„No opera plot can be sensible, for people do not sing when they are feeling sensible.“

—  W. H. Auden, buch The Dyer's Hand

"Notes on Music and Opera", p. 472
The Dyer's Hand, and Other Essays (1962)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
W. H. Auden Foto
W. H. Auden3
englischer Schriftsteller 1907 - 1973

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George Jean Nathan Foto

„Opera in English is, in the main, just about as sensible a plea as baseball in Italian.“

—  George Jean Nathan American drama critic and magazine editor 1882 - 1958

Clinical Notes, George Jean, Nathan, January 1926, American Mercury magazine https://books.google.com/books?id=k330MmVjym8C&q="Opera+in+English+is+in+the+main+just+about+as+sensible+a+plea+as+baseball+in+Italian"&pg=PA107#v=onepage,

Elizabeth Taylor Foto

„The most sensible thing to do to people you hate is to drink their brandy.“

—  Elizabeth Taylor British-American actress 1932 - 2011

Quelle: A View of the Harbour

Samuel Johnson Foto

„Nothing is little to him that feels it with great sensibility.“

—  Samuel Johnson English writer 1709 - 1784

July 20, 1762
Life of Samuel Johnson (1791), Vol I

Jane Austen Foto
Samuel Butler Foto

„Sensible painting, like sensible law, sensible writing, or sensible anything else, consists as much in knowing what to omit as what to insist upon.“

—  Samuel Butler novelist 1835 - 1902

Detail
The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1912), Part IX - A Painter's Views on Painting
Kontext: One reason why it is as well not to give very much detail is that, no matter how much is given, the eye will always want more; it will know very well that it is not being paid in full. On the other hand, no matter how little one gives, the eye will generally compromise by wanting only a little more. In either case the eye will want more, so one may as well stop sooner or later. Sensible painting, like sensible law, sensible writing, or sensible anything else, consists as much in knowing what to omit as what to insist upon.

Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach Foto

„What do people like to call stupid the most? Something sensible that they can’t understand.“

—  Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach Austrian writer 1830 - 1916

Was nennen die Menschen am liebsten dumm? Das Gescheite, das sie nicht verstehen.
Quelle: Aphorisms (1880/1893), p. 37.

James Joyce Foto

„One great part of every human existence is passed in a state which cannot be rendered sensible by the use of wideawake language, cutanddry grammar and goahead plot.“

—  James Joyce Irish novelist and poet 1882 - 1941

Referring to Finnegans Wake in a letter to Harriet Shaw Weaver (24 November 1926)

Michael Crichton Foto
George Washington Foto
Poul Anderson Foto

„Like sensible people throughout history, the average Phoenician wanted as little to do with his government as possible.“

—  Poul Anderson American science fiction and fantasy writer 1926 - 2001

Ivory, and Apes, and Peacocks (p. 313)
Time Patrol

John Ruskin Foto
Guity Novin Foto
Robert Benchley Foto
Georg Christoph Lichtenberg Foto

„There are people who believe everything is sane and sensible that is done with a solemn face.“

—  Georg Christoph Lichtenberg German scientist, satirist 1742 - 1799

E 59
Variant translation: There are people who think that everything one does with a serious face is sensible...
Aphorisms (1765-1799), Notebook E (1775 - 1776)
Kontext: There are people who believe everything is sane and sensible that is done with a solemn face. … It is no great art to say something briefly when, like Tacitus, one has something to say; when one has nothing to say, however, and none the less writes a whole book and makes truth … into a liar — that I call an achievement.

Kenan Malik Foto

„In plural societies, it is both inevitable and important that people offend the sensibilities of others.“

—  Kenan Malik English writer, lecturer and broadcaster 1960

Free speech in an age of identity politics (2015)
Kontext: In plural societies, it is both inevitable and important that people offend the sensibilities of others. Inevitable, because where different beliefs are deeply held, clashes are unavoidable. Almost by definition such clashes express what it is to live in a diverse society. And so they should be openly resolved [rather] than suppressed in the name of ‘respect’ or ‘tolerance’. And important because any kind of social change or social progress means offending some deeply held sensibilities.

„Whoever estimates the sensible sameness by the verbal identity of their common name will commit the error of mistaking for physical what is only intellectual. …the sensible signification of language is strictly limited by the sensible knowledge of the hearer.“

—  Alexander Bryan Johnson United States philosopher and banker 1786 - 1867

Part II. Of the Extent of Sensible Knowledge.
The Physiology of the Senses: Or, How and what We See, Hear, Taste, Feel and Smell (1856)

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