„The progress of science is tremendously disorderly, and the motivations that lead to this progress are tremendously varied, and the reasons why scientists go into science, the personal motivations, are tremendously varied. I have said … that science is a haven for freaks, that people go into science because they are misfits, and that it is a sheltered place where they can spin their own yarn and have recognition, be tolerated and happy, and have approval for it.“

Interview with Max Delbruck (1978), p. 87. Oral History Project, California Institute of Technology Archives, Pasadena, California.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Max Delbrück Foto
Max Delbrück1
deutsch-amerikanischer Genetiker und Biophysiker 1906 - 1981

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Aldous Huxley Foto

„Medical science has made such tremendous progress that there is hardly a healthy human left.“

—  Aldous Huxley English writer 1894 - 1963

It appears in multiple anti-vaccination books, all by Trung Nguyen and a co-writer, circa 2018. In September 2021 it is echoed everywhere, including medical-journal articles (on various subjects), with no source given. Right above the Aldous Huxley "quote", these books quote a much earlier anti-vax author. Coincidentally, that author says (elsewhere in his book) this:
Let us admire all-powerful Nature, which is not so easily brought into this serious and lasting disorder by our perverse intrusions; for otherwise, there would hardly have remained a human being alive.
Misattributed
Quelle: Christian Charles Schieferdecker, in Dr. C. G. G. Nittinger's EVILS OF VACCINATION https://www.google.com/books/edition/Dr_C_G_G_Nittinger_s_Evils_of_Vaccinatio/6CUaAAAAYAAJ, 1856, p.40

„Science is susceptible of infinite progress. But how can science be susceptible of infinite progress if its object does not have an inner infinity?“

—  Leo Strauss Classical philosophy specialist and father of neoconservativism 1899 - 1973

"Why We Remain Jews" (1962)
Kontext: Science, as the positivist understands it, is susceptible of infinite progress. That you learn in every elementary school today, I believe. Every result of science is provisional and subject to future revision, and this will never change. In other words, fifty thousand years from now there will still be results entirely different from those now, but still subject to revision. Science is susceptible of infinite progress. But how can science be susceptible of infinite progress if its object does not have an inner infinity? The belief admitted by all believers in science today — that science is by its nature essentially progressive, and eternally progressive — implies, without saying it, that being is mysterious. And here is the point where the two lines I have tried to trace do not meet exactly, but where they come within hailing distance. And, I believe, to expect more in a general way, of people in general, would be unreasonable.

Venkatraman Ramakrishnan Foto
Kurt Vonnegut Foto

„I used to think that science would save us, and science certainly tried. But we can't stand any more tremendous explosions, either for or against democracy.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut American writer 1922 - 2007

Bennington College address (1970)
Kontext: We would be a lot safer if the Government would take its money out of science and put it into astrology and the reading of palms. I used to think that science would save us, and science certainly tried. But we can't stand any more tremendous explosions, either for or against democracy.

Baruch Spinoza Foto

„Even though the divergencies are admittedly tremendous, they are due more to the difference in time, culture, and science.“

—  Baruch Spinoza Dutch philosopher 1632 - 1677

Friedrich Nietzsche, in a postcard to Franz Overbeck, Sils-Maria (30 July 1881) as translated by Walter Kaufmann in The Portable Nietzsche (1954)
Kontext: I am utterly amazed, utterly enchanted! I have a precursor, and what a precursor! I hardly knew Spinoza : that I should have turned to him just now, was inspired by "instinct". Not only is his overtendency like mine — namely, to make all knowledge the most powerful affect — but in five main points of his doctrine I recognize myself; this most unusual and loneliest thinker is closest to me precisely in these matters : he denies the freedom of the will, teleology, the moral world-order, the unegoistic, and evil. Even though the divergencies are admittedly tremendous, they are due more to the difference in time, culture, and science. In summa: my lonesomeness, which, as on very high mountains, often made it hard for me to breathe and make my blood rush out, is now at least a twosomeness. Strange!

