„Facts, facts, facts,' cries the scientist if he wants to emphasize the necessity of a firm foundation for science. What is a fact? A fact is a thought that is true. But the scientist will surely not recognize something which depends on men's varying states of mind to be the firm foundation of science.“

Gottlob Frege (1956). "The thought: A logical inquiry" in: Peter Ludlow (1997) Readings in the Philosophy of Language. p. 27

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Gottlob Frege Foto
Gottlob Frege5
deutscher Mathematiker, Logiker und Philosoph 1848 - 1925

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„Which facts are relevant and which are not relevant to a science will be relative to the current state of development of that science.“

—  Alan Chalmers, buch What Is This Thing Called Science?

Quelle: What Is This Thing Called Science? (Third Edition; 1999), Chapter 3, Experiment, p. 27.

David Graeber Foto

„In fact, communism is the foundation of all human sociability. It is what makes society possible.“

—  David Graeber American anthropologist and anarchist 1961

Quelle: Debt: The First 5,000 Years (2011), Chapter Five, "A Brief Treatise on the Moral Grounds of Moral Relations", p. 96

Henri Poincaré Foto

„Science is built up with facts, as a house is with stones. But a collection of facts is no more a science than a heap of stones is a house.“

—  Henri Poincaré, buch Wissenschaft und Hypothese

Quelle: Science and Hypothesis (1901), Ch. IX: Hypotheses in Physics, Tr. George Bruce Halsted (1913)
Kontext: The Scientist must set in order. Science is built up with facts, as a house is with stones. But a collection of facts is no more a science than a heap of stones is a house.

Alan Moore Foto

„The essential fact of our existence, perhaps the only fact of our existence – our own thought and perception is ruled off-side by the science it has invented. Science looks at the universe, doesn’t see itself there, doesn’t see mind there, so you have a world in which mind has no place.“

—  Alan Moore English writer primarily known for his work in comic books 1953

De Abaitua interview (1998)
Kontext: Mind has come up with this brilliant way of looking at the world — science — but it can’t look at itself. Science has no place for the mind. The whole of our science is based upon empirical, repeatable experiments. Whereas thought is not in that category, you can’t take thought into a laboratory. The essential fact of our existence, perhaps the only fact of our existence – our own thought and perception is ruled off-side by the science it has invented. Science looks at the universe, doesn’t see itself there, doesn’t see mind there, so you have a world in which mind has no place. We are still no nearer to coming to terms with the actual dynamics of what consciousness is.

Annie Besant Foto
Björn Ulvaeus Foto
Robert Woodrow Wilson Foto

„Cosmology is a science which has only a few observable facts to work with.“

—  Robert Woodrow Wilson American astronomer 1936

Conclusion of his Nobel lecture http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1978/wilson-lecture.html (December 8, 1978) emphasizing that every new experimental discovery increases significantly our knowledge.

Daniel Dennett Foto

„In fact, of course, science is an unparalleled playground of the imagination“

—  Daniel Dennett American philosopher 1942

"Reflections on 'A Conversation With Einstein's Brain'" in The Mind's I (1981), edited by Douglas R. Hofstadter and Daniel C. Dennett
Kontext: In fact, of course, science is an unparalleled playground of the imagination, populated by unlikely characters with wonderful names (messenger RNA, black holes, quarks) and capable of performing the most amazing deeds: sub-atomic whirling dervishes that can be in several places — everywhere and nowhere — at the same time; molecular hoop-snakes biting their own tails; self-copying spiral staircases bearing coded instructions; miniature keys searching for the locks in which they fit, on floating odysseys in a trillion synaptic gulfs.

Vladimir Nabokov Foto
John Ruskin Foto
Albert Einstein Foto

„Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

1940s, Science and Religion (1941)
Kontext: A person who is religiously enlightened appears to me to be one who has, to the best of his ability, liberated himself from the fetters of his selfish desires and is preoccupied with thoughts, feelings, and aspirations to which he clings because of their superpersonal value. It seems to me that what is important is the force of this superpersonal content and the depth of the conviction concerning its overpowering meaningfulness, regardless of whether any attempt is made to unite this content with a divine Being, for otherwise it would not be possible to count Buddha and Spinoza as religious personalities. Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself. In this sense religion is the age-old endeavor of mankind to become clearly and completely conscious of these values and goals and constantly to strengthen and extend their effect. If one conceives of religion and science according to these definitions then a conflict between them appears impossible. For science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary.

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