„It was wicked meeting Nelson Mandela.“

Rio Ferdinand commenting on what it was like meeting Nelson Mandelahttp://www.expertfootball.com/directory/index.php?catID=33&order=date

Letzte Aktualisierung 22. Mai 2020. Geschichte
Rio Ferdinand Foto
Rio Ferdinand
englischer Fußballspieler 1978

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P. W. Botha Foto

„Nelson Mandela can rot in prison until he dies or I die, whichever takes longer.“

—  P. W. Botha South African prime minister 1916 - 2006

Reportedly to Cape Town journalists in February 1987, though later denied. As cited by Andrew Donaldson, Sunday Times, 5 November 2006

Barack Obama Foto

„It was in service of this long walk towards freedom and justice and equal opportunity that Nelson Mandela devoted his life.“

—  Barack Obama 44th President of the United States of America 1961

2018, Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture (2018)
Kontext: It was in service of this long walk towards freedom and justice and equal opportunity that Nelson Mandela devoted his life. At the outset, his struggle was particular to this place, to his homeland – a fight to end apartheid, a fight to ensure lasting political and social and economic equality for its disenfranchised non-white citizens. But through his sacrifice and unwavering leadership and, perhaps most of all, through his moral example, Mandela and the movement he led would come to signify something larger. He came to embody the universal aspirations of dispossessed people all around the world, their hopes for a better life, the possibility of a moral transformation in the conduct of human affairs.
Madiba’s light shone so brightly, even from that narrow Robben Island cell, that in the late ‘70s he could inspire a young college student on the other side of the world to reexamine his own priorities, could make me consider the small role I might play in bending the arc of the world towards justice. And when later, as a law student, I witnessed Madiba emerge from prison, just a few months, you’ll recall, after the fall of the Berlin Wall, I felt the same wave of hope that washed through hearts all around the world.
Do you remember that feeling? It seemed as if the forces of progress were on the march, that they were inexorable. Each step he took, you felt this is the moment when the old structures of violence and repression and ancient hatreds that had so long stunted people’s lives and confined the human spirit – that all that was crumbling before our eyes. And then, as Madiba guided this nation through negotiation painstakingly, reconciliation, its first fair and free elections; as we all witnessed the grace and the generosity with which he embraced former enemies, the wisdom for him to step away from power once he felt his job was complete, we understood that – we understood it was not just the subjugated, the oppressed who were being freed from the shackles of the past. The subjugator was being offered a gift, being given a chance to see in a new way, being given a chance to participate in the work of building a better world.

Julius Malema Foto

„Our people are still staying in the same houses that were given to them by apartheid. Our people still stay in the shacks. They came and abandoned you here. They have forgotten about you. They are going to come back next year during elections and say ‘no, you must remember Nelson Mandela, this is the party of Mandela, and we have come a long way with the ANC’. Mandela is no more. He is dead, with his party.“

—  Julius Malema South African political activist 1981

As quoted by Siviwe Feketha in Mandela is no more. He is dead, with his party, says Malema Mandela is no more. He is dead, with his party, says Malema https://www.iol.co.za/news/politics/mandela-is-no-more-he-is-dead-with-his-party-says-malema-16241907, www.iol.co.za (26 July 2018)

Mengistu Haile Mariam Foto
Barack Obama Foto

„I believe in Nelson Mandela’s vision. I believe in a vision shared by Gandhi and King and Abraham Lincoln. I believe in a vision of equality and justice and freedom and multi-racial democracy, built on the premise that all people are created equal, and they’re endowed by our creator with certain inalienable rights.“

