„To spread healthy ideas among even the lowest classes of people, to remove men from the influence of prejudice and passion, to make reason the arbiter and supreme guide of public opinion; that is the essential goal of the sciences; that is how science will contribute to the advancement of civilization, and that is what deserves protection of governments who want to insure the stability of their power.“

Rapport historique sur les progrès des sciences naturelles http://books.google.com/books?id=ajsyAQAAMAAJ (1810) as quoted in Clifford D. Conner, A People's History of Science (2005)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Georges Cuvier Foto
Georges Cuvier1
französischer Naturforscher, Begründer der wissenschaftlich… 1769 - 1832

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Milton Friedman Foto
Barry Eichengreen Foto
Ali Al-Wardi Foto
John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton Foto
Léon Foucault Foto

„To contribute usefully to the advance of science, one must sometimes not disdain from undertaking simple verifications.“

—  Léon Foucault French physicist 1819 - 1868

As quoted in The Life and Science of Léon Foucault : The Man Who Proved the Earth Rotates (2003) by William Tobin, p. 72, ISBN 0521808553

George F. Kennan Foto

„There are certain sad appreciations we have to come to about human nature on the basis of these recent wars. One of them is that suffering does not always make men better. Another is that people are not always more reasonable than governments; that public opinion, or what passes for public opinion, is not invariably a moderating force in the jungle of politics.“

—  George F. Kennan American advisor, diplomat, political scientist and historian 1904 - 2005

American Diplomacy (1951), World War I
Kontext: There are certain sad appreciations we have to come to about human nature on the basis of these recent wars. One of them is that suffering does not always make men better. Another is that people are not always more reasonable than governments; that public opinion, or what passes for public opinion, is not invariably a moderating force in the jungle of politics. It may be true, and I suspect it is, that the mass of people everywhere are normally peace-loving and would accept many restraints and sacrifices in preference to the monstrous calamities of war. But I also suspect that what purports to be public opinion in most countries that consider themselves to have popular government is often not really the consensus of the feelings of the mass of the people at all, but rather the expression of the interests of special highly vocal minorities — politicians, commentators, and publicity-seekers of all sorts: people who live by their ability to draw attention to themselves and die, like fish out of water, if they are compelled to remain silent. These people take refuge in the pat and chauvinistic slogans because they are incapable of understanding any others, because these slogans are safer from the standpoint of short-term gain, because the truth is sometimes a poor competitor in the market place of ideas — complicated, unsatisfying, full of dilemma, always vulnerable to misinterpretation and abuse. The counsels of impatience and hatred can always be supported by the crudest and cheapest symbols; for the counsels of moderation, the reasons are often intricate, rather than emotional, and difficult to explain. And so the chauvinists of all times and places go their appointed way: plucking the easy fruits, reaping the little triumphs of the day at the expense of someone else tomorrow, deluging in noise and filth anyone who gets in their way, dancing their reckless dance on the prospects for human progress, drawing the shadow of a great doubt over the validity of democratic institutions. And until people learn to spot the fanning of mass emotions and the sowing of bitterness, suspicion, and intolerance as crimes in themselves — as perhaps the greatest disservice that can be done to the cause of popular government — this sort of thing will continue to occur.

John F. Kennedy Foto

„The men who create power make an indispensable contribution to the Nation's greatness, but the men who question power make a contribution just as indispensable“

—  John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States of America 1917 - 1963

1963, Speech at Amherst College
Kontext: The men who create power make an indispensable contribution to the Nation's greatness, but the men who question power make a contribution just as indispensable, especially when that questioning is disinterested, for they determine whether we use power or power uses us.

Lal Bahadur Shastri Foto

„Those who govern must see how the people react to administration. Ultimately, the people are the final arbiters.“

—  Lal Bahadur Shastri The second Prime Minister of the Republic of India and a leader of the Indian National Congress party 1904 - 1966

About Governance

Charles A. Beard Foto
John Wesley Foto

„Passion and prejudice govern the world; only under the name of reason.“

—  John Wesley Christian theologian 1703 - 1791

Letter to John Benson (5 October 1770); published in Wesley's Select Letters (1837), p. 207
General sources
Kontext: Passion and prejudice govern the world; only under the name of reason. It is our part, by religion and reason joined, to counteract them all we can.

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel Foto

„Poetry for the People rests upon a belief that the art of telling the truth is a necessary and a healthy way to create powerful, and positive, connections among people who, otherwise, remain (unknown and unaware) strangers. The goal is not to kill connections but, rather, to create and to deepen them among truly different men and women.“

—  June Jordan Poet, essayist, playwright, feminist and bisexual activist 1936 - 2002

General rules for the "Poetry for the People" program she founded at the University of Berkeley in 1991, as quoted in June Jordan : Her Life and Letters (2006) by Valerie Kinloch, Ch. 6 : Affirmative Acts: Political Essays, p. 123
Kontext: 1. “The People” shall not be defined as a group excluding or derogating anyone on the basis of race, ethnicity, language, sexual preference, class, or age.
2. “The People” shall consciously undertake to respect and to encourage each other to feel safe enough to attempt the building of a community of trust in which all may try to be truthful and deeply serious in the messages they craft for the world to contemplate.
3. Poetry for the People rests upon a belief that the art of telling the truth is a necessary and a healthy way to create powerful, and positive, connections among people who, otherwise, remain (unknown and unaware) strangers. The goal is not to kill connections but, rather, to create and to deepen them among truly different men and women.

Friedrich Hayek Foto
Malcolm Muggeridge Foto
George Orwell Foto
Alexander von Humboldt Foto
Anthony Burgess Foto

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