„We hang on to every line,
And walk straight down the middle of it.“

—  Kate Bush

Song lyrics, The Sensual World (1989)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Kate Bush Foto
Kate Bush
englische Sängerin, Pianistin und Songwriterin 1958

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Mark Twain Foto

„A circle is a round straight line with a hole in the middle.“

—  Mark Twain American author and humorist 1835 - 1910

Quoting a schoolchild in "English as She Is Taught"

Ani DiFranco Foto
Archimedes Foto
Archimedes Foto
Friedensreich Hundertwasser Foto
Gus Cannon Foto

„Walk right in, sit right down, baby let your hair hang down“

—  Gus Cannon American blues musician 1883 - 1979

Song Walk Right In (1927)
Kontext: Walk right in, sit right down, baby let your hair hang down.
Everybody's talking 'bout a new way of walking;
Do you want to lose you mind?

Alvin C. York Foto

„The major suggested we go down a gully, but I knew that was the wrong way. And I told him we were not going down any gully. We were going straight through the German front line trenches back to the American lines.“

—  Alvin C. York United States Army Medal of Honor recipient 1887 - 1964

Account of 8 October 1918.
Diary of Alvin York
Kontext: The major suggested we go down a gully, but I knew that was the wrong way. And I told him we were not going down any gully. We were going straight through the German front line trenches back to the American lines.
It was their second line that I had captured. We sure did get a long way behind the German trenches! And so I marched them straight at that old German front line trench. And some more machine guns swung around and began to spit at us. I told the major to blow his whistle or I would take off his head and theirs too. So he blew his whistle and they all surrendered — all except one. I made the major order him to surrender twice. But he wouldn't. And I had to touch him off. I hated to do it. But I couldn't afford to take any chances and so I had to let him have it.

James Brown Foto

„This is an issue couples have to be straight on and agree on before they walk down that aisle; otherwise there is no way their marriage will survive.“

—  James Brown American singer, songwriter, musician, and recording artist 1933 - 2006

On having children — as quoted in Brown, J. & Eliot, M. (2005). I Feel Good: A Memoir of a Life of Soul, p. 248. New American Library: New York. ISBN 0-45121-393-9

Neal Shusterman Foto
Horace Mann Foto

„God draweth straight lines but we call them crooked.“

—  Horace Mann American politician 1796 - 1859

The Common School Journal, Vol. V, No. 18 (15 September 1843)

Gary Johnson Foto

„Politics is momentum. And we have right now straight line momentum.“

—  Gary Johnson American politician, businessman, and 29th Governor of New Mexico 1953

2016, Interview with CNBC's John Harwood (August 22, 2016)

Ani DiFranco Foto
Friedensreich Hundertwasser Foto

„The straight line is godless and immoral.“

—  Friedensreich Hundertwasser Austrian artist 1928 - 2000

Mould Manifesto against Rationalism in Architecture (1958)

Pete Yorn Foto
Antoni Gaudí Foto

„The straight line belongs to Man. The curved line belongs to God.“

—  Antoni Gaudí Catalan architect 1852 - 1926

The real author seems to be Pierre Albert-Birot https://books.google.com/books?id=3Ul51CwjUOcC&pg=PA290&dq=%22the+curved+line+that+belongs+let%27s+say+to+God+and+the+straight+line+that+belongs+to+man%22&hl=de&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22the%20curved%20line%20that%20belongs%20let%27s%20say%20to%20God%20and%20the%20straight%20line%20that%20belongs%20to%20man%22&f=false.
Attributed

Stevie Nicks Foto

„I don't want to know the reasons why,
Love keeps right on walking down the line.“

—  Stevie Nicks American singer and songwriter, member of Fleetwood Mac 1948

I Don't Want to Know
The Dance (Fleetwood Mac album) (1997), Rumours (1977)

Andrea Dworkin Foto
James Burke (science historian) Foto

„This makes you think in straight lines. And if today doesn't happen in straight lines -- think of your own experience -- why should the past have?“

—  James Burke (science historian) British broadcaster, science historian, author, and television producer 1936

Connections (1979), 10 - Yesterday, Tomorrow and You
Kontext: The question is in what way are the triggers around us likely to operate to cause things to change -- for better or worse. And, is there anything we can learn from the way that happened before, so we can teach ourselves to look for and recognize the signs of change? The trouble is, that's not easy when you have been taught as I was, for example, that things in the past happened in straight-forward lines. I mean, take one oversimple example of what I'm talking about: the idea of putting the past into packaged units -- subjects, like agriculture. The minute you look at this apparently clear-cut view of things, you see the holes. I mean, look at the tractor. Oh sure, it worked in the fields, but is it a part of the history of agriculture or a dozen other things? The steam engine, the electric spark, petroleum development, rubber technology. It's a countrified car. And, the fertilizer that follows; it doesn't follow! That came from as much as anything else from a fellow trying to make artificial diamonds. And here's another old favorite: Eureka! Great Inventors You know, the lonely genius in the garage with a lightbulb that goes ping in his head. Well, if you've seen anything of this series, you'll know what a wrong approach to things that is. None of these guys did anything by themselves; they borrowed from other people's work. And how can you say when a golden age of anything started and stopped? The age of steam certainly wasn't started by James Watt; nor did the fellow whose engine he was trying to repair -- Newcomen, nor did his predecessor Savorey, nor did his predecessor Papert. And Papert was only doing what he was doing because they had trouble draining the mines. You see what I'm trying to say? This makes you think in straight lines. And if today doesn't happen in straight lines -- think of your own experience -- why should the past have? That's part of what this series has tried to show: that the past zig-zagged along -- just like the present does -- with nobody knowing what's coming next. Only we do it more complicatedly, and it's because our lives are that much more complex than theirs were that it's worth bothering about the past. Because if you don't know how you got somewhere, you don't know where you are. And we are at the end of a journey -- the journey from the past.

Pliny the Elder Foto

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