of any external jurisdiction or political power: since then no law has been made for England outside England, and no taxation has been levied in England by or for an authority outside England—or not at least until the proposition that Britain should accede to the Common Market.“

—  Enoch Powell British politician 1912 - 1998

Speech to The Lions' Club, Brussels (24 January 1972), from The Common Market: Renegotiate or Come Out (Elliot Right Way Books, 1973), pp. 49-50
1970s

Hermione Gingold Foto

„My family were of good English peasant class from St. John's Wood. My father dealt in stocks and shares and my mother also had a lot of time on her hands.“

—  Hermione Gingold English actress 1897 - 1987

The World is Square [her autobiography], Pt. I. Pub. 1945 by Home & Van Thal Ltd.

Chinua Achebe Foto
Jet Li Foto

„Speaking English dialogue is not easy for me. I am too lazy to learn English or speak any foreign language, so I am very grateful to my dialogue coach for helping me a lot.“

—  Jet Li Chinese martial artist and actor 1963

As quoted in Actor Jet Li Agreed To Star In ‘Mulan’ For His Daughter https://in.news.yahoo.com/actor-jet-li-agreed-star-045050431.html in Yahoo News (September 7, 2020)

Sharron Angle Foto
Enoch Powell Foto

„For the unbroken life of the English nation over a thousand years and more is a phenomenon unique in history. ... Institutions which elsewhere are recent and artificial creations, appear in England almost as works of nature, spontaneous and unquestioned. The deepest instinct of the Englishman—how the word “instinct” keeps forcing itself in again and again!—is for continuity; he never acts more freely nor innovates more boldly than when he most is conscious of conserving or even of reacting. From this continuous life of a united people in its island home spring, as from the soil of England, all that is peculiar in the gifts and the achievements of the English nation, its laws, its literature, its freedom, its self-discipline. ... And this continuous and continuing life of England is symbolised and expressed, as by nothing else, by the English kingship. English it is, for all the leeks and thistles and shamrocks, the Stuarts and the Hanoverians, for all the titles grafted upon it here and elsewhere, “her other realms and territories”, Headships of Commonwealths, and what not. The stock that received all these grafts is English, the sap that rises through it to the extremities rises from roots in English earth, the earth of England's history.“

—  Enoch Powell British politician 1912 - 1998

Speech to the Royal Society of St George (22 April 1961), quoted in A Nation Not Afraid. The Thinking of Enoch Powell (1965), pp. 145–146

Thomas Carlyle Foto
A. P. Herbert Foto
Naomi Watts Foto

„I consider myself British and have very happy memories of the UK. I spent the first 14 years of my life in England and never wanted to leave. When I was in Australia I went back to England a lot.“

—  Naomi Watts British actress and film producer 1968

[Watts turns back on Australia, April 24 2007, http://www.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/story/0,22049,21607413-5006002,00.html, The Daily Telegraph, 2007-04-24, https://archive.is/LR0E, 2012-05-29]

Dadabhai Naoroji Foto

„He was of opinion that we should be able to convince the general English public, the working man particularly, that the reforms that I advanced would be far more beneficial to the English nation, particularly to the working man…If India is prosperous and rich, she would buy far more English produce and give work proportionately to the working man.“

—  Dadabhai Naoroji Indian politician 1825 - 1917

His noting in his dairy after his contesting election in 1886 page=10.
Narrow-majority’ and ‘Bow-and-agree’: Public Attitudes Towards the Elections of the First Asian MPs in Britain, Dadabhai Naoroji and Mancherjee Merwanjee Bhownaggree, 1885-1906

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