Friedrich Nietzsche Foto

„Even though the divergencies are admittedly tremendous, they are due more to the difference in time, culture, and science.“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche, Sils-Maria

Postcard to Franz Overbeck, Sils-Maria (30 July 1881) as translated by Walter Kaufmann in The Portable Nietzsche (1954)
Kontext: I am utterly amazed, utterly enchanted! I have a precursor, and what a precursor! I hardly knew Spinoza: that I should have turned to him just now, was inspired by "instinct." Not only is his overtendency like mine—namely to make all knowledge the most powerful affect — but in five main points of his doctrine I recognize myself; this most unusual and loneliest thinker is closest to me precisely in these matters: he denies the freedom of the will, teleology, the moral world-order, the unegoistic, and evil. Even though the divergencies are admittedly tremendous, they are due more to the difference in time, culture, and science. In summa: my lonesomeness, which, as on very high mountains, often made it hard for me to breathe and make my blood rush out, is now at least a twosomeness. Strange! Incidentally, I am not at all as well as I had hoped. Exceptional weather here too! Eternal change of atmospheric conditions! — that will yet drive me out of Europe! I must have clear skies for months, else I get nowhere. Already six severe attacks of two or three days each. With affectionate love, Your friend.

Caitlín R. Kiernan Foto

„Personally, I have my doubts that science can be said to be genuinely progressive, but I'm pretty dammed certain that art is not. Which is not to say that it is not accumulative or accretionary.“

—  Caitlín R. Kiernan writer 1964

(15 June 2007)
Unfit for Mass Consumption (blog entries), 2007
Kontext: Art is not science. Even when art is about science, it is still art. There cannot be consensus, in the sense that science strives for meaningful consensus. And unlike science, art is not progressive. Personally, I have my doubts that science can be said to be genuinely progressive, but I'm pretty dammed certain that art is not. Which is not to say that it is not accumulative or accretionary. But the belief that sf writers are out there forecasting the future, that they have some social responsibility to do so, that's malarky, if you ask me. Writers of sf can only, at best, make educated guesses, and usually those guesses are wrong, and clumping together to form a consensus does not in any way insure against history unfolding in one of those other, unpredicted directions. People love to pick out the occasional instances where Jules Verne and William Gibson got it right; they rarely ever point fingers at their miscalls.

Frederick II of Prussia Foto

„Only sneaky people and impostors can oppose the progress of sciences and can discredit them, because they are the only ones who are harmed by the sciences.“

—  Frederick II of Prussia king of Prussia 1712 - 1786

Quelle: Speech at the Academy of Berlin of 27 January 1772 (inside Luca de Samuele Cagnazzi, Saggio sopra i principali metodi d'istruire i fanciulli https://books.google.it/books?id=BUdCqC_j9z8C&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&hl=it&pg=PA12#v=onepage&q&f=false - 1819 - pp. 12-13 )

Aleister Crowley Foto

„Science is always discovering odd scraps of magical wisdom and making a tremendous fuss about its cleverness.“

—  Aleister Crowley poet, mountaineer, occultist 1875 - 1947

Quelle: The Confessions of Aleister Crowley: An Autohagiography

Zach Braff Foto

„As a Jew I think it's really important to come to this place. There is such a tremendous sense of community, tremendous bond for obvious reasons. I don't know if Israelis have a sense of it because they live here, but I love it.“

—  Zach Braff American actor, director, screenwriter, producer 1975

On visiting Israel. Ha'aretz http://www.haaretz.com/culture/arts-leisure/scrubs-star-zach-braff-falls-in-love-with-tel-aviv-1.258101 (Nov. 24, 2008).

Yevgeniy Chazov Foto

„He wasn’t a man of erudition, yet very quickly grasped the significance of this or that problem for the state at large and for his own popularity rating. As one far removed from the sciences, he had tremendous respect for the opinions of scientists.“

—  Yevgeniy Chazov Russian physician 1929

On Leonid Brezhnev, as quoted in "Period of Stability" by Tatyana Shvetsova in Voice of Russia (20 July 2006) http://english.ruvr.ru/2006/07/20/103143.html.

