„Game theory, however, deals only with the way in which ultrasmart, all knowing people should behave in competitive situations, and has little to say to Mr. X as he confronts the morass of his problem.“

—  Howard Raiffa, Prologue, p. 2.
Howard Raiffa Foto
Howard Raiffa
US-amerikanischer Statistiker 1924 - 2016
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„Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll use regular expressions." Now they have two problems.“

—  Jamie Zawinski American programmer 1968
alt.religion.emacs http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=33F0C496.370D7C45%40netscape.com (lost; recovered http://regex.info/blog/2006-09-15/247)

Ernest Flagg Foto
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„Larry is different than people think. He really loves the game and is really smart. He has the innate ability to focus on what's important and has a great feel for players. He knows how to deal with people. He's direct and definite. I think the players appreciate that.“

—  Larry Bird basketball player and coach 1956
Donnie Walsh — reported in Sam Smith (February 8, 2004) "Bird sets fast pace - Hall of Fame player and former coach Larry Bird finds 'every day's exciting' in his first go-around as general manager of the Indiana Pacers", Chicago Tribune, p. 11.

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Jacob Bronowski Foto

„The question of how man ought to behave is a social question, which always involves several people; and if he accepts no evidence and no judgment except his own, he has no tools with which to frame an answer.“

—  Jacob Bronowski Polish-born British mathematician 1908 - 1974
Context: Positivists and analysts alike believe that the words is and ought belong to different worlds, so that sentences which are constructed with is usually have verifiable meaning, but sentences constructed with ought never have. This is because Ludwig Wittgenstein's unit, and Bertrand Russell's unit, is one man; all British empiricist philosophy is individualist. And it is of course clear that if the only criterion of true and false which a man accepts is that man's, then he has no base for social agreement. The question of how man ought to behave is a social question, which always involves several people; and if he accepts no evidence and no judgment except his own, he has no tools with which to frame an answer. Part 3: "The Sense of Human Dignity", §3 (p. 56) <!-- I find this cited in several places but not actually quoted in full anywhere. -->

Richard R. Wright Jr. Foto
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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“