„Proposition 14. The straight line joined from the centre of the earth to the centre of the moon has to the straight line cut off from the axis towards the centre of the moon by the straight line subtending the (circumference) within the earth's shadow a ratio greater than that which 675 has to 1.“

p, 125
On the Sizes and Distances of the Sun and the Moon (c. 250 BC)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 22. Mai 2020. Geschichte
Aristarchos von Samos Foto
Aristarchos von Samos
griechischer Astronom, Vertreter des heliozentrischen Weltb…

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Aristarchus of Samos Foto
Archimedes Foto
Archimedes Foto
Archimedes Foto
Aristarchus of Samos Foto
Aristarchus of Samos Foto
Aristarchus of Samos Foto
Aristarchus of Samos Foto
Johannes Kepler Foto
Aristarchus of Samos Foto

„Proposition 18. The earth is to the moon in a ratio greater than that which 1259712 has to 79507, but less than that which 216000 has to 6859.“

—  Aristarchus of Samos ancient Greek astronomer and mathematician

p, 125
On the Sizes and Distances of the Sun and the Moon (c. 250 BC)
Variante: Proposition 17. The diameter of the earth is to the diameter of the moon in a ratio greater than that which 108 has to 43, but less than that which 60 has to 19.

Archimedes Foto
Thomas Mann Foto
Friedensreich Hundertwasser Foto

„As Hegel well knew, the ascent of reason has never followed a straight line.“

—  Paul A. Baran American Marxist economist 1909 - 1964

Quelle: The Political Economy Of Growth (1957), Chapter Eight, The Steep Ascent, p. 298

Friedensreich Hundertwasser Foto

„The straight line is godless and immoral.“

—  Friedensreich Hundertwasser Austrian artist 1928 - 2000

Mould Manifesto against Rationalism in Architecture (1958)

Chuck Palahniuk Foto
Antoni Gaudí Foto

„The straight line belongs to Man. The curved line belongs to God.“

—  Antoni Gaudí Catalan architect 1852 - 1926

The real author seems to be Pierre Albert-Birot https://books.google.com/books?id=3Ul51CwjUOcC&pg=PA290&dq=%22the+curved+line+that+belongs+let%27s+say+to+God+and+the+straight+line+that+belongs+to+man%22&hl=de&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22the%20curved%20line%20that%20belongs%20let%27s%20say%20to%20God%20and%20the%20straight%20line%20that%20belongs%20to%20man%22&f=false.
Attributed

Oliver Wendell Holmes Foto
Aristarchus of Samos Foto
James Burke (science historian) Foto

„This makes you think in straight lines. And if today doesn't happen in straight lines -- think of your own experience -- why should the past have?“

—  James Burke (science historian) British broadcaster, science historian, author, and television producer 1936

Connections (1979), 10 - Yesterday, Tomorrow and You
Kontext: The question is in what way are the triggers around us likely to operate to cause things to change -- for better or worse. And, is there anything we can learn from the way that happened before, so we can teach ourselves to look for and recognize the signs of change? The trouble is, that's not easy when you have been taught as I was, for example, that things in the past happened in straight-forward lines. I mean, take one oversimple example of what I'm talking about: the idea of putting the past into packaged units -- subjects, like agriculture. The minute you look at this apparently clear-cut view of things, you see the holes. I mean, look at the tractor. Oh sure, it worked in the fields, but is it a part of the history of agriculture or a dozen other things? The steam engine, the electric spark, petroleum development, rubber technology. It's a countrified car. And, the fertilizer that follows; it doesn't follow! That came from as much as anything else from a fellow trying to make artificial diamonds. And here's another old favorite: Eureka! Great Inventors You know, the lonely genius in the garage with a lightbulb that goes ping in his head. Well, if you've seen anything of this series, you'll know what a wrong approach to things that is. None of these guys did anything by themselves; they borrowed from other people's work. And how can you say when a golden age of anything started and stopped? The age of steam certainly wasn't started by James Watt; nor did the fellow whose engine he was trying to repair -- Newcomen, nor did his predecessor Savorey, nor did his predecessor Papert. And Papert was only doing what he was doing because they had trouble draining the mines. You see what I'm trying to say? This makes you think in straight lines. And if today doesn't happen in straight lines -- think of your own experience -- why should the past have? That's part of what this series has tried to show: that the past zig-zagged along -- just like the present does -- with nobody knowing what's coming next. Only we do it more complicatedly, and it's because our lives are that much more complex than theirs were that it's worth bothering about the past. Because if you don't know how you got somewhere, you don't know where you are. And we are at the end of a journey -- the journey from the past.

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