Jerry Coyne Foto

„Why, exactly, are scientists supposed to accord “respect” to a bunch of ancient fables that are not only ludicrous on their face, but motivate so much opposition to science?“

—  Jerry Coyne American biologist 1949

" Nicholas Wade’s ridiculous prescription for curing creationism http://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com/2012/11/28/nicholas-wades-ridiculous-prescription-for-curing-creationism/" November 28, 2012

Gottlob Frege Foto
Jeffrey D. Sachs Foto

„It’s a tremendous blow to decency, to stability, it is a reason why then you have mass movements of refugees“

—  Jeffrey D. Sachs American economist 1954

Climate, Welfare..., Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 15 October, 2018 http://www.abc.net.au/tv/qanda/txt/s4892252.htm
Kontext: ... It’s a tremendous blow to decency, to stability, it is a reason why then you have mass movements of refugees.... If we don’t hold together a multilateral system, we won’t hold together in the world. And when Trump goes to the UN – I was there when he gave the speech last month – and said, “I’m a patriot. Nobody’s going to tell the United States what to do,” it’s just horrifying, this kind of thinking, this bullying talk, this idea that one of the richest counties in the world, and in aggregate richer than any high-income country has ever been in history, has such distain for helping people in desperation. I barely recognise my country from what has happened over the last 30 years.

John Gray Foto
C. V. Raman Foto

„I have a feeling that if the women of India take to science and interest themselves in the progress and advance of science as well, they will achieve what even men have failed to do. Women have one quality--the quality of devotion. It is one of the most important passports to success in science. Let us therefore not imagine that intellect is a sole prerogative of males only in science.“

—  C. V. Raman Indian physicist 1888 - 1970

Raman's views on role of women quoted in Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman:A Legend of Modern India's Science, 22 November 2013, Official Government of India's website Vigyan Prasar http://www.vigyanprasar.gov.in/scientists/cvraman/raman1.htm,

Albert Einstein Foto

„In the temple of science are many mansions, and various indeed are they that dwell therein and the motives that have led them thither.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

1910s, Principles of Research (1918)
Kontext: In the temple of science are many mansions, and various indeed are they that dwell therein and the motives that have led them thither. Many take to science out of a joyful sense of superior intellectual power; science is their own special sport to which they look for vivid experience and the satisfaction of ambition; many others are to be found in the temple who have offered the products of their brains on this altar for purely utilitarian purposes. Were an angel of the Lord to come and drive all the people belonging to these two categories out of the temple, the assemblage would be seriously depleted, but there would still be some men, of both present and past times, left inside. Our Planck is one of them, and that is why we love him.
I am quite aware that we have just now lightheartedly expelled in imagination many excellent men who are largely, perhaps chiefly, responsible for the buildings of the temple of science; and in many cases our angel would find it a pretty ticklish job to decide. But of one thing I feel sure: if the types we have just expelled were the only types there were, the temple would never have come to be, any more than a forest can grow which consists of nothing but creepers. For these people any sphere of human activity will do, if it comes to a point; whether they become engineers, officers, tradesmen, or scientists depends on circumstances.
Now let us have another look at those who have found favor with the angel. Most of them are somewhat odd, uncommunicative, solitary fellows, really less like each other, in spite of these common characteristics, than the hosts of the rejected. What has brought them to the temple? That is a difficult question and no single answer will cover it.

Lewis M. Branscomb Foto

„The progress of science still depends on "a few people of vision."“

—  Lewis M. Branscomb physicist and science policy advisor 1926

[Lewis M. Branscomb, Confessions of a technophile, Springer, 1997, 1563961180, 3]

Mark Oliphant Foto

„I believe that science is best left to scientists, that you cannot have managers or directors of science, it's got to be carried out and done by people with ideas, people with concepts, people who feel in their bones that they want to go ahead and develop this, that, or the other concept which occurs to them.“

—  Mark Oliphant Governor of South Australia (1971-76) 1901 - 2000

Quelle: Portraits in Science interviews (1994), p. 34
Kontext: I've lost any belief I ever had in scientific policy. I don't think you can have scientific policy. I think science is something like weeds, it just grows of its own accord … and if you've got the right atmosphere, the right situation within universities or within places like CSIRO, then it grows and develops of its own accord. And I believe that science is best left to scientists, that you cannot have managers or directors of science, it's got to be carried out and done by people with ideas, people with concepts, people who feel in their bones that they want to go ahead and develop this, that, or the other concept which occurs to them.

G. Stanley Hall Foto

„War has given applied psychology a tremendous impulse. This will, on the whole, do good, for psychology, which is the largest and last of the sciences, must not try to be too pure.“

—  G. Stanley Hall American psychologist 1846 - 1924

G. Stanley Hall (1919); Cited in O'Donnell, John M. " The crisis of experimentalism in the 1920s: EG Boring and his uses of history http://www.chronicstrangers.com/history%20documents/Boring,%20Values,%20and%20History.pdf." American Psychologist 34.4 (1979). p. 290

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