„……Malik Naib Kafur marched on to Ma’bar, which he also took. He destroyed the golden idol temple (but-khanah i-zarin) of Ma’bar, and the golden idols which for ages had been worshipped by the Hindus of that country. The fragments of the golden temple, and of the broken idols of gold and gilt became the rich spoil of the army…“

—  Ziya'-ud-Din Barani, Tarikh-i-Firuz Shahi, About Sultan ‘Alau’d-Din Khalji (AD 1296-1316) conquests in Ma‘bar (Tamil Nadu) Elliot and Dowson, History of India as told by its own historians, Vol. III, p. 204
Ziya'-ud-Din Barani Foto
Ziya'-ud-Din Barani
indischer Historiker 1285 - 1357
Werbung

Ähnliche Zitate

Alauddin Khalji Foto

„Malik Naib Kafur marched on to Ma'bar, which he also took. He destroyed the golden idol temple (but-khanah i-zarin) of Ma'bar, and the golden idols which for ages had been worshipped by the Hindus of that country. The fragments of the golden temple, and of the broken idols of gold and gilt became the rich spoil of the army“

—  Alauddin Khalji Ruler of the Khalji dynasty 1266 - 1316
Quotes from The History of India as told by its own Historians, Elliot and Dowson, Vol. III : Elliot and Dowson, History of India as told by its own Historians, 8 Volumes, Allahabad Reprint, 1964. pp. 204

Werbung
Mahmud of Ghazni Foto

„He several times waged war against the infidels of Hindustan, and he brought under his subjection a large portion of their country, until, having made himself master of Somnat, he destroyed all idol temples of that country.“

—  Mahmud of Ghazni Sultan of Ghazni 971 - 1030
Quotes from The History of India as told by its own Historians, Elliot and Dowson, Vol. IV : Elliot and Dowson, History of India as told by its own Historians, 8 Volumes, Allahabad Reprint, 1964. p. 166

Muhammad of Ghor Foto
Percy Bysshe Shelley Foto

„Revenge is the naked idol of the worship of a semi-barbarous age.“

—  Percy Bysshe Shelley English Romantic poet 1792 - 1822
A Defence of Poetry http://www.bartleby.com/27/23.html (1821)

Ibrahim of Ghazna Foto
Firuz Shah Tughlaq Foto

„Aurangzeb’s religious policy had created a division in the Indian society. Communal antagonisms resulted in communal riots at Banaras, Narnaul (1672) and Gujarat (1681) where Hindus, in retaliation, destroyed mosques. Temples were destroyed in Marwar after 1678 and in 1680-81, 235 temples were destroyed in Udaipur. Prince Bhim of Udaipur retaliated by attacking Ahmadnagar and demolishing many mosques, big and small, there. Similarly, there was opposition to destruction of temples in the Amber territory, which was friendly to the Mughals. Here religious fairs continued to be held and idols publicly worshipped even after the temples had been demolished.64 In the Deccan the same policy was pursued with the same reaction. In April 1694, the imperial censor had tried to prevent public idol worship in Jaisinghpura near Aurangabad. The Vairagi priests of the temple were arrested but were soon rescued by the Rajputs.65 Aurangzeb destroyed temples throughout the country. He destroyed the temples at Mayapur (Hardwar) and Ayodhya, but “all of them are thronged with worshippers, even those that are destroyed are still venerated by the Hindus and visited by the offering of alms.” Sometimes he was content with only closing down those temples that were built in the midst of entirely Hindu population, and his officers allowed the Hindus to take back their temples on payment of large sums of money. “In the South, where he spent the last twenty-seven years of his reign, Aurangzeb was usually content with leaving many Hindu temples standing… in the Deccan where the suppression of rebellion was not an easy matter… But the discontent occasioned by his orders could not be thus brought to an end.”“

—  K. S. Lal, buch The Legacy of Muslim Rule in India
The Legacy of Muslim Rule in India (1992), Hindu resistance to such vandalism year after year and decade after decade throughout the length and breadth of the country can rather be imagined than described. Chapter 6

„In the year AH 819 (AD 1416), Ahmud Shah marched against Nagoor, on the road to which place he plundered the country, and destroyed the temples…“

—  Ahmad Shah I Indian king who founded Ahmedabad city 1389 - 1442
On way to Nagaur (Rajasthan).Tãrîkh-i-Firishta, translated by John Briggs under the title History of the Rise of the Mahomedan Power in India, first published in 1829, New Delhi Reprint 1981, Vol I, p.10-11

Muhammad bin Tughluq Foto
Muhammad of Ghor Foto
Mahmud of Ghazni Foto
James K. Morrow Foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“