„The idea that a country's economic fortunes are largely determined by its success on world markets is a hypothesis, not a necessary truth; and as a practical, empirical matter, that hypothesis is flatly wrong. That is, it is simply not the case that the world's leading nations are to any important degree in economic competition with each other, or that any of their major economic problems can be attributed to failures to compete on world markets.“

Pop Internationalism (1996), Competitiveness: A Dangerous Obsession (1994)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Paul Krugman Foto
Paul Krugman
US-amerikanischer Ökonom und Publizist 1953

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Ian Bremmer Foto

„An emerging market is a country where politics matters at least as much as economics to the market.“

—  Ian Bremmer American political scientist 1969

"Managing Risk in an Unstable World," http://custom.hbsp.com/b01/en/implicit/product.jhtml?login=BREM060105&password=BREM060105&pid=1126 Harvard Business Review (June 2005).

Jan Tinbergen Foto
N. Gregory Mankiw Foto
Ludwig Erhard Foto
John Mearsheimer Foto
Samuel P. Huntington Foto

„It is my hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in this new world will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. The great divisions among humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be cultural.“

—  Samuel P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations?

"The Clash of Civilizations?," in Foreign Affairs (1993)
Kontext: It is my hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in this new world will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. The great divisions among humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be cultural. Nation-states will remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines of the future.

Rachel Maddow Foto
John Kenneth Galbraith Foto

„Economic theory is the most prestigious subject of instruction and study. Agricultural economics, labor economics and marketing are lower caste fields of study.“

—  John Kenneth Galbraith, buch The New Industrial State

Quelle: The New Industrial State (1967), Chapter X, Section 5, p. 122 (Mr. Galbraith was originally an agricultural economist...)

„The economic success of the Reagan Administration was largely dependent upon the pyramiding of massive debt and the siphoning of capital from the rest of the world.“

—  Robert Gilpin Political scientist 1930 - 2018

Quelle: The Political Economy of International Relations (1987), Chapter Nine, transformation Of The Global Economy, p. 362

Paul Krugman Foto
Joseph E. Stiglitz Foto

„1. The standard neoclassical model the formal articulation of Adam Smith's invisible hand, the contention that market economies will ensure economic efficiency provides little guidance for the choice of economic systems, since once information imperfections (and the fact that markets are incomplete) are brought into the analysis, as surely they must be, there is no presumption that markets are efficient.
2. The Lange-Lerner-Taylor theorem, asserting the equivalence of market and market socialist economies, is based on a misguided view of the market, of the central problems of resource allocation, and (not surprisingly, given the first two failures) of how the market addresses those basic problems.
3. The neoclassical paradigm, through its incorrect characterization of the market economies and the central problems of resource allocation, provides a false sense of belief in the ability of market socialism to solve those resource allocation problems. To put it another way, if the neoclassical paradigm had provided a good description of the resource allocation problem and the market mechanism, then market socialism might well have been a success. The very criticisms of market socialism are themselves, to a large extent, criticisms of the neoclassical paradigm.
4. The central economic issues go beyond the traditional three questions posed at the beginning of every introductory text: What is to be produced? How is it to be produced? And for whom is it to be produced? Among the broader set of questions are: How should these resource allocation decisions be made? Who should make these decisions? How can those who are responsible for making these decisions be induced to make the right decisions? How are they to know what and how much information to acquire before making the decisions? How can the separate decisions of the millions of actors decision makers in the economy be coordinated?
5. At the core of the success of market economies are competition, markets, and decentralization. It is possible to have these, and for the government to still play a large role in the economy; indeed it may be necessary for the government to play a large role if competition is to be preserved. There has recently been extensive confusion over to what to attribute the East Asian miracle, the amazingly rapid growth in countries of this region during the past decade or two. Countries like Korea did make use of markets; they were very export oriented. And because markets played such an important role, some observers concluded that their success was convincing evidence of the power of markets alone. Yet in almost every case, government played a major role in these economies. While Wade may have put it too strongly when he entitled his book on the Taiwan success Governing the Market, there is little doubt that government intervened in the economy through the market.
6. At the core of the failure of the socialist experiment is not just the lack of property rights. Equally important were the problems arising from lack of incentives and competition, not only in the sphere of economics but also in politics. Even more important perhaps were problems of information. Hayek was right, of course, in emphasizing that the information problems facing a central planner were overwhelming. I am not sure that Hayek fully appreciated the range of information problems. If they were limited to the kinds of information problems that are at the center of the Arrow-Debreu model consumers conveying their preferences to firms, and scarcity values being communicated both to firms and consumers then market socialism would have worked. Lange would have been correct that by using prices, the socialist economy could "solve" the information problem just as well as the market could. But problems of information are broader.“

—  Joseph E. Stiglitz, buch Whither Socialism?

Quelle: Whither Socialism? (1994), Ch. 1 : The Theory of Socialism and the Power of Economic Ideas

Barack Obama Foto

„Adam Smith, the father of free-market economics,“

—  Barack Obama 44th President of the United States of America 1961

2013, Remarks on Economic Mobility (December 2013)
Kontext: It was Adam Smith, the father of free-market economics, who once said, “They who feed, clothe, and lodge the whole body of the people should have such a share of the produce of their own labor as to be themselves tolerably well fed, clothed, and lodged.” And for those of you who don’t speak old-English let me translate. It means if you work hard, you should make a decent living. If you work hard, you should be able to support a family.

Samuel Bowles Foto
Richard Overy Foto

„Hitler was ‘an enemy of free-market economics’ and a ‘reluctant dirigiste.“

—  Richard Overy British historian 1947

Quelle: War and Economy in the Third Reich (1994), pp. 1–2

„A market is not politically neutral; its existence creates economic power which one actor can use against another.“

—  Robert Gilpin Political scientist 1930 - 2018

Quelle: The Political Economy of International Relations (1987), Chapter One, Nature of Political Economy, p. 23

Albert O. Hirschman Foto

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