„But why should one be ashamed of writing badly in spite of knowing better – it’s results that shows errors“

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Frédéric Chopin Foto
Frédéric Chopin6
polnischer Komponist 1810 - 1849

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Joyce Carol Oates Foto
Victor Hugo Foto
John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton Foto

„The result would be an Encyclopedia of Error.“

—  John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton British politician and historian 1834 - 1902

Letter to Mary Gladstone (1881)
Kontext: There is no error so monstrous that it fails to find defenders among the ablest men. Imagine a congress of eminent celebrities, such as More, Bacon, Grotius, Pascal, Cromwell, Bossuet, Montesquieu, Jefferson, Napoleon, Pitt, etc. The result would be an Encyclopedia of Error.

Antisthenes Foto

„One should attend to one's enemies, for they are the first persons to detect one's errors.“

—  Antisthenes Greek philosopher -444 - -365 v.Chr

§ 5
From Lives and Opinions of the Eminent Philosophers by Diogenes Laërtius
Original: (el) προσέχειν τοῖς ἐχθροῖς· πρῶτοι γὰρ τῶν ἁμαρτημάτων αἰσθάνονται.

Samuel Butler (poet) Foto

„And force them, though it was in spite
Of Nature and their stars, to write.“

—  Samuel Butler (poet) poet and satirist 1612 - 1680

Canto I, line 647
Quelle: Hudibras, Part I (1663–1664)

Octavia E. Butler Foto
Zeno of Elea Foto

„The truth is, that these writings of mine were meant to protect the arguments of Parmenides against those who make fun of him and seek to show the many ridiculous and contradictory results which they suppose to follow from the affirmation of the one.“

—  Zeno of Elea ancient Greek philosopher, mostly known for his eponym paradoxes -490 - -425 v.Chr

As quoted in Parmenides by Plato, a portrayal of a discussion which begins between Socrates and Zeno, and then primarily Parmenides; as translated by Benjamin Jowett, Parmenides (1871)
My writing is an answer to the partisans of the many and it returns their attack with interest, with a view to showing that the hypothesis of the many, if examined sufficiently in detail, leads to even more ridiculous results than the hypothesis of the One.
As translated in A History of Philosophy, Vol. I : Greece and Rome (1953) by Frederick Charles Copleston.
Kontext: The truth is, that these writings of mine were meant to protect the arguments of Parmenides against those who make fun of him and seek to show the many ridiculous and contradictory results which they suppose to follow from the affirmation of the one. My answer is addressed to the partisans of the many, whose attack I return with interest by retorting upon them that their hypothesis of the being of many, if carried out, appears to be still more ridiculous than the hypothesis of the being of one. Zeal for my master led me to write the book in the days of my youth, but some one stole the copy; and therefore I had no choice whether it should be published or not; the motive, however, of writing, was not the ambition of an elder man, but the pugnacity of a young one.

Molière Foto

„Anyone may be an honorable man, and yet write verse badly.“

—  Molière, Der Menschenfeind

On peut être honnête homme et faire mal des vers.
Act IV, sc. i
Le Misanthrope (1666)

Carl Eckart Foto
John Locke Foto

„It is one thing to show a man that he is in error, and another to put him in possession of the truth.“

—  John Locke, buch An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding

Book IV, Ch. 7, sec. 11
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689)

Robert A. Heinlein Foto
Frances Hodgson Burnett Foto
Kurt Vonnegut Foto

„Well, I've worried some about, you know, why write books“

—  Kurt Vonnegut American writer 1922 - 2007

"A Talk with Kurt Vonnegut. Jr." by Robert Scholes in The Vonnegut Statement (1973) edited by Jerome Klinkowitz and John Somer October 1966), later published in Conversations With Kurt Vonnegut (1988), p. 123
Various interviews
Kontext: Well, I've worried some about, you know, why write books … why are we teaching people to write books when presidents and senators do not read them, and generals do not read them. And it's been the university experience that taught me that there is a very good reason, that you catch people before they become generals and presidents and so forth and you poison their minds with … humanity, and however you want to poison their minds, it's presumably to encourage them to make a better world.

John Dryden Foto

„Can heav'nly minds such high resentment show,
Or exercise their spite in human woe?“

—  John Dryden English poet and playwright of the XVIIth century 1631 - 1700

Aeneis, Book I, lines 17–18.
The Works of Virgil (1697)

Imre Kertész Foto
John Fante Foto
Caroline Dhavernas Foto

„Most reporters I've spoken with want very badly to understand what is happening to her, but the "why" is really very unimportant. That is just not the point of the show. The journey is how she will deal with this situation, and how it will change her life.“

—  Caroline Dhavernas Canadian actress 1978

About her character on Wonderfalls, in "'Wonderfalls' Spills Torrent of Wit" by John Crooks at Zap2it.com (2004) http://entertainment.msn.com/news/article.aspx?news=151951&wa=wsignin1.0

Peter Ladefoged Foto

„I wanted to find out why Shelley could write better-sounding poetry than I.“

—  Peter Ladefoged British phonetician 1925 - 2006

Los Angeles Times (1970); on why he chose to pursue phonetics.

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