„.. there is no longer any beauty except the struggle. Any work of art that lacks a sense of aggression can never be a masterpiece.“

In the 'First Futurist Manifesto,' Filippo Marinetti, 1909; as quoted in Critical Writings: Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, New Edition, quoted in the text on the Back Cover, Macmillan, 7 Apr 2007
1900's

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Filippo Tommaso Marinetti Foto
Filippo Tommaso Marinetti4
italienischer Dichter, Begründer des Futurismus 1876 - 1944

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Gerhard Richter Foto
Allan Kaprow Foto

„A walk down 14th street is more amazing than any masterpiece of art.“

—  Allan Kaprow American artist 1927 - 2006

[[http://streets2k5.albuscav.us/upstage_guide.pdfStreets 2K5 international festival Of Street Art (May 2005) p. 19

Daniel Buren Foto
Pope John Paul II Foto

„Not all are called to be artists in the specific sense of the term. Yet, as Genesis has it, all men and women are entrusted with the task of crafting their own life: in a certain sense, they are to make of it a work of art, a masterpiece.“

—  Pope John Paul II 264th Pope of the Catholic Church, saint 1920 - 2005

Letter to artists, 4 April 1999
Quelle: Libreria Editrice Vaticana http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/letters/documents/hf_jp-ii_let_23041999_artists_en.html

James Branch Cabell Foto

„Nothing … nothing in the universe, is of any importance, or is authentic to any serious sense, except the illusions of romance.“

—  James Branch Cabell American author 1879 - 1958

The Gander, in Book Seven : What Saraïde Wanted, Ch. XLV : The Gander Also Generalizes
The Silver Stallion (1926)
Kontext: Nothing … nothing in the universe, is of any importance, or is authentic to any serious sense, except the illusions of romance. For man alone of animals plays the ape to his dreams. These axioms — poor, deaf and blinded spendthrift! — are none the less valuable for being quoted.

Andrei Tarkovsky Foto
Auguste Rodin Foto
Jeanette Winterson Foto
Gustav Radbruch Foto
Andrei Tarkovsky Foto

„No one component of a film can have any meaning in isolation: it is the film that is the work of art.“

—  Andrei Tarkovsky, buch Sculpting in Time

And we can only talk about its components rather arbitrarily, dividing it up artificially or the sake of theoretical discussion.
Quelle: Sculpting in Time (1986), p. 114

Ernest Flagg Foto

„Beauty alone is an excellent reason for many things, but when a design is in direct conflict with common sense it cannot be a work of art.“

—  Ernest Flagg American architect 1857 - 1947

Small Houses: Their Economic Design and Construction (1922)
Kontext: Reason... to suppose any production, worthy to be called a work of art, can be made without its use is foolish.... By the use of reason many mistakes in design may be avoided and many counterfeits of art readily detected.... Beauty alone is an excellent reason for many things, but when a design is in direct conflict with common sense it cannot be a work of art.

Théophile Gautier Foto

„Art for Art's Sake means, for its adepts, the pursuit of pure beauty – without any other consideration.“

—  Théophile Gautier, Paris

L'art pour l'art signifie, pour les adeptes, un travail dégagé de toute préoccupation autre que celle du beau en lui-même.
L'art moderne (Paris: Michel Lévy Frères, 1856) p. 151; F. W. Ruckstull Great Works of Art and What Makes Them Great (New York: Putnam, 1925) p. 299

Pablo Picasso Foto

„Academic training in beauty is a sham. We have been deceived… The beauties of the Parthenon, Venuses, Nymphs, Narcissuses are so many lies. Art is not the application of a canon of beauty but what the instinct and the brain can conceive beyond any canon.“

—  Pablo Picasso Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and stage designer 1881 - 1973

Herschel Browning Chip (1968, p. 271), quoted in Chipp (1978, 266); As cited in: Constance Milbrath (1998), Patterns of Artistic Development in Children, p. 257.
1930s

Théophile Gautier Foto

„There is nothing truly beautiful but that which can never be of any use whatsoever; everything useful is ugly.“

—  Théophile Gautier, buch Mademoiselle de Maupin

Il n'y a de vraiment beau que ce qui ne peut servir à rien; tout ce qui est utile est laid.
Mademoiselle de Maupin (1835; Paris: Charpentier, 1866), Préface, p. 21; Burton Rascoe (trans.) Mademoiselle de Maupin, and One of Cleopatra's Nights (New York: A. A. Knopf, 1925) p. xxv.

William Blake Foto

„Art can never exist without Naked Beauty displayed.“

—  William Blake English Romantic poet and artist 1757 - 1827

The Laocoön
1800s

Samuel Butler Foto

„Feeling is an art and, like any other art, can be acquired by taking pains.“

—  Samuel Butler novelist 1835 - 1902

Feeling
The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1912), Part VI - Mind and Matter

James Bolivar Manson Foto
James Branch Cabell Foto

„A novel, or indeed any work of art, is not intended to be a literal transcription from Nature.“

—  James Branch Cabell American author 1879 - 1958

Writing on Charles Dickens, in "In Defence of an Obsolete Author" in William and Mary College Monthly (November 1897), VII, p. 3-4
Kontext: A novel, or indeed any work of art, is not intended to be a literal transcription from Nature. … Life is a series of false values. There it is always the little things that are greatest. Art attempts to remedy this. It may be defined as an expurgated edition of Nature.

Albert Einstein Foto

„The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion that stands at the cradle of true art and true science. Whoever does not know it and can no longer wonder, no longer marvel, is as good as dead, and his eyes are dimmed.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

Variant translations: The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. He who knows it not and can no longer wonder, no longer feel amazement, is as good as dead, a snuffed-out candle. It was the experience of mystery — even if mixed with fear — that engendered religion. A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty, which are only accessible to our reason in their most elementary forms — it is this knowledge and this emotion that constitute the truly religious attitude; in this sense, and in this alone, I am a deeply religious man.
The finest emotion of which we are capable is the mystic emotion. Herein lies the germ of all art and all true science. Anyone to whom this feeling is alien, who is no longer capable of wonderment and lives in a state of fear is a dead man. To know that what is impenetrable for us really exists and manifests itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, whose gross forms alone are intelligible to our poor faculties — this knowledge, this feeling … that is the core of the true religious sentiment. In this sense, and in this sense alone, I rank myself among profoundly religious men.
As quoted in After Einstein : Proceedings of the Einstein Centennial Celebration (1981) by Peter Barker and Cecil G. Shugart, p. 179
The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed.
As quoted in Introduction to Philosophy (1935) by George Thomas White Patrick and Frank Miller Chapman, p. 44
The most beautiful emotion we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion that stands at the cradle of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead, a snuffed-out candle. To sense that behind anything that can be experienced there is something that our minds cannot grasp, whose beauty and sublimity reaches us only indirectly: this is religiousness. In this sense, and in this sense only, I am a devoutly religious man."
He who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead; his eyes are closed.
1930s, Mein Weltbild (My World-view) (1931)
Kontext: The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion that stands at the cradle of true art and true science. Whoever does not know it and can no longer wonder, no longer marvel, is as good as dead, and his eyes are dimmed. It was the experience of mystery — even if mixed with fear — that engendered religion. A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, our perceptions of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty, which only in their most primitive forms are accessible to our minds: it is this knowledge and this emotion that constitute true religiosity. In this sense, and only this sense, I am a deeply religious man.

Paulo Coelho Foto

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