„Ah! as you say, we should slip over many thoughts and act as though we did not perceive them.“

Ah! comme vous dites, il faut glisser sur bien des pensées, et ne faire pas semblant de les voir.
Lettres, 70.
Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations

Original

Ah! comme vous dites, il faut glisser sur bien des pensées, et ne faire pas semblant de les voir.

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 22. Mai 2020. Geschichte
Marie de Sevigné Foto
Marie de Sevigné10
Marquise de Sévigné 1626 - 1696

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Henri Barbusse Foto

„Ah, it seems that truth goes farther in all directions than one thought! We bend over the wrong that animals suffer, for them we wholly understand.“

—  Henri Barbusse French novelist 1873 - 1935

Light (1919), Ch. XIV - The Ruins
Kontext: The horse has not stopped bleeding. Its blood falls on me drop by drop with the regularity of a clock, — as though all the blood that is filtering through the strata of the field and all the punishment of the wounded came to a head in him and through him. Ah, it seems that truth goes farther in all directions than one thought! We bend over the wrong that animals suffer, for them we wholly understand.
Men, men! Everywhere the plain has a mangled outline. Below that horizon, sometimes blue-black and sometimes red-black, the plain is monumental!

D.H. Lawrence Foto

„The great necessity is that we should act according to our thoughts, and think according to our acts. But while we are in thought we cannot really act, and while we are in action we cannot really think. The two conditions, of thought and action, are mutually exclusive. Yet they should be related in harmony.“

—  D.H. Lawrence English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter 1885 - 1930

A Propos of Lady Chatterley's Lover (1929)
Kontext: We are today, as human beings, evolved and cultured far beyond the taboos which are inherent in our culture. This is a very important fact to realise. Probably, to the Crusaders, mere words were potent and evocative to a degree we can't realise. The evocative power of the so-called obscene words must have been very dangerous to the dim-minded, obscure, violent natures of the Middle Ages, and perhaps are still too strong for slow-minded, half-evoked lower natures today. But real culture makes us give to a word only those mental and imaginative reactions which belong to the mind, and saves us from violent and indiscriminate physical reactions which may wreck social decency. In the past, man was too weak-minded, or crude-minded, to contemplate his own physical body and physical functions, without getting all messed up with physical reactions that overpowered him. It is no longer so. Culture and civilisation have taught us to separate the reactions. We now know the act does not necessarily follow on the thought. In fact, thought and action, word and deed, are two separate forms of consciousness, two separate lives which we lead. We need, very sincerely, to keep a connection. But while we think, we do not act, and while we act we do not think. The great necessity is that we should act according to our thoughts, and think according to our acts. But while we are in thought we cannot really act, and while we are in action we cannot really think. The two conditions, of thought and action, are mutually exclusive. Yet they should be related in harmony.

Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh Foto

„Ah good, there's so many over there you feel they breed them just to put in orphanages.“

—  Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh member of the British Royal Family, consort to Queen Elizabeth II 1921

Said while presenting a Duke of Edinburgh Award to a student. When informed that the young man was going to help out in Romania for six months, he asked if the student was going to help the Romanian orphans and was told that he was not, as quoted in "Duke under fire for Romanian orphans 'joke'" http://news.scotsman.com/topics.cfm?tid=255&id=998522006 in The Scotsman (8 July 2006)
2000s

Subcomandante Marcos Foto
Abraham Lincoln Foto

„The purposes of the Almighty are perfect, and must prevail, though we erring mortals may fail to accurately perceive them in advance.“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

Letter to Eliza Gurney http://quod.lib.umich.edu/l/lincoln/lincoln7/1:1171?rgn=div1;view=fulltext (4 September 1864); quoted in Roy P. Basler, ed., The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7 (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1953), p. 535
1860s
Kontext: I am much indebted to the good christian people of the country for their constant prayers and consolations; and to no one of them, more than to yourself. The purposes of the Almighty are perfect, and must prevail, though we erring mortals may fail to accurately perceive them in advance. We hoped for a happy termination of this terrible war long before this; but God knows best, and has ruled otherwise. We shall yet acknowledge His wisdom and our own error therein. Meanwhile we must work earnestly in the best light He gives us, trusting that so working still conduces to the great ends He ordains. Surely He intends some great good to follow this mighty convulsion, which no mortal could make, and no mortal could stay.

Henry Austin Dobson Foto

„Time goes, you say? Ah, no!
Alas, Time stays, we go.“

—  Henry Austin Dobson English poet and essayist 1840 - 1921

The Paradox of Time http://books.google.com/books?id=KW4NAAAAYAAJ&q="time+goes+you+say+ah+no+alas+time+stays+we+go"&pg=PA175#v=onepage (1886).

Djuna Barnes Foto

„Ah God! she settles down we say;
It means her powers slip away
It means she draws back day by day
From good or bad.“

—  Djuna Barnes American Modernist writer, poet and artist 1892 - 1982

From Third Avenue On
The Book of Repulsive Women (1915)

Johann Gottlieb Fichte Foto
Max Tegmark Foto
Larry Wall Foto
Henry Kirke White Foto
Fausto Cercignani Foto
Billy Joel Foto
Anna Sewell Foto
Terence McKenna Foto

„The world which we perceive is a tiny fraction of the world which we can perceive, which is a tiny fraction of the perceivable world, you see.“

—  Terence McKenna American ethnobotanist 1946 - 2000

"Understanding and Imagination in the Light of Nature"
Variante: The world which we perceive is a tiny fraction of the world which we can perceive, which is a tiny fraction of the perceivable world...
Kontext: Because the fact is, what blinds us to the presence of alien intelligence is linguistic and cultural bias operating on ourselves. The world which we perceive is a tiny fraction of the world which we can perceive, which is a tiny fraction of the perceivable world, you see. We operate on a very narrow slice based on cultural conventions. So the important thing, if synergizing progress is the notion to be maximized (and I think it's the notion to be maximized), is to try and locate the blind spot in the culture — the place where the culture isn't looking, because it dare not — because if it were to look there, its previous values would dissolve, you see. For Western Civilization that place is the psychedelic experience as it emerges out of nature.

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