„Every Englishman believes that Handel now occupies an important position in heaven. If so, le bon Dieu must feel toward him very much as Louis Treize felt toward Richelieu.“

George Bernard Shaw in Ainslee's Magazine, May 1913.
Criticism

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Georg Friedrich Händel Foto
Georg Friedrich Händel4
britischer Komponist mit deutschen Emigration in der Epoche… 1685 - 1759

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„The important question is, do we want more women in management positions, or less assholes in general. I lean toward the latter.“

—  Jo Ankier British athlete and television personality 1982

During an interview with BBC - France. Dec 2011.
Jewish Chronicle, 17 August 2007, p. 11-12: "The calendar girl who's going for gold"

Prevale Foto

„Acting constantly towards a goal every day makes me feel alive.“

—  Prevale Italian DJ and producer 1983

Original: ​Agire ogni giorno costantemente verso un obiettivo, mi fa sentire vivo.
Quelle: prevale.net

Robert F. Kennedy Foto

„What is important is that all nations must march toward increasing freedom; toward justice for all; toward a society strong and flexible enough to meet the demands of all its own people, and a world of immense and dizzying change.“

—  Robert F. Kennedy American politician and brother of John F. Kennedy 1925 - 1968

Day of Affirmation Address (1966)
Kontext: All do not develop in the same manner, or at the same pace. Nations, like men, often march to the beat of different drummers, and the precise solutions of the United States can neither be dictated nor transplanted to others. What is important is that all nations must march toward increasing freedom; toward justice for all; toward a society strong and flexible enough to meet the demands of all its own people, and a world of immense and dizzying change.

Margaret Sanger Foto
Georg Christoph Lichtenberg Foto
Leo Tolstoy Foto

„Such are the scientific justifications of the principle of coercion. They are not merely weak but absolutely invalid, yet they are so much needed by those who occupy privileged positions that they believe in them as blindly as they formerly believed in the immaculate conception, and propagate them just as confidently.“

—  Leo Tolstoy, A Letter to a Hindu

Quelle: A Letter to a Hindu (1908), IV
Kontext: These new justifications are termed "scientific". But by the term "scientific" is understood just what was formerly understood by the term "religious": just as formerly everything called "religious" was held to be unquestionable simply because it was called religious, so now all that is called "scientific" is held to be unquestionable. In the present case the obsolete religious justification of violence which consisted in the recognition of the supernatural personality of the God-ordained ruler ("there is no power but of God") has been superseded by the "scientific" justification which puts forward, first, the assertion that because the coercion of man by man has existed in all ages, it follows that such coercion must continue to exist. This assertion that people should continue to live as they have done throughout past ages rather than as their reason and conscience indicate, is what "science" calls "the historic law". A further "scientific" justification lies in the statement that as among plants and wild beasts there is a constant struggle for existence which always results in the survival of the fittest, a similar struggle should be carried on among human­beings, that is, who are gifted with intelligence and love; faculties lacking in the creatures subject to the struggle for existence and survival of the fittest. Such is the second "scientific" justification. The third, most important, and unfortunately most widespread justification is, at bottom, the age-old religious one just a little altered: that in public life the suppression of some for the protection of the majority cannot be avoided — so that coercion is unavoidable however desirable reliance on love alone might be in human intercourse. The only difference in this justification by pseudo-science consists in the fact that, to the question why such and such people and not others have the right to decide against whom violence may and must be used, pseudo-science now gives a different reply to that given by religion — which declared that the right to decide was valid because it was pronounced by persons possessed of divine power. "Science" says that these decisions represent the will of the people, which under a constitutional form of government is supposed to find expression in all the decisions and actions of those who are at the helm at the moment. Such are the scientific justifications of the principle of coercion. They are not merely weak but absolutely invalid, yet they are so much needed by those who occupy privileged positions that they believe in them as blindly as they formerly believed in the immaculate conception, and propagate them just as confidently. And the unfortunate majority of men bound to toil is so dazzled by the pomp with which these "scientific truths" are presented, that under this new influence it accepts these scientific stupidities for holy truth, just as it formerly accepted the pseudo-religious justifications; and it continues to submit to the present holders of power who are just as hard-hearted but rather more numerous than before.

Gregory Palamas Foto
Malcolm X Foto
Joseph Joubert Foto
Sarada Devi Foto
Steven Pressfield Foto
Margaret Fuller Foto
Sir Charles Trevelyan, 1st Baronet Foto
Roger Ebert Foto

„I prefer vertical prayer, directed up toward heaven, rather than horizontal prayer, directed sideways toward me.“

—  Roger Ebert American film critic, author, journalist, and TV presenter 1942 - 2013

Quelle: Life Itself : A Memoir (2011), Ch. 54 : How I Believe In God
Kontext: I have no patience for churches that evangelize aggressively. I have no interest in being instructed in what I must do to be saved. I prefer vertical prayer, directed up toward heaven, rather than horizontal prayer, directed sideways toward me. I believe a worthy church must grow through attraction, not promotion. I am wary of zealotry; even as a child I was suspicious of those who, as I often heard, were “more Catholic than the pope.” If we are to love our neighbors as ourselves, we must regard their beliefs with the same respect our own deserve.

Rachel Carson Foto

„I sincerely believe that for the child, and for the parent seeking to guide him, it is not half so important to know as to feel.“

—  Rachel Carson American marine biologist and conservationist 1907 - 1964

The Sense of Wonder (1965)
Kontext: I sincerely believe that for the child, and for the parent seeking to guide him, it is not half so important to know as to feel. If facts are the seeds that later produce knowledge and wisdom, then the emotions and the impressions of the senses are the fertile soil in which the seeds must grow. The years of early childhood are the time to prepare the soil. Once the emotions have been aroused — a sense of the beautiful, the excitement of the new and the unknown, a feeling of sympathy, pity, admiration or love — then we wish for knowledge about the subject of our emotional response. Once found, it has lasting meaning. It is more important to pave the way for the child to want to know than to put him on a diet of facts he is not ready to assimilate.

John Danforth Foto
Scott Jurek Foto
Thomas Carlyle Foto
Jackson Pollock Foto

„I believe easel painting to be a dying form, and the tendency of modern feeling is toward the wall picture or mural..“

—  Jackson Pollock American artist 1912 - 1956

In his application for a grant given by the Guggenheim Foundation 1944; as quoted in Abstract expressionism, Barbara Hess, Taschen Köln, 2006, p. 9
1940's

Daniel Webster Foto

„We wish that this column, rising towards heaven among the pointed spires of so many temples dedicated to God, may contribute also to produce, in all minds, a pious feeling of dependence and gratitude.“

—  Daniel Webster Leading American senator and statesman. January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852. Served as the Secretary of State for three… 1782 - 1852

Quelle: Address on Laying the Cornerstone of the Bunker Hill Monument (1825), p. 62
Kontext: We wish that this column, rising towards heaven among the pointed spires of so many temples dedicated to God, may contribute also to produce, in all minds, a pious feeling of dependence and gratitude. We wish, finally, that the last object to the sight of him who leaves his native shore, and the first to gladden his who revisits it, may be something which shall remind him of the liberty and the glory of his country. Let it rise! let it rise, till it meet the sun in his coming; let the earliest light of the morning gild it, and the parting day linger and play on its summit!

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