„Roger: Um, I would add probably a little bit of salt, and I like anything that has ginger in it, so I would put a little ginger into Warped Tour and it would be PERFECT“

—  Roger Lima
Roger Lima Foto
Roger Lima
brasilianischer Musiker 1973

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Sophie Kinsella Foto
Kent Hovind Foto

„If I were king or president… of a section of, say, America, I would want to pattern everything based on God's word, because God's law is perfect.“

—  Kent Hovind American young Earth creationist 1953
-Edited Version- Pastor Steve Anderson interviews Dr Kent Hovind (Re-upload) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4y4J7o62-w8, Youtube (January 22, 2015)

Silvio Berlusconi Foto

„I know in Italy there is a producer, producing a film on Nazi concentration camps. I will suggest you for the role of kapo. You would be perfect for that role.“

—  Silvio Berlusconi Italian politician 1936
2003, Statement to German MEP Martin Schulz, European Parliament (2 July 2003), as quoted in "In quotes: Berlusconi in his own words" at BBC News (2 May 2006) http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3041288.stm, "Did I say This? in The Observer (20 April 2008) http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2008/apr/20/italy, and in Italian at "Silvio Berlusconi vs MEP Martin Schulz; relive the moment" at YouTube (16 April 2008) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bPqaqGJ5Js

Ann Brashares Foto
Pythagoras Foto

„Truth is so great a perfection, that if God would render himself visible to men, he would choose light for his body and truth for his soul.“

—  Pythagoras ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher -585 - -495 v.Chr
As quoted in A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors of the World, both Ancient and Modern (1908) by Tyron Edwards, p. 592

Ray Comfort Foto
Baruch Spinoza Foto

„When you say that if I deny, that the operations of seeing, hearing, attending, wishing, &c., can be ascribed to God, or that they exist in him in any eminent fashion, you do not know what sort of God mine is ; I suspect that you believe there is no greater perfection than such as can be explained by the aforesaid attributes. I am not astonished ; for I believe that, if a triangle could speak, it would say, in like manner, that God is eminently triangular, while a circle would say that the divine nature is eminently circular. Thus each would ascribe to God its own attributes, would assume itself to be like God, and look on everything else as ill-shaped.“

—  Baruch Spinoza Dutch philosopher 1632 - 1677
Context: When you say that if I deny, that the operations of seeing, hearing, attending, wishing, &c., can be ascribed to God, or that they exist in him in any eminent fashion, you do not know what sort of God mine is; I suspect that you believe there is no greater perfection than such as can be explained by the aforesaid attributes. I am not astonished; for I believe that, if a triangle could speak, it would say, in like manner, that God is eminently triangular, while a circle would say that the divine nature is eminently circular. Thus each would ascribe to God its own attributes, would assume itself to be like God, and look on everything else as ill-shaped. The briefness of a letter and want of time do not allow me to enter into my opinion on the divine nature, or the questions you have propounded. Besides, suggesting difficulties is not the same as producing reasons. That we do many things in the world from conjecture is true, but that our redactions are based on conjecture is false. In practical life we are compelled to follow what is most probable; in speculative thought we are compelled to follow truth. A man would perish of hunger and thirst, if he refused to eat or drink, till he had obtained positive proof that food and drink would be good for him. But in philosophic reflection this is not so. On the contrary, we must take care not to admit as true anything, which is only probable. For when one falsity has been let in, infinite others follow. Again, we cannot infer that because sciences of things divine and human are full of controversies and quarrels, therefore their whole subject-matter is uncertain; for there have been many persons so enamoured of contradiction, as to turn into ridicule geometrical axioms. Letter 56 (60), to Hugo Boxel (1674) http://oll.libertyfund.org/?option=com_staticxt&staticfile=show.php%3Ftitle=1711&chapter=144218&layout=html&Itemid=27

George Boole Foto

„Probability is expectation founded upon partial knowledge. A perfect acquaintance with all the circumstances affecting the occurrence of an event would change expectation into certainty, and leave neither room nor demand for a theory of probabilities.“

—  George Boole English mathematician, philosopher and logician 1815 - 1864
1850s, An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854), p. 244; Cited in: Michael J. Katz (1986) Templets and the Explanation of Complex Patterns, p. 123

Neal Shusterman Foto
Richard Rodríguez Foto
Dejan Stojanovic Foto

„To accomplish the perfect perfection, a little imperfection helps.“

—  Dejan Stojanovic poet, writer, and businessman 1959
From the poems written in English, Imperfection http://www.poetrysoup.com/famous/poem/21399/Imperfection

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Foto

„In anything at all, perfection is finally attained not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away, when a body has been stripped down to its nakedness.“

—  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry French writer and aviator 1900 - 1944
Terre des Hommes (1939), Context: Have you looked at a modern airplane? Have you followed from year to year the evolution of its lines? Have you ever thought, not only about the airplane but about whatever man builds, that all of man's industrial efforts, all his computations and calculations, all the nights spent over working draughts and blueprints, invariably culminate in the production of a thing whose sole and guiding principle is the ultimate principle of simplicity? It is as if there were a natural law which ordained that to achieve this end, to refine the curve of a piece of furniture, or a ship's keel, or the fuselage of an airplane, until gradually it partakes of the elementary purity of the curve of a human breast or shoulder, there must be the experimentation of several generations of craftsmen. In anything at all, perfection is finally attained not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away, when a body has been stripped down to its nakedness. Ch III : The Tool Variant translation of: <span id="perfection"></span>Il semble que la perfection soit atteinte non quand il n'y a plus rien à ajouter, mais quand il n'y a plus rien à retrancher. Ch. III: L'Avion <!-- p. 60 --> It seems that perfection is attained not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing more to remove.

John Updike Foto
Frédéric Chopin Foto
Cate Blanchett Foto
Charles Baudelaire Foto

„I can scarcely conceive (would my brain be a spellbound mirror?) a type of beauty without unhappiness. Supported by — others would say, obsessed by — these notions, one may conceive it would be difficult for me not to conclude that the most perfect type of masculine beauty is Satan, — as rendered by Milton.“

—  Charles Baudelaire French poet 1821 - 1867
Journaux intimes (1864–1867; published 1887), Fusées (1867), Je ne conçois guère (mon cerveau serait-il un miroir ensorcelé?) un type de Beauté où il n'y ait du Malheur. Appuyé sur — d'autres diraient: obsédé par — ces idées, on conçoit qu'il me serait difficile de en pas conclure que le plus parfait type de Beauté virile est Satan, — à la manière de Milton. XVI http://fr.wikisource.org/wiki/Fus%C3%A9es#XVI

Noam Chomsky Foto
Janusz Korwin-Mikke Foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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