„Thou seest, then, in what foulness unrighteous deeds are sunk, with what splendour righteousness shines. Whereby it is manifest that goodness never lacks its reward, nor crime its punishment.“

—  Anicius Manlius Boëthius, Prose III, line 1; translation by H. R. James
Original

Videsne igitur quanto in caeno probra volvantur, qua probitas luce resplendeat? In quo perspicuum est numquam bonis praemia, numquam sua sceleribus deesse supplicia.

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Anicius Manlius Boëthius9
spätantiker römischer Philosoph und Staatsmann 480
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