„Science is a most useful thing for us all. It is one of the most useful ornaments of man. There is no dress which embellishes the body more than science does the mind.“

Statement of 1864, quoted in Pamphlets on the Deaf, Dumb & Blind http://books.google.com/books?id=FLcMAQAAIAAJ&q=%22There+is+no+dress+which+embellishes+the+body+more+than+science+does+the+mind%22&dq=%22There+is+no+dress+which+embellishes+the+body+more+than+science+does+the+mind%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=UlFgVOWoJY-uyATH1YDACQ&ved=0CB8Q6AEwAA

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Laurent Clerc Foto
Laurent Clerc
französischer Gehörlosenpädagoge 1785 - 1869

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Edward Teller Foto

„Secrecy in science does not work. Withholding information does more damage to us than to our competitors.“

—  Edward Teller Hungarian-American nuclear physicist 1908 - 2003

As quoted in Proceedings of the International Conference on Lasers '87 (1988) edited by F. J. Duarte, p. 1165

Harriet Beecher Stowe Foto
Robert G. Ingersoll Foto

„The most important thing in this world is liberty. More important than food or clothes — more important than gold or houses or lands — more important than art or science — more important than all religions, is the liberty of man.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899

The trial of Charles B. Reynolds for blasphemy (1887)
Kontext: I want you to understand what has been done in the world to force men to think alike. It seems to me that if there is some infinite being who wants us to think alike he would have made us alike. Why did he not do so? Why did he make your brain so that you could not by any possibility be a Methodist? Why did he make yours so that you could not be a Catholic? And why did he make the brain of another so that he is an unbeliever — why the brain of another so that he became a Mohammedan — if he wanted us all to believe alike?
After all, maybe Nature is good enough and grand enough and broad enough to give us the diversity born of liberty. Maybe, after all, it would not be best for us all to be just the same. What a stupid world, if everybody said yes to everything that everybody else might say.
The most important thing in this world is liberty. More important than food or clothes — more important than gold or houses or lands — more important than art or science — more important than all religions, is the liberty of man.

Simone Weil Foto

„A science which does not bring us nearer to God is worthless.“

—  Simone Weil French philosopher, Christian mystic, and social activist 1909 - 1943

Thomas Carlyle Foto
William of Ockham Foto

„Logic is the most useful tool of all the arts. Without it no science can be fully known.“

—  William of Ockham, buch Sum of Logic

Summa Logicae (c. 1323), Prefatory Letter, as translated by Paul Vincent Spade (1995) http://www.pvspade.com/Logic/docs/ockham.pdf
Kontext: Logic is the most useful tool of all the arts. Without it no science can be fully known. It is not worn out by repeated use, after the manner of material tools, but rather admits of continual growth through the diligent exercise of any other science. For just as a mechanic who lacks a complete knowledge of his tool gains a fuller [knowledge] by using it, so one who is educated in the firm principles of logic, while he painstakingly devotes his labor to the other sciences, acquires at the same time a greater skill at this art.

Carl Sagan Foto

„Science is much more than a body of knowledge. It is a way of thinking. This is central to its success. Science invites us to let the facts in, even when they don’t conform to our preconceptions.“

—  Carl Sagan American astrophysicist, cosmologist, author and science educator 1934 - 1996

"Why We Need To Understand Science" in The Skeptical Inquirer Vol. 14, Issue 3 (Spring 1990)
Kontext: Science is much more than a body of knowledge. It is a way of thinking. This is central to its success. Science invites us to let the facts in, even when they don’t conform to our preconceptions. It counsels us to carry alternative hypotheses in our heads and see which ones best match the facts. It urges on us a fine balance between no-holds-barred openness to new ideas, however heretical, and the most rigorous skeptical scrutiny of everything — new ideas and established wisdom. We need wide appreciation of this kind of thinking. It works. It’s an essential tool for a democracy in an age of change. Our task is not just to train more scientists but also to deepen public understanding of science.

Aldous Huxley Foto
Duns Scotus Foto

„If all men by nature desire to know, then they desire most of all the greatest knowledge of science. So the Philosopher argues in chap. 2 of his first book of the work [Metaphisics]. And he immediately indicates what the greatest science is, namely the science which is about those things that are most knowable. But there are two senses in which things are said to be maximally knowable: either [1] because they are the first of all things known and without them nothing else can be known; or [2] because they are what are known most certainly. In either way, however, this science is about the most knowable. Therefore, this most of all is a science and, consequently, most desirable…“

—  Duns Scotus Scottish Franciscan friar, philosopher and Catholic blessed 1265 - 1308

sic: si omnes homines natura scire desiderant, ergo maxime scientiam maxime desiderabunt. Ita arguit Philosophus I huius cap. 2. Et ibidem subdit: "quae sit maxime scientia, illa scilicet quae est circa maxime scibilia".
Maxime autem dicuntur scibilia dupliciter: uel quia primo omnium sciuntur sine quibus non possunt alia sciri; uel quia sunt certissima cognoscibilia. Utroque autem modo considerat ista scientia maxime scibilia. Haec igitur est maxime scientia, et per consequens maxime desiderabilis.
Quaestiones subtilissimae de metaphysicam Aristotelis, as translated in: William A. Frank, Allan Bernard Wolter (1995) Duns Scotus, metaphysician. p. 18-19
Original: (la) sic: si omnes homines natura scire desiderant, ergo maxime scientiam maxime desiderabunt. Ita arguit Philosophus I huius cap. 2. Et ibidem subdit: "quae sit maxime scientia, illa scilicet quae est circa maxime scibilia". Maxime autem dicuntur scibilia dupliciter: uel quia primo omnium sciuntur sine quibus non possunt alia sciri; uel quia sunt certissima cognoscibilia. Utroque autem modo considerat ista scientia maxime scibilia. Haec igitur est maxime scientia, et per consequens maxime desiderabilis.

Hal Abelson Foto

„Anything which uses science as part of its name isn't: political science, creation science, computer science.“

—  Hal Abelson computer scientist 1947

Quelle: The Nature of Belief http://www.xent.com/FoRK-archive/sept97/0213.html

John Glenn Foto

„The most important thing we can do is inspire young minds and to advance the kind of science, math and technology education that will help youngsters take us to the next phase of space travel.“

—  John Glenn American astronaut and politician 1921 - 2016

As quoted in "Space All systems go for National Space Day" at CNN (4 May 2000) http://articles.cnn.com/2000-05-03/tech/space.day_1_challenger-center-space-science-education-international-space-station-the?_s=PM:TECH; also at John Glenn Friendship 7 Day http://www.bandmonline.com/john-glenn-friendship-7-day-1.2673727#.TzyskbSt3LQ.

John Locke Foto
Philip K. Dick Foto
Kurt Vonnegut Foto

„I used to think that science would save us, and science certainly tried. But we can't stand any more tremendous explosions, either for or against democracy.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut American writer 1922 - 2007

Bennington College address (1970)
Kontext: We would be a lot safer if the Government would take its money out of science and put it into astrology and the reading of palms. I used to think that science would save us, and science certainly tried. But we can't stand any more tremendous explosions, either for or against democracy.

Bertrand Russell Foto

„We need a science to save us from science.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

NY Times Magazine, as reported in High Points in the Work of the High Schools of New York City, Vol. 34 (1952), p. 46
1950s

John Gray Foto

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