—  Barack Obama 44th President of the United States of America 1961

2018, Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture (2018)
Kontext: So, on Madiba’s 100th birthday, we now stand at a crossroads – a moment in time at which two very different visions of humanity’s future compete for the hearts and the minds of citizens around the world. Two different stories, two different narratives about who we are and who we should be. How should we respond?
Should we see that wave of hope that we felt with Madiba’s release from prison, from the Berlin Wall coming down – should we see that hope that we had as naïve and misguided? Should we understand the last 25 years of global integration as nothing more than a detour from the previous inevitable cycle of history — where might makes right, and politics is a hostile competition between tribes and races and religions, and nations compete in a zero-sum game, constantly teetering on the edge of conflict until full-blown war breaks out? Is that what we think?
Let me tell you what I believe. I believe in Nelson Mandela’s vision. I believe in a vision shared by Gandhi and King and Abraham Lincoln. I believe in a vision of equality and justice and freedom and multi-racial democracy, built on the premise that all people are created equal, and they’re endowed by our creator with certain inalienable rights. And I believe that a world governed by such principles is possible and that it can achieve more peace and more cooperation in pursuit of a common good. That’s what I believe.
And I believe we have no choice but to move forward; that those of us who believe in democracy and civil rights and a common humanity have a better story to tell. And I believe this not just based on sentiment, I believe it based on hard evidence.

George W. Bush Foto

„I thought an interesting comment was made when somebody said to me, I heard somebody say, where's Mandela? Well, Mandela is dead, because Saddam Hussein killed all the Mandelas.“

—  George W. Bush 43rd President of the United States 1946

White House Press Conference http://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/news/releases/2007/09/20070920-2.html (September 20, 2007)
Video http://www.crooksandliars.com/2007/09/20/gwb-saddam-killed-mandelas/
2000s, 2007

Tawakkol Karman Foto
Tony Benn Foto

„I was the first MP to table a motion condemning apartheid in South Africa. When I first met Nelson Mandela he was a terrorist, when I next saw him, he was a Nobel Prize winner and the President of South Africa.“

—  Tony Benn British Labour Party politician 1925 - 2014

Interview with Andrew Walker (10 March 2001), quoted in BBC News, 'Tony Benn: End of an era' (10 March 2001) http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1209497.stm
2000s

John Updike Foto
Ramakrishna Foto
Richard Dawkins Foto

„It is absolutely safe to say that if you meet somebody who claims not to believe in evolution, that person is ignorant, stupid or insane (or wicked, but I'd rather not consider that).“

—  Richard Dawkins English ethologist, evolutionary biologist and author 1941

Reviewing Blueprints: Solving the Mystery of Evolution (1989) by Maitland A. Edey and Donald C. Johanson
Last sentence expanded upon in "Ignorance is No Crime" (2001) (see below)
Kontext: p>So to the book's provocation, the statement that nearly half the people in the United States don't believe in evolution. Not just any people but powerful people, people who should know better, people with too much influence over educational policy. We are not talking about Darwin's particular theory of natural selection. It is still (just) possible for a biologist to doubt its importance, and a few claim to. No, we are here talking about the fact of evolution itself, a fact that is proved utterly beyond reasonable doubt. To claim equal time for creation science in biology classes is about as sensible as to claim equal time for the flat-earth theory in astronomy classes. Or, as someone has pointed out, you might as well claim equal time in sex education classes for the stork theory. It is absolutely safe to say that if you meet somebody who claims not to believe in evolution, that person is ignorant, stupid or insane (or wicked, but I'd rather not consider that).If that gives you offence, I'm sorry. You are probably not stupid, insane or wicked; and ignorance is no crime in a country with strong local traditions of interference in the freedom of biology educators to teach the central theorem of their subject.</p

Harry Belafonte Foto
John Updike Foto
Horatio Nelson Foto

„I am Lord Nelson. See, here's my fin.“

—  Horatio Nelson Royal Navy Admiral 1758 - 1805

Indicating his stub of his missing arm during the battle of Copenhagen, as quoted in Nelson and the Hamiltons (1969) by Jack Russell, p. 238
1800s

John Updike Foto
Mohamed Nasheed Foto
Warren Farrell Foto
Bernice King Foto
Alexandre Dumas Foto

„I prefer the wicked rather than the foolish. The wicked sometimes rest.“

—  Alexandre Dumas French writer and dramatist, father of the homonym writer and dramatist 1802 - 1870

Barack Obama Foto

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