„One important idea is that science is a means whereby learning is achieved, not by mere theoretical speculation on the one hand, nor by the undirected accumulation of practical facts on the other, but rather by a motivated iteration between theory and practice.“

—  George Box

Quelle: Science and Statistics (1976), p. 791

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
George Box Foto
George Box
britischer Statistiker 1919 - 2013

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George E. P. Box Foto
William John Macquorn Rankine Foto

„The evil influence of the supposed inconsistency of theory and practice upon speculative science“

—  William John Macquorn Rankine civil engineer 1820 - 1872

"On the Harmony of Theory and Practice in Mechanics" (Jan. 3, 1856)
Kontext: The evil influence of the supposed inconsistency of theory and practice upon speculative science, although much less conspicuous than it was in the ancient and middle ages, is still occasionally to be traced. This it is which opposes the mutual communication of ideas between men of science and men of practice, and which leads scientific men sometimes to employ, on problems that can only be regarded as ingenious mathematical exercises, much time and mental exertion that would be better bestowed on questions having some connection with the arts, and sometimes to state the results of really important investigations on practical subjects in a form too abstruse for ordinary use; so that the benefit which might be derived from their application is for years lost to the public; and valuable practical principles which might have been anticipated by reasoning, are left to be discovered by slow and costly experience.<!--pp. 175

Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling Foto

„The fear of speculation, the ostensible rush from the theoretical to the practical, brings about the same shallowness in action that it does in knowledge. It is by studying a strictly theoretical philosophy that we become most acquainted with Ideas, and only Ideas provide action with vigour and ethical meaning.“

—  Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling German philosopher (idealism) 1775 - 1854

Die Scheu vor der Spekulation, das angebliche Forteilen vom bloß Theoretischen zum Praktischen, bewirkt im Handeln notwendig die gleiche Flachheit wie im Wissen. Das Studium einer streng theoretischen Philosophie macht uns am unmittelbarsten mit Ideen vertraut, und nur Ideen geben dem Handeln Nachdruck und sittliche Bedeutung.
Vorlesungen über die Methode des akademischen Studiums ( Seventh Lecture http://www.zeno.org/Philosophie/M/Schelling,+Friedrich+Wilhelm+Joseph/Vorlesungen+%C3%BCber+die+Methode+des+akademischen+Studiums/7.+%C3%9Cber+einige+%C3%A4u%C3%9Fere+Gegens%C3%A4tze+der+Philosophie,+vornehmlich+den+der+positiven+Wissenschaften), Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schellings sämmtliche Werke, V, 1859, p. 277 http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?q1=%22nur%20Ideen%20geben%22;id=uva.x002624295;view=1up;seq=301;start=1;sz=10;page=search;num=277.
On University Studies (1803)

Ho Chi Minh Foto
Vernon L. Smith Foto
Yogi Berra Foto

„In theory there is no difference between theory and practice; in practice there is.“

—  Yogi Berra American baseball player, manager, coach 1925 - 2015

Attributed in Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Antifragile - Things that Gain From Disorder (2012), p. 213.
The earliest known appearance of this quote in print is Walter J. Savitch, Pascal: An Introduction to the Art and Science of Programming (1984), where it is attributed as a "remark overheard at a computer science conference". It circulated as an anonymous saying for more than ten years before attributions to Jan L. A. van de Snepscheut and Yogi Berra began to appear (and later still to various others).
Disputed, Misattributed

„In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. But, in practice, there is.“

—  Jan L. A. van de Snepscheut Dutch computer scientist 1953 - 1994

The earliest known appearance in print of this quote is Benjamin Brewster in the October 1881 - June 1882 issue of "The Yale Literary Magazine." Brewster asks, "What does his lucid explanation amount to but this, that in theory there is no difference between theory and practice, while in practice there is?" See page 202. https://books.google.com/books?id=iJ9MAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&vq=%22no+difference%22#v=onepage&q&f=false It has also been attributed by Doug Rosenberg and Matt Stephens (2007) Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UMLTheory and Practice p. xxvii as well as Walter J. Savitch, Pascal: An Introduction to the Art and Science of Programming (1984), where it is attributed as a "remark overheard at a computer science conference". It circulated as an anonymous saying for more than ten years before attributions to van de Snepscheut and Yogi Berra began to appear (and later still to various others).
Misattributed

