„Udnie – I see Again in Memory my Dear Udnie' is no more the portrait of a young girl than 'Edtaonisl' (counterpart of his work 'Udnie'] is the image of a prelate, as we ordinarily conceive of them. They are [both] memories of America, evocations of over there which, subtly set down like musical chords, become representative of an idea, a nostalgia, a fleeting impression.“

'Udnie – I see Again in Memory my Dear Udnie' is the title of a painting, he made in 1913; a memory of the dances performed by Stasia Napierkowska on the ship to New York, to visit the w:Armory Show, where Picabia was presented in 1913 as a 'leading Cubist painter'
1910's
Quelle: 'Ecrits: vol. 1', 1913 - 1920, Picabia, Belfond, Paris, p. 26

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Francis Picabia Foto
Francis Picabia6
kubanischer Schriftsteller, Maler, Grafiker 1879 - 1953

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Napoleon I of France Foto

„Ordinarily men exercise their memory much more than their judgment.“

—  Napoleon I of France French general, First Consul and later Emperor of the French 1769 - 1821

Napoleon : In His Own Words (1916)

Jean Dubuffet Foto

„Portrait likenesses cooked and preserved in memory, likenesses burst in the memory of Mr. Jean Dubuffet, painter.“

—  Jean Dubuffet sculptor from France 1901 - 1985

Two quotes, Jean Dubuffet placed on the poster announcing his painting-show 'Les gens sont plus beaux qu'ils croient, in Galerie René Drouin, Paris (October 7–31, 1947)
1940's

Alberto Manguel Foto
Jacob Bronowski Foto
Jackie Kay Foto

„…I like the idea that stories are active, that if you stepped on them they would become alive, like plants, and that the same memory can grow new shoots and flowers, and can change over the course of people’s lives…“

—  Jackie Kay Poet and novelist 1961

On the living nature of stories in “The SRB Interview: Jackie Kay” https://www.scottishreviewofbooks.org/2016/03/the-srb-interview-jackie-kay/ in the Scottish Review of Books (2016 Mar 21)

David Levithan Foto
Steven Pinker Foto
Thomas Anthony Dooley III Foto

„I must remember the things I have seen. I must keep them fresh in memory, see them again in my mind's eye, live through them again and again in my thoughts. And most of all, I must make good use of them in tomorrow's life.“

—  Thomas Anthony Dooley III American physician 1927 - 1961

Deliver Us From Evil (1956); recounting Dooley's life-changing experience in 1954, while in the Navy and stationed in Vietnam evacuating anti-Communist refugees, observing the misery of the people.

Thomas Beecham Foto

„Great music is that which penetrates the ear with facility and leaves the memory with difficulty. Magical music never leaves the memory.“

—  Thomas Beecham British conductor and impresario 1879 - 1961

[Beecham admitted to Neville Cardus that he had made this up on the spur of the moment to satisfy an importunate journalist; he acknowledged that it was an oversimplification. (Neville Cardus: 'Sir Thomas Beecham, A Memoir', 1961)]

Abraham Lincoln Foto

„My childhood's home I see again,
And sadden with the view;
And still, as memory crowds my brain,
There's pleasure in it too.“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

Canto I
Quelle: 1840s, My Childhood's Home I See Again (1844 - 1846)

Mario Vargas Llosa Foto
Utah Phillips Foto

„As I have said so often before, the long memory is the most radical idea in America….“

—  Utah Phillips American labor organizer, folk singer, storyteller and poet 1935 - 2008

on a CD called The Long Memory (1996)

Andy García Foto
Walter Raleigh (professor) Foto

„Over and against the plays of Shakespeare and his fellows, as their natural counterpart, must be set the Voyages of Hakluyt; he who would understand the Elizabethan age, and what it meant for England, must know them both.“

—  Walter Raleigh (professor) British academic 1861 - 1922

p. 151 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=yale.39002032470974;view=1up;seq=167
English Voyages of the Sixteenth Century (1906)

