„Sex: In America an obsession. In other parts of the world a fact.“

— Marlene Dietrich, Marlene Dietrich's ABC http://books.google.com/books?id=u7x5UYHMs0IC&q=%22sex+in+america+an+obsession+in+other+parts+of+the+world+a+fact%22&pg=PT114#v=onepage (1962)

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Marlene Dietrich8
deutsch-amerikanische Schauspielerin und Sängerin 1901 - 1992
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