„When Scythrop grew up, he was sent, as usual, to a public school, where a little learning was painfully beaten into him, and from thence to the university, where it was carefully taken out of him.“

—  Thomas Love Peacock, buch Nightmare Abbey

Nightmare Abbey, chapter I (1818).

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Thomas Love Peacock Foto
Thomas Love Peacock3
britischer Schriftsteller und Literaturkritiker 1785 - 1866

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„From childhood we are trained to have problems. When we are sent to school, we have to learn how to write, how to read, and all the rest of it.“

—  Jiddu Krishnamurti Indian spiritual philosopher 1895 - 1986

Quelle: 1980s, That Benediction is Where You Are (1985), p. 18
Kontext: From childhood we are trained to have problems. When we are sent to school, we have to learn how to write, how to read, and all the rest of it. How to write becomes a problem to the child. Please follow this carefully. Mathematics becomes a problem, history becomes a problem, as does chemistry. So the child is educated, from childhood, to live with problems — the problem of God, problem of a dozen things. So our brains are conditioned, trained, educated to live with problems. From childhood we have done this. What happens when a brain is educated in problems? It can never solve problems; it can only create more problems. When a brain that is trained to have problems, and to live with problems, solves one problem, in the very solution of that problem, it creates more problems. From childhood we are trained, educated to live with problems and, therefore, being centred in problems, we can never solve any problem completely. It is only the free brain that is not conditioned to problems that can solve problems. It is one of our constant burdens to have problems all the time. Therefore our brains are never quiet, free to observe, to look. So we are asking: Is it possible not to have a single problem but to face problems? But to understand those problems, and to totally resolve them, the brain must be free.

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„The bad poet is usually unconscious where he ought to be conscious, and conscious where he ought to be unconscious.“

—  T.S. Eliot, buch Tradition and the Individual Talent

Tradition and the Individual Talent (1919)
Kontext: The bad poet is usually unconscious where he ought to be conscious, and conscious where he ought to be unconscious. Both errors tend to make him "personal." Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality, but an escape from personality. But, of course, only those who have personality and emotions know what it means to want to escape from these things.

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„The end of learning is to know God, and out of that knowledge to love Him and imitate Him.“

—  John Milton English epic poet 1608 - 1674

Quote reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 364

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„Pearson shut out of science everything which the nineteenth-century had brought into it. He told his scholars that they must put up with a fraction of the universe, and a very small fraction at that — the circle reached by the senses, where sequence could be taken for granted.“

—  Henry Adams journalist, historian, academic, novelist 1838 - 1918

Adams quotes — and takes the title of this chapter — from Karl Pearson's classic work The Grammar of Science: "In the chaos behind sensations, in the 'beyond' of sense-impressions, we cannot infer necessity, order or routine, for these are concepts formed by the mind of man on this side of sense-impressions." "Briefly chaos is all that science can logically assert of the supersensuous."
The Education of Henry Adams (1907)

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