„What is given by the gods more desirable than the fortunate hour?“

—  Catull, list of poems by Catullus

LXII
Carmina
Original: (la) Quid datur a divis felici optatius hora?

Original

Quid datur a divis felici optatius hora?

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Catull Foto
Catull6
römischer Dichter -84 - -54 v.Chr

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Aeschylus Foto

„Good fortune is a god among men, and more than a god.“

—  Aeschylus, The Libation Bearers

Variant translation: Success is man's god.
Quelle: Oresteia (458 BC), The Libation Bearers, line 59

Joyce Carol Oates Foto

„There is an hour when you realize: here is what you have been given. More than this, you won't receive. And what this is, what your life has come to, will be taken from you. In time.“

—  Joyce Carol Oates American author 1938

Quelle: Wild Nights!: Stories About the Last Days of Poe, Dickinson, Twain, James, and Hemingway

Jon Krakauer Foto
H.L. Mencken Foto

„Socialism is the theory that the desire of one man to get something he hasn’t got is more pleasing to a just God than the desire of some other man to keep what he has got.“

—  H.L. Mencken American journalist and writer 1880 - 1956

A Little Book in C Major, New York, NY, John Lane Company (1916) p. 51
1910s

Paul Valéry Foto

„What is there more mysterious than clarity?… What more capricious than the way in which light and shade are distributed over hours and over men?“

—  Paul Valéry French poet, essayist, and philosopher 1871 - 1945

Socrates, p. 107. Ellipsis in original.
Eupalinos ou l'architecte (1921)

Seneca the Younger Foto

„Fortune has taken away, but Fortune has given.“

—  Seneca the Younger, buch Epistulae morales

Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium (Moral Letters to Lucilius), Letter LXIII

Oliver Cromwell Foto

„I desire not to keep my place in this government an hour longer than I may preserve England in its just rights, and may protect the people of God in such a just liberty of their consciences…“

—  Oliver Cromwell English military and political leader 1599 - 1658

Speech dissolving the First Protectorate Parliament (22 January 1655)

Franz Kafka Foto

„Illusions are more common than changes in fortune“

—  Franz Kafka, buch Das Schloss

Quelle: The Castle

Lauren Jauregui Foto

„Put some more hours in the day, God“

—  Lauren Jauregui Cuban-American singer and songwriter 1996

Lauren Jauregui on Twitter, Twitter, October 5, 2018 https://twitter.com/LaurenJauregui/status/1048309553199292418,

Ennius Foto

„Fortune is given to brave men.“
Fortibus est fortuna viris data.

—  Ennius Roman writer -239 - -169 v.Chr

As quoted by Macrobius in Saturnalia, Book VI, Chapter I

„No man's more fortunate than he who's poor,
Since for the worse his fortune cannot change.“

—  Diphilus Athenian poet of New Comedy

Fragment 23
Fabulae Incertae

Michel De Montaigne Foto

„There is no desire more natural than the desire of knowledge.“

—  Michel De Montaigne (1533-1592) French-Occitan author, humanistic philosopher, statesman 1533 - 1592

Ada Lovelace Foto

„God has not given to us (in this state of existence) more than very limited powers of expression of one's ideas and feelings“

—  Ada Lovelace English mathematician, considered the first computer programmer 1815 - 1852

Kontext: Circumstances have been such, that I have lived almost entirely secluded for some time. Those who are much in earnest and with single minds devoted to any great object in life, must find this occasionally inevitable.... You will wonder at having heard nothing from me; but you have experience and candour enough to perceive and know that God has not given to us (in this state of existence) more than very limited powers of expression of one's ideas and feelings... I shall be very desirous of again seeing you. You know what that means from me, and that it is no form, but the simple expression and result of the respect and attraction I feel for a mind that ventures to read direct in God's own book, and not merely thro' man's translation of that same vast and mighty work.

In a letter to Andrew Crosse, as quoted in Eugen Kölbing's Englische Studien, Volume 19 https://archive.org/stream/englischestudien19leipuoft#page/157/mode/1up (1894), Leipzig; O.R. Reisland, "Byron's Daughter", p. 157.

Joseph Stalin Foto

„What guarantee is there that the fascist literary politicians in Berlin will be more fortunate than the old and experienced conquerors in Rome? Would it not be more correct to assume that the opposite will be the case?“

—  Joseph Stalin General secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union 1879 - 1953

Report to the Seventeenth Party Congress on the Work of the Central Committee of the C.P.S.U. (B.) https://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/stalin/works/1934/01/26.htm (January 26, 1934)
Stalin's speeches, writings and authorised interviews
Kontext: Still others think that war should be organised by a "superior race," say, the German "race," against an "inferior race," primarily against the Slavs; that only such a war can provide a way out of the situation, for it is the mission of the "superior race" to render the "inferior race" fruitful and to rule over it. Let us assume that this queer theory, which is as far removed from science as the sky from the earth, let us assume that this queer theory is put into practice. What may be the result of that? It is well known that ancient Rome looked upon the ancestors of the present-day Germans and French in the same way as the representatives of the "superior race" now look upon the Slav races. It is well known that ancient Rome treated them as an "inferior race," as "barbarians," destined to live in eternal subordination to the "superior race," to "great Rome", and, between ourselves be it said, ancient Rome had some grounds for this, which cannot be said of the representatives of the "superior race" of today. (Thunderous applause.) But what was the upshot of this? The upshot was that the non-Romans, i. e., all the "barbarians," united against the common enemy and brought Rome down with a crash. The question arises: What guarantee is there that the claims of the representatives of the "superior race" of today will not lead to the same lamentable results? What guarantee is there that the fascist literary politicians in Berlin will be more fortunate than the old and experienced conquerors in Rome? Would it not be more correct to assume that the opposite will be the case?

Norman MacLeod (1812–1872) Foto
Thomas Fuller (writer) Foto

„4867. There cannot be a more intolerable Thing than a fortunate Fool.“

—  Thomas Fuller (writer) British physician, preacher, and intellectual 1654 - 1734

Introductio ad prudentiam: Part II (1727), Gnomologia (1732)

„It is more easy to get a favor from Fortune than to keep it.“
Fortunam citius reperias quam retineas.

—  Publilio Siro Latin writer

Maxim 282
Sentences

Francesco Berni Foto

„The loss of what we have is pain more dire
Than not to gain the thing that we desire.“

—  Francesco Berni Italian poet 1497 - 1535

Che 'l perder l'acquistato e maggior doglia
Che mai non acquistar quel che l'uom voglia.
XXV, 58
Rifacimento of Orlando Innamorato

Henry Edward Manning Foto
Eric Hoffer Foto

„The desire for praise is more imperative than the desire for food and shelter.“

—  Eric Hoffer American philosopher 1898 - 1983

Entry (1952)
Eric Hoffer and the Art of the Notebook (2005)
Kontext: This food-and-shelter theory concerning man's efforts is without insight. Our most persistent and spectacular efforts are concerned not with the preservation of what we are but with the building up of an imaginary conception of ourselves in the opinion of others. The desire for praise is more imperative than the desire for food and shelter.

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