„Human reason has discovered many amazing things in nature and will discover still more, and will thereby increase its power over nature.“

—  Lenin

Materialism and Empirio-Criticism (1908)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Lenin Foto
Lenin27
russischer Revolutionär und Politiker 1870 - 1924

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Carl Linnaeus Foto

„Human beings, having, above all creatures, received the power of reason… need to be aware where nature is unaware. Nature reaches its culmination in humans, but human consciousness has not its essence in itself or nature.“

—  Carl Linnaeus Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist 1707 - 1778

As quoted in Carl Reinhold Bråkenhielm (2009), "Linnaeus and homo religiosus," Universitet, p. 83.

Mooji Foto
Stephen Baxter Foto
Newton Lee Foto
Paul Valéry Foto
John Adams Foto

„Human nature with all its infirmities and depravation is still capable of great things.“

—  John Adams 2nd President of the United States 1735 - 1826

Letter to Abigail Adams (29 October 1775), published Letters of John Adams, Addressed to His Wife, Vol. 1 (1841), ed. Charles Francis Adams, p. 72
1770s
Kontext: Human nature with all its infirmities and depravation is still capable of great things. It is capable of attaining to degrees of wisdom and goodness, which we have reason to believe, appear as respectable in the estimation of superior intelligences. Education makes a greater difference between man and man, than nature has made between man and brute. The virtues and powers to which men may be trained, by early education and constant discipline, are truly sublime and astonishing. Newton and Locke are examples of the deep sagacity which may be acquired by long habits of thinking and study.

Sri Chinmoy Foto
Heber J. Grant Foto

„That which we persist in doing becomes easy to do, not that the nature of the thing has changed, but our power to do has increased.“

—  Heber J. Grant President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 1856 - 1945

Attributed to Grant in: Fred G. Taylor (1944) A saga of sugar. p. 197

Mooji Foto
Steven Pinker Foto
Immanuel Kant Foto
William Hazlitt Foto

„One truth discovered is immortal, and entitles its author to be so; for, like a new substance in nature, it cannot be destroyed.“

—  William Hazlitt, buch The Spirit of the Age

"Jeremy Bentham http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Spirit_of_the_Age/Jeremy_Bentham
The Spirit of the Age (1825)

Livy Foto

„Many things complicated by nature are restored by reason.“

—  Livy Roman historian -59 - 17 v.Chr

Book XXVI, sec. 11
History of Rome

Ralph Waldo Emerson Foto

„That which we persist in doing becomes easier to do, not that the nature of the thing has changed, but our power to do so is increased.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

Variante: That which we persist in doing becomes easier to do, not that the nature of the thing has changed but that our power to do has increased.

Alexander Hamilton Foto

„In the general course of human nature, a power over a man's subsistence amounts to a power over his will.“

—  Alexander Hamilton, Federalist Papers

No. 79
The Federalist Papers (1787–1788)

„Struggle of power is natural in human because with power their individuality prevails over others.“

—  Zaman Ali Pakistani philosopher 1993

"Humanity", Ch.IV, "Rule: Power and Order" Part I

Clive Staples Lewis Foto
Jacob Bronowski Foto

„Science is nothing else than the search to discover unity in the wild variety of nature — or more exactly, in the variety of our experience.“

—  Jacob Bronowski Polish-born British mathematician 1908 - 1974

As quoted in The God Particle (1993) by Leon Lederman – ISBN 978–0–618–71168–0
Kontext: The progress of science is the discovery at each step of a new order which gives unity to what had long seemed unlike. Faraday did this when he closed the link between electricity and magnetism. Clerk Maxwell did it when he linked both with light. Einstein linked time with space, mass with energy, and the path of light past the sun with the flight of a bullet; and spent his dying years in trying to add to these likenesses another, which would find a single imaginative order between the equations between Clerk Maxwell and his own geometry of gravitation When Coleridge tried to define beauty, he returned always to one deep thought: beauty he said, is "unity in variety." Science is nothing else than the search to discover unity in the wild variety of nature — or more exactly, in the variety of our experience.

Leo Tolstoy Foto

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