„The question of whether a computer can think is no more interesting than the question of whether a submarine can swim.“

—  Charles Stross, buch Accelerando

Quelle: Accelerando (2005), Chapter 1 (“Lobsters”), p. 1 (quoting Edsger W. Dijkstra)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Charles Stross Foto
Charles Stross
britischer Science-Fiction-Schriftsteller 1964

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Edsger W. Dijkstra Foto

„The question of whether Machines Can Think… is about as relevant as the question of whether Submarines Can Swim.“

—  Edsger W. Dijkstra Dutch computer scientist 1930 - 2002

Dijkstra (1984) The threats to computing science http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/transcriptions/EWD08xx/EWD898.html (EWD898).
1980s

Larry Page Foto

„The Star Trek computer doesn't seem that interesting. They ask it random questions, it thinks for a while. I think we can do better than that.“

—  Larry Page American computer scientist and Internet entrepreneur 1973

Quoted in Ben Elgin, "Google's Goal: "Understand Everything," http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/04_18/b3881010_mz001.htm BusinessWeek (2004-05-03).

Noam Chomsky Foto
Naguib Mahfouz Foto

„You can tell whether a man is clever by his answers. You can tell whether a man is wise by his questions.“

—  Naguib Mahfouz Egyptian writer 1911 - 2006

Cited in: Michael J. Gelb (1996) Thinking for a change: discovering the power to create, communicate and lead. p. 96

Don DeLillo Foto

„I've got death inside me. It's just a question of whether or not I can outlive it.“

—  Don DeLillo, buch Weißes Rauschen

Quelle: White Noise (1984)

B.F. Skinner Foto

„The real question is not whether machines think but whether men do. The mystery which surrounds a thinking machine already surrounds a thinking man.“

—  B.F. Skinner American behaviorist 1904 - 1990

Contingencies of Reinforcement: A Theoretical Analysis (1969).
Quelle: Contingencies Of Reinforcement: A Theoretical Analysis

Nick Herbert Foto
Barack Obama Foto

„The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works — whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified.“

—  Barack Obama 44th President of the United States of America 1961

2009, First Inaugural Address (January 2009)
Kontext: What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them — that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works — whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. Where the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. Where the answer is no, programs will end.

Newton Lee Foto

„The question is not whether Total Information Awareness (TIA) is here to stay; the real question is whether TIA is a one-way street or a two-way street.“

—  Newton Lee American computer scientist

Facebook Nation: Total Information Awareness (2nd Edition), 2014

Jenny Han Foto

„Sometimes questions can be more cruel than insults“

—  Jenny Han, buch To All the Boys I've Loved Before

Quelle: To All the Boys I've Loved Before

Sarah Dessen Foto

„Sometimes a question can hurt more than an answer.“

—  Sarah Dessen, buch Along for the Ride

Quelle: Along for the Ride

Niels Bohr Foto
François Lelord Foto
Margaret Mead Foto

„It is an open question whether any behavior based on fear of eternal punishment can be regarded as ethical or should be regarded as merely cowardly.“

—  Margaret Mead American anthropologist 1901 - 1978

Attributed in American Quotations (1992) by Gorton Carruth and Eugene H. Ehrlich, p. 149
1990s

Rachel Carson Foto
Bernard Lown Foto

„The advent of the nuclear age posed an unprecedented question: not whether war would exact yet more lives but whether war would preclude human existence altogether.“

—  Bernard Lown American cardiologist developer of the DC defibrillator and the cardioverter, as well as a recipient of the Nobel Peace… 1921

A Prescription for Hope (1985)
Kontext: The hope of a benevolent civilization was shattered in the blood-soaked trenches of the First World War. The "war to end all wars" claimed sixteen million lives, and left embers which kindled an even more catastrophic conflagration.
Over the sorry course of 5,000 years of endless conflicts, some limits had been set on human savagery. Moral safeguards proscribed killing unarmed civilians and health workers, poisoning drinking waters, spreading infection among children and the disabled, and burning defenseless cities. But the Second World War introduced total war, unprincipled in method, unlimited in violence, and indiscriminate in victims. The ovens of Auschwitz and the atomic incineration of Hiroshima and Nagasaki inscribed a still darker chapter in the chronicle of human brutality. The prolonged agony which left 50 million dead did not provide an enduring basis for an armistice to barbarism. On the contrary, arsenals soon burgeoned with genocidal weapons equivalent to many thousands of World War II's.
The advent of the nuclear age posed an unprecedented question: not whether war would exact yet more lives but whether war would preclude human existence altogether.

Christopher Paolini Foto
John Allen Paulos Foto

„One can and should debate whether the tests in question are appropriate for the purposes at hand, but one shouldn’t be surprised when normal curves behave normally.“

—  John Allen Paulos, buch A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper

Section 2, “Local, Social, and Business Issues” Chapter 11, “Company Charged with Ethnic Bias in Hiring” (p. 61)
A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper (1995)

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