Christian Doppler Foto

„There have been applied sciences throughout the ages. … However this so-called practice was not much more than paper in nearly all of these cases, and the various applied sciences were only lacking a bagatelle, namely proper scientific practice. The applied sciences show the application of theoretic doctrines in existing events; but that is precisely what it does, it merely shows. Whereas the scientific practice autonomously puts to use these theories.“

—  Christian Doppler mathematician, physicist 1803 - 1853

in his review of Joseph Beskiba's textbook, published in the Österreichische Blätter für Literatur und Kunst (September 7, 1844), as quoted by [Peter Schuster, Moving the stars: Christian Doppler, his life, his works and principle, and the world after, Living edition, 2005, 3901585052, 78]

William John Macquorn Rankine Foto

„Another evil, and one of the worst which arises from the separation of theoretical and practical knowledge, is the fact that a large number of persons“

—  William John Macquorn Rankine civil engineer 1820 - 1872

"On the Harmony of Theory and Practice in Mechanics" (Jan. 3, 1856)
Kontext: Another evil, and one of the worst which arises from the separation of theoretical and practical knowledge, is the fact that a large number of persons, possessed of an inventive turn of mind and of considerable skill in the manual operations of practical mechanics, are destitute of that knowledge of scientific principles which is requisite to prevent their being misled by their own ingenuity. Such men too often spend their money, waste their lives, and it may be lose their reason in the vain pursuits of visionary inventions, of which a moderate amount of theoretical knowledge would be sufficient to demonstrate the fallacy; and for want of such knowledge, many a man who might have been a useful and happy member of society, becomes a being than whom it would be hard to find anything more miserable.
The number of those unhappy persons — to judge from the patent-lists, and from some of the mechanical journals — must be much greater than is generally believed.<!--p. 176

Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling Foto
Peter Mere Latham Foto

„The practice of physic is jostled by quacks on the one side, and by science on the other.“

—  Peter Mere Latham English physician and educator 1789 - 1875

Book I, p. xxv
Collected Works

Thomas Kuhn Foto

„"Normal science" means research firmly based upon one or more past scientific achievements, achievements that some particular scientific community acknowledges for a time as supplying the foundation for its further practice“

—  Thomas Kuhn, buch The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

Quelle: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), II. The Route to Normal Science, p. 10

Jonathan Richardson Foto

„Painting is that pleasant amusement being one of the means whereby we convey ideas to each other.“

—  Jonathan Richardson English painter 1667 - 1745

Essay on the Theory of Painting (1725)

Mao Zedong Foto

„Public administration is a process or a theory, not merely an accumulation of detailed facts. It is Verwaltungslehre.“

—  Marshall E. Dimock American writer 1903 - 1991

The object of administrative study should be to discover, first, what government can properly and successfully do, and secondly, how it can do these proper things with the utmost possible efficiency and at the least possible cost both of money and of energy.
Quelle: "The Study of Administration." 1937, p. 29

Karl Marx Foto

„Money is a crystal formed of necessity in the course of the exchanges, whereby different products of labour are practically equated to one another and thus by practice converted into commodities.“

—  Karl Marx German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist 1818 - 1883

Vol. I, Ch. 2, pg. 99.
(Buch I) (1867)

William John Macquorn Rankine Foto
Roger Bacon Foto

„And this [experimental] science verifies all natural and man-made things in particular, and in their appropriate discipline, by the experimental perfection, not by arguments of the still purely speculative sciences, nor through the weak, and imperfect experiences of practical knowledge. And therefore, this is the matron of all preceding sciences, and the final end of all speculation.“
Et hæc scientia certificat omnia naturalia et artificialia in particulari et in propria disciplina, per experientiam perfectam; non per argumenta, ut scientiæ pure speculativae, nec per debiles et imperfecta experientias ut scientiae operativæ. Et ideo hæc est domina omnium scientiarum præcedentium, et finis totius speculationis.

—  Roger Bacon, buch Opus Tertium

Ch 13 ed. J. S. Brewer Opera quadam hactenus inedita (1859) p. 46
Opus Tertium, c. 1267

Qian Xuesen Foto

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