Christopher Isherwood Foto

„The images which remained in the memory are not in themselves terrible or rigorous“

—  Christopher Isherwood English novelist 1904 - 1986

As quoted in Isherwood : A Life (2004) by Peter Parker, pp. 40-41; this reminiscence is from the first draft of the biographical study Isherwood did of his parents (Huntington CI 1082: 81). The version published in Kathleen and Frank (1971), chapter 15, p. 285 differs slightly.
Kontext: The images which remained in the memory are not in themselves terrible or rigorous: they are of boot-lockers, wooden desks, lists on boards, name-tags in clothes — yes, the name pre-eminently; the name which in a sense makes you nameless, less individual rather than more so: Bradshaw-Isherwood, C. W. in its place on some alphabetical list; the cold daily, hourly reminder that you are not the unique, the loved, the household’s darling, but just one among many. I suppose that this loss of identity is really much of the painfulness which lies at the bottom of what is called Homesickness; it is not Home that one cries for but one’s home-self.

David Hume Foto

„Nay farther, even with relation to that succession, we cou'd only admit of those perceptions, which are immediately present to our consciousness, nor cou'd those lively images, with which the memory presents us, be ever receiv'd as true pictures of past perceptions. The memory, senses, and understanding are, therefore, all of them founded on the imagination, or the vivacity of our ideas.“

—  David Hume, buch A Treatise of Human Nature

Part 4, Section 7
A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40), Book 1: Of the understanding
Kontext: I am first affrighted and confounded with that forelorn solitude, in which I am plac'd in my philosophy, and fancy myself some strange uncouth monster, who not being able to mingle and unite in society, has been expell'd all human commerce, and left utterly abandon'd and disconsolate. Fain wou'd I run into the crowd for shelter and warmth; but cannot prevail with myself to mix with such deformity. I call upon others to join me, in order to make a company apart; but no one will hearken to me. Every one keeps at a distance, and dreads that storm, which beats upon me from every side. I have expos'd myself to the enmity of all metaphysicians, logicians, mathematicians, and even theologians; and can I wonder at the insults I must suffer? I have declar'd my disapprobation of their systems; and can I be surpriz'd, if they shou'd express a hatred of mine and of my person? When I look abroad, I foresee on every side, dispute, contradiction, anger, calumny and detraction. When I turn my eye inward, I find nothing but doubt and ignorance. All the world conspires to oppose and contradict me; tho' such is my weakness, that I feel all my opinions loosen and fall of themselves, when unsupported by the approbation of others. Every step I take is with hesitation, and every new reflection makes me dread an error and absurdity in my reasoning.
For with what confidence can I venture upon such bold enterprises, when beside those numberless infirmities peculiar to myself, I find so many which are common to human nature? Can I be sure, that in leaving all established opinions I am following truth; and by what criterion shall I distinguish her, even if fortune shou'd at last guide me on her foot-steps? After the most accurate and exact of my reasonings, I can give no reason why I shou'd assent to it; and feel nothing but a strong propensity to consider objects strongly in that view, under which they appear to me. Experience is a principle, which instructs me in the several conjunctions of objects for the past. Habit is another principle, which determines me to expect the same for the future; and both of them conspiring to operate upon the imagination, make me form certain ideas in a more intense and lively manner, than others, which are not attended with the same advantages. Without this quality, by which the mind enlivens some ideas beyond others (which seemingly is so trivial, and so little founded on reason) we cou'd never assent to any argument, nor carry our view beyond those few objects, which are present to our senses. Nay, even to these objects we cou'd never attribute any existence, but what was dependent on the senses; and must comprehend them entirely in that succession of perceptions, which constitutes our self or person. Nay farther, even with relation to that succession, we cou'd only admit of those perceptions, which are immediately present to our consciousness, nor cou'd those lively images, with which the memory presents us, be ever receiv'd as true pictures of past perceptions. The memory, senses, and understanding are, therefore, all of them founded on the imagination, or the vivacity of our ideas.

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