„Today we know that on the sub-atomic level the fate of an electron or a whole atom is not determined by its past. But this discovery has not led to any basically new departure in the philosophy of nature, only to a state of bewildered embarrassment, a further retreat of physics into a language of even more abstract symbolism. Yet if causality has broken down and events are not rigidly governed by the pushes and pressures of the past, may they not be influenced in some manner by the "pull" of the future—which is a manner of saying that "purpose" may be a concrete physical factor in the evolution of the universe, both on the organic and unorganic levels. In the relativistic cosmos, gravitation is a result of the curvature and creases in space which continually tend to straighten themselves out—which, as Whittaker remarked, "is a statement so completely teleological that it certainly would have delighted the hearts of the schoolmen."“

Epilogue [footnote referenced E.T. Whittaker's Space and Spirit (1946)]
The Sleepwalkers: A History of Man's Changing Vision of the Universe (1959)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Arthur Koestler Foto
Arthur Koestler2
britischer Schriftsteller 1905 - 1983

Ähnliche Zitate

Iain Banks Foto
James Jeans Foto
Werner Heisenberg Foto
Ted Chiang Foto
Francis Heylighen Foto

„It is not easy to tear any event out of the context of the universe in which it occurred without detaching from it some factor that influenced it.“

—  Carroll Quigley American historian 1910 - 1977

Quelle: The Evolution of Civilizations (1961) (Second Edition 1979), Chapter 1, Scientific Method and the Social Sciences, p. 35

William Kingdon Clifford Foto

„We may… be treating merely as physical variations effects which are really due to changes in the curvature of our space; whether, in fact, some or all of those causes which we term physical may not be due to the geometrical construction of our space. There are three kinds of variation in the curvature of our space which we ought to consider as within the range of possibility.“

—  William Kingdon Clifford English mathematician and philosopher 1845 - 1879

Clifford & Pearson, Ch IV, Position, §19 On the Bending of Space
The Common Sense of the Exact Sciences (1885)
Kontext: We may... be treating merely as physical variations effects which are really due to changes in the curvature of our space; whether, in fact, some or all of those causes which we term physical may not be due to the geometrical construction of our space. There are three kinds of variation in the curvature of our space which we ought to consider as within the range of possibility.
(i) Our space is perhaps really possessed of a curvature varying from point to point, which we fail to appreciate because we are acquainted with only a small portion of space, or because we disguise its small variations under changes in our physical condition which we do not connect with our change of position. The mind that could recognise this varying curvature might be assumed to know the absolute position of a point. For such a mind the postulate of the relativity of position would cease to have a meaning. It does not seem so hard to conceive such a state of mind as the late Professor Clerk-Maxwell would have had us believe. It would be one capable of distinguishing those so-called physical changes which are really geometrical or due to a change of position in space.
(ii) Our space may be really same (of equal curvature), but its degree of curvature may change as a whole with the time. In this way our geometry based on the sameness of space would still hold good for all parts of space, but the change of curvature might produce in space a succession of apparent physical changes.
(iii) We may conceive our space to have everywhere a nearly uniform curvature, but that slight variations of the curvature may occur from point to point, and themselves vary with the time. These variations of the curvature with the time may produce effects which we not unnaturally attribute to physical causes independent of the geometry of our space. We might even go so far as to assign to this variation of the curvature of space 'what really happens in that phenomenon which we term the motion of matter.' <!--pp. 224-225

Derek Landy Foto
James Jeans Foto
Paul Davies Foto
John Maynard Keynes Foto

„The atomic hypothesis which had worked so splendidly in Physics breaks down in Psychics.“

—  John Maynard Keynes British economist 1883 - 1946

"Francis Ysidro Edgeworth", p. 286; Originally published in The Economic Journal, March 1926

Ref: en.wikiquote.org - John Maynard Keynes / Quotes / Essays In Biography (1933)
Essays In Biography (1933), Francis Ysidro Edgeworth

J. Howard Moore Foto
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel Foto
Robert Oppenheimer Foto
Albert Einstein Foto

„Today the atomic bomb has altered profoundly the nature of the world as we know it, and the human race consequently finds itself in a new habitat to which it must adapt its thinking.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

"Only Then Shall We Find Courage", New York Times Magazine (23 June 1946).
1940s

Ähnliche Themen