„This ideography is a "formula language", that is, a lingua characterica, a language written with special symbols, "for pure thought", that is, free from rhetorical embellishments, "modeled upon that of arithmetic", that is, constructed from specific symbols that are manipulated according to definite rules.“

paraphrasing Frege's Begriffsschrift, a formula language, modeled upon that of arithmetic, for pure thought (1879) in Jean Van Heijenoort ed., in From Frege to Gödel: A Source Book in Mathematical Logic, 1879-1931 (1967)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 22. Mai 2020. Geschichte
Gottlob Frege Foto
Gottlob Frege5
deutscher Mathematiker, Logiker und Philosoph 1848 - 1925

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R. G. Collingwood Foto
Edward Sapir Foto

„Language is a purely human and non-instinctive method of communicating ideas, emotions and desires by means of a system of voluntarily produced symbols.“

—  Edward Sapir American linguist and anthropologist 1884 - 1939

As cited in: Geza Revesz, The Origins and Prehistory of Language, London 1956. footnote pp. 126-127; As cited in: Adam Schaff (1962). Introduction to semantics, p. 313-314
Language (1921)

Otto Neurath Foto
George Boole Foto
R. G. Collingwood Foto
Evelyn Waugh Foto

„Art is the symbol of the two noblest human efforts: to construct and to refrain from destruction.“

—  Evelyn Waugh British writer 1903 - 1966

Simone Weil, The Pre-War Notebook (1933-1939), published in First and Last Notebooks (1970) edited by Richard Rees
Misattributed

Simone Weil Foto

„Art is the symbol of the two noblest human efforts: to construct and to refrain from destruction.“

—  Simone Weil French philosopher, Christian mystic, and social activist 1909 - 1943

The Pre-War Notebook (1933-1939), published in First and Last Notebooks (1970) edited by Richard Rees

Albert Pike Foto

„All language is symbolic, so far as it is applied to mental and spiritual phenomena and action.“

—  Albert Pike, buch Morals and Dogma of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry

Quelle: Morals and Dogma of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry (1871), Ch. III : The Master, p. 62
Kontext: All religious expression is symbolism; since we can describe only what we see, and the true objects of religion are The Seen. The earliest instruments of education were symbols; and they and all other religious forms differed and still differ according to external circumstances and imagery, and according to differences of knowledge and mental cultivation. All language is symbolic, so far as it is applied to mental and spiritual phenomena and action. All words have, primarily, a material sense, howsoever they may afterward get, for the ignorant, a spiritual non-sense. To "retract," for example, is to draw back, and when applied to a statement, is symbolic, as much so as a picture of an arm drawn back, to express the same thing, would he. The very word " spirit" means " breath," from the Latin verb spiro, breathe.

Caterina Davinio Foto
George Peacock Foto
Marilyn Ferguson Foto
William John Macquorn Rankine Foto

„In treating of the practical application of scientific principles, an algebraical formula should only be employed when its shortness and simplicity are such as to render it a clearer expression of a proposition or rule than common language would be, and when there is no difficulty in keeping the thing represented by each symbol constantly before the mind.“

—  William John Macquorn Rankine civil engineer 1820 - 1872

"On the Harmony of Theory and Practice in Mechanics" (Jan. 3, 1856)
Kontext: In treating of the practical application of scientific principles, an algebraical formula should only be employed when its shortness and simplicity are such as to render it a clearer expression of a proposition or rule than common language would be, and when there is no difficulty in keeping the thing represented by each symbol constantly before the mind.<!--p. 177

Benjamin Peirce Foto

„When the formulas admit of intelligible interpretation, they are accessions to knowledge; but independently of their interpretation they are invaluable as symbolical expressions of thought.“

—  Benjamin Peirce American mathematician 1809 - 1880

On the Uses and Transformations of Linear Algebra (1875)
Kontext: The familiar proposition that all A is B, and all B is C, and therefore all A is C, is contracted in its domain by the substitution of significant words for the symbolic letters. The A, B, and C, are subject to no limitation for the purposes and validity of the proposition; they may represent not merely the actual, but also the ideal, the impossible as well as the possible. In Algebra, likewise, the letters are symbols which, passed through a machinery of argument in accord ance with given laws, are developed into symbolic results under the name of formulas. When the formulas admit of intelligible interpretation, they are accessions to knowledge; but independently of their interpretation they are invaluable as symbolical expressions of thought. But the most noted instance is the symbol called the impossible or imaginary, known also as the square root of minus one, and which, from a shadow of meaning attached to it, may be more definitely distinguished as the symbol of semi-inversion. This symbol is restricted to a precise signification as the representative of perpendicularity in quaternions, and this wonderful algebra of space is intimately dependent upon the special use of the symbol for its symmetry, elegance, and power.

Antonin Scalia Foto
George Ballard Mathews